German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
a couple years ago Nala's eyes stopped making tears. we took her to the vet and they said there was not much we could do.. we did eye drops for a couple months and that did not helped. I posted on this message board..
at the time my son was turning 2.. he had a trach/vent support home nursing.. Nala would be up in the living room, as if watching the nurses.. She loves Cody, he loves her..
we also, have a teenager, Nala was outside with Her and Nala saved her from a guy, who was was acting odd, standing on the sidewalk, just staring at her.. Nala being the momma hen, scared the guy off. we called the cops after..

with the help of some donations, we were able to get her eyes fixed, at fox valley vet. the vet took her Saliva glands and moved them to her eyes.. so in turn that saved her eyes.. for the 1st 6/ 7 months, they stayed normal, then they started running like crazy..
to be honest, its very gross.. one of us stays by her until after she eats, then we have to get her eyes with a towel. if she barks, gets excited, anything they drip.
its trashed the carpet... from her rubbing her face all over the carpet.. we took her back to the vet, they did a flush, to check if it was blocked..

in the past we have had a friend who would take Nala out for us, when we go out of town.. a couple years ago, when we got back both sides of her face wear red/hair missing around her eyes.. she was not taken care of.. so, we don't want to ask them no more..
its a lot of work, if her eyes are not kept dry, her face.. hair comes of her face..

lately, she has not been listening to us, even when we take her outside.. she pulls us, barks at everything...

any ideas, how to stop this......
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,368 Posts
have you taken her back to the place/surgeon who did the initial surgery? I'd start there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
yea, he did a flush to see if the glands were blocked.. came back normal, he said that the glands he used are gushers.. if we have them removed (glands to her eyes) then she'll go back to dry eye.. could go blind.

poor nala
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,649 Posts
Here is some interesting information: Dogs? Watery Eyes and Eye Discharge: Causes and Treatments

If this were my dog I would try colloidal silver. My cat Varda has a chronic URI and when she gets sick her eyes constantly tear up. If I put a drop of colloidal silver in each eye it clears up almost immediately. I have also used it for Rafi when his eyes were goopy and it worked great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,717 Posts
So you're choices are

1) Rehome the dog
2) somehow try to fix the saliva gland so it doesn't leak
3) Remove the saliva gland and the dog goes blind

So what is the least of all the evils? it will be really hard to rehome a senior dog with health issues. You can almost cross that one off your list.

No treatment means the dog's eyes will continue to water. I'm not a doctor but I'm thinking that saliva is actually sterile until it is released into the mouth. If it has bacteria in it, they would not be able to route the gland to the eye. It would cause infection. You should discuss with your vet how unsanitary this actually is. This seems to be a common issue when doing this surgery but I see no solution in a quick google search. Maybe you should contact a university vet center

http://www.animaleyeclinic.us/dryeye.htm
Saliva is of a similar composition to tear fluid

OR>>> You reverse the surgery and your senior dog goes blind. So, is this the worse thing that could possibly happen to the dog? Many dogs out there are blind. How long would it take for the dog to go blind? I assume using the appropriate eye drops would slow the progression.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
the animal eye doc we seen, also said that besides going blind, she'd be in a lot of pain, due to her eyes being so dry. she said,

1) put her down
2) remove her eyes and close the area
3) surgery.. ( we did)

we don't have monthly bills or meds for her eyes.. just the normal shots, vet visits for check ups..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
we did this for her before the last step was surgery Using a specially formulated, clinically proven eye drop containing NAC or N-acetyl-carnosine

has anyone ever heard of a GSD, having this???
Although DES could affect any breed of dog there are a number of breeds that are more susceptible. These tend to include the small or miniature breeds such as: Pug, Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, Shih Tzu and Pekingese.

********
below, is full info.. about Dry Eye Syndrome (DES)


Dry Eye Syndrome (DES) or keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is a common, potentially blinding condition in dogs. If a dog is struck down with this condition it usually affects both eyes. As with humans DES in canines is the reduction of lubricating tear production. This type of tear is extremely important as it assists with clear vision.
Although DES could affect any breed of dog there are a number of breeds that are more susceptible. These tend to include the small or miniature breeds such as: Pug, Cocker Spaniel, Dachshund, Shih Tzu and Pekingese.
Should you own such a dog please ensure you take your dog for regular check ups and be aware of the initial signs of canine DES. These symptoms include discharge from the eye, conjunctivitis, inflammation of the cornea and obvious signs of distress or pain from your dog, especially if regularly pawing at its eyes.
There are various reasons as to why your dog may get DES or KCS. In the majority of cases the cause is attributed to an immune disorder which affects the tear film. Other auto-immune diseases such as Hypothyroidism or Cushing's disease can cause the condition. Other causes may include:
Canine Distemper
Viral or bacterial conjunctivitis
Trauma
Sulfonamides drugs (used for bacterial infections)
Anaesthetic agents
DES or KCS can lead to blindness in breeds such as Pug and Dachshund who are particularly prone to the chronic or most severe strain. Due to the lack of bacteria clearing, lubricating tears, the corneal surface thickens causing potential ulceration or erosion and an intolerance to light before blindness occurs.
Conventional treatment presently consists of drug therapy and/or surgery. As with the so-called treatment in humans, artificial tears or eye ointments like Cyclosporin, do not really offer much in the way of healing help as they are similar to your 'crying' tears. This type of tear does not contain the correct components for eye lubrication. Other drugs include antibiotics, hormones and mucolytics which reduce the thickness and quantity of mucous. Surgery could involve an operation to move the salivary duct from the mouth up to the eye in order to keep the eye wet by saliva rather than tears. Obviously this is not an ideal solution and it will not cure your dog's DES / KCS. Sadly there is no cure for this condition and as with humans if you have DES you have it for life.
Using a specially formulated, clinically proven eye drop containing NAC or N-acetyl-carnosine could help to prevent such conditions developing because the powerful antioxidant properties keep the eye healthy and resilient. Should you or your dog already have DES, such an eye drop could assist by giving the eye the best possible environment for self-healing.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4110313
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
dry eye is common in GSD.. I was told it could of been her blood line, since we got her from what is called a backyard breeder, we learned the hard way..


Pannus, also referred to as chronic superficial keratitis, is a chronic inflammation of the cornea and sometimes the third eyelid of both eyes. It arises as a gray, pink film that spreads across the eyes and eventually decreases the dog's vision. As the lesion progresses, superficial vessels invade the cornea and the cornea becomes opaque. With time the cornea becomes thickened and the surface may become rough and pitted.

The cause of pannus is believed to be an immune-mediated inflammation of the cornea that is made worse by external factors. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation and environmental pollution increases the severity of the condition. Dogs that live in areas of extensive sunlight, especially at high elevations tend to have the worst clinical signs. Pannus is not painful, but advanced cases may lead to blindness.

Pannus occurs only in dogs. Most affected dogs are middle-aged, but the disease can develop in young adult dogs. Pannus occurs predominantly in German shepherd dogs and German shepherd-cross dogs; it also occurs uncommonly in the greyhound, rottweiler, Belgian tervuren, Border collie, golden retriever, and Australian shepherd.



What to Watch For


<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Pannus usually begins as a somewhat symmetrical fleshy, pink-white film that begins at the lower, outer edges of the cornea of both eyes.
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Redness and tearing may be noted.
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>With time the corneas can pigment and turn dark brown.
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>White fatty deposits in the adjacent cornea may also develop.
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>The entire cornea may appear opaque.
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Vision may be decreased.
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>The third eyelid may appear thickened or become pink in color.
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>The condition is not usually painful unless it is complicated by ulceration of the cornea.

Diagnosis

Diagnostic tests are necessary to recognize pannus and to exclude other diseases, such as the following:

<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Keratoconjunctivitis sicca
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Corneal ulceration
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Corneal granulation tissue from ocular trauma
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Pigmentary keratitis
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Squamous cell carcinoma of the cornea and/or third eyelid

The diagnosis of pannus is almost always made based upon the clinical history and the appearance of the eye. Your veterinarian will usually perform a complete eye exam that includes:

<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Schirmer tear test to rule out tear deficiency (dry eye)
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Fluorescein staining to look for ulceration of the cornea
<LI class=ArticleContentBullet>Thorough examination of the eyelids and adjacent structures of the eye

Your veterinarian may elect to refer your dog to a veterinary ophthalmologist for a comprehensive eye examination, to confirm the diagnosis and to obtain advice on the best therapies to institute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,717 Posts
the animal eye doc we seen, also said that besides going blind, she'd be in a lot of pain, due to her eyes being so dry. she said,

1) put her down
2) remove her eyes and close the area
3) surgery.. ( we did)

we don't have monthly bills or meds for her eyes.. just the normal shots, vet visits for check ups..
That really answered my question. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,459 Posts
I had a foster with dry eye and applied eye drops several times a day. The common treatment is surgical, salivatory ducts are re-routed into the eye and saliva replaces tears. So when the dog is eating, more saliva is produced and it wets the eyes. Apparently she is drooling more than usual. So anything that reduces drooling would help. Have you tried Benadryl? what are the conditions that will cause the dog to drool more?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,893 Posts
Well,

I don't know a GSD that has this. But my mother does. She has had dry eye really bad for many, many years. The Christmas before last, her eye ruptured. They did surgery. They put in a patch. They eye ate the patch. The put in a cornea. The eye is attacking that as well. It has been over a year now. Her eye gets infected, and they put an contact lense in it and super antibiotics, and tears made from her blood, and experimental treatments. And it gets a little better.

They take the contact lense out. And then wait 2-4 weeks before doing the surgery, and by then it is infected again. Now there is a huge cataract, she can't see at all out of the eye, and the cataract is stuck to the retina so they will have to have a retina guy involved too when they do the surgery, if they ever do the surgery.

Sorry, I do not think that really helps all that much, but that is what dry eye did to my mom's eyes.

They put plugs in her eye ducts to preserve what tears she does have. I do not think they have ever suggested moving saliva glands up there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,459 Posts
They do the saliva gland ducts in dogs. So when the dog gets excited, instead of drooling it "tears". Drooling breeds are not my favorites, but I would not get rid of a family member of 9 years because of that. Your healthy pets might be much easier to rehome. Sounds like the 9yo was there longest.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top