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Discussion Starter #1
I've been reading up on it because i know you're not "supposed" to do it, but 90% of what I find is people saying all the exact same stuff I've always heard about it being bad for bones, joints, muscles, yada yada...and that's all fine, if it's true.

What I CANT find, is any empirical truth at all to these claims? I'm not saying it's not out there, I just wonder if there are any studies, anyone with real life experience, that can make the argument that running their dog ruined it?

Honestly--I'm inclined to believe the issue is overly inflamed...I have a 5 month old pup that is "allowed" to run himself around the yard or through fields for as long as he pleases and thats fine, but just a 7 minute, 1 mile run is going to cause permanent damage? I don't know...

To error on the safe side I have never taken him jogging--but i walk him every day for 45 mins, then at night I walk him again, then put him in the kennel and go run myself--just make things easier if he could jog with me.

I've only seen one person on this board say "everyone needs to stop worrying about it, run your puppies, i've never seen any damage done to any of mine" or something along those lines.

So aside from all the normal responses, can anyone point me to any articles/proof/studies/anecdotal evidence...anything? I'd just like to know from factual sources (not "but my vet said so") just to get the real rundown!!

Thanks!!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Found this: "Puppies – regardless of breed, size or disposition -- should not run long distance because their bones are developing and are vulnerable to malformation. Puppies enjoy bursts of exertion followed by intense rest throughout their growing years, which lasts until age two. By four months of age, your puppy may begin to trot half a mile within long walks. Increase the distance by 10 percent each week. Give the dog a day off running between those long (two mile) walks. Wait until the dog is two years old to begin distance training."

Which leads me to believe a mile jog would be fine--its not intense, its not a "long distance"
 

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It's basic science.

A professional athlete is more apt to sustain severe injury/deterioration than a normal sunday morning athlete.

Why don't you let your child weight train at 8 years old? This is because their joints and muscles are still developing, and interfering with this process isn't good.

If one person runs on pavement, and another runs on a flat grassy field, who is more apt to have knee and back problems after 5 years.

I'm sure you could search the internet for high impact training and youths and yield sufficient results. Does it really matter what type of animal it is?

Just a thought, although I'm only running on a few hours of sleep, so all cylinders aren't firing at the moment.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It's basic science.

A professional athlete is more apt to sustain severe injury/deterioration than a normal sunday morning athlete.

Why don't you let your child weight train at 8 years old? This is because their joints and muscles are still developing, and interfering with this process isn't good.

If one person runs on pavement, and another runs on a flat grassy field, who is more apt to have knee and back problems after 5 years.

I'm sure you could search the internet for high impact training and youths and yield sufficient results. Does it really matter what type of animal it is?

Just a thought, although I'm only running on a few hours of sleep, so all cylinders aren't firing at the moment.
Haha i know the feeling, and yes what you've stated I understand--but I don't see a lot of stock in it. I guess I'm referring simply to the one mile jog I do--I wouldn't consider that "training," and I planned on keeping him in the grass. I just feel like he is easily capable of it and I don't believe it would do any harm.

I wrestled competitively since I was three years old--although this isn't weight training at all, it is significant exercise. I just don't see a lot of stock in most of these claims. Children run cross country from an extremely young age these days, little boys are boxing and starting mma almost from the time they can walk, and have been for generations, in Brazil and Asian countries. The only difference I could see in dogs is how much faster they grow, but I really can't find anything proving it's bad for puppies, just claims like you made. Which until recently is how I always thought too...but lately I feel like its a lot of hearsay.
 

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I am the one that keeps telling people to get out and exercise their puppies and if that means jogging on a hard surface, that's what you do. Trotting for a dog is not a high impact motion unlike for people and they come with their own tennis shoes with their big squishy feet.

You will not find any actual evidence to the big myth of running your pup will cause long term damage, because there is none. People don't want to exercise themselves and this is a great excuse not to do it, plus breeders have been breeding such crippled dogs that they should never go jogging at any age.

So long as you aren't pushing your pup to go faster or farther, you will be just fine.
 

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How old is your pup? You would have to run pretty fast yourself to get more than a trot out of a GSD.
So I will add to your question:How fast is too fast for a puppy? Will a steady trot be detrimental to a young pup or only a full out run? I only walked my pup when he was young (and of course fetching which included running and jumping on grass) but now that he is grown I can get him to a gallop riding my bike with him. STILL I try to have him in the grass and me on the sidewalk whenever possible for cushioning. (bike attachment is semi-rigid)
 

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What about the humans that have been doing things like mentioned above since they were children, then by the time they are in their 30's are so sore and "stove up" they can barely function?

The way I see it with puppies: Why risk it? Hopefully you will have this dog for 12+ years. What is the HARM in NOT forcing exercise on it for the first year or so of it's life?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
What about the humans that have been doing things like mentioned above since they were children, then by the time they are in their 30's are so sore and "stove up" they can barely function?

The way I see it with puppies: Why risk it? Hopefully you will have this dog for 12+ years. What is the HARM in NOT forcing exercise on it for the first year or so of it's life?
The first part of this I don't agree with simply because a lot of that applies to people who used incorrect form/technique in their exercising (not to mention many of the people now in their 40's-50's were at the forefront of steroid use before the terrible effects were known ;)) but that's beside the point.

Now you're second statement IS good logic--no harm in NOT doing it, therefore not doing it equals no harm! Very true, the problem is that I would like to jog him, so I am looking for more concrete proof, i.e. "I did with my dog and he's fine" or, "I ran with my puppy and now he's paying the price."
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@Elaine -- yes you are the one I've seen pop up on this topic from time to time and I appreciate your input. I tend to agree.

@Kris, he's 5 months old, and a pretty good size boy at 23-24" and 60lbs. A jog for me wouldn't even be much of a trot for him haha.
 

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I don't see an issue with short jogs with a growing pup. I agree that almost any constructive exercise is better than no exercise at all. If your only option is to run or walk on pavement, then what choice do you have?

If you have fields available, why not run there? Follow the path of least resistance, in my opinion.

I find it hard to believe that anyone would think running on pavement is a better option than running on grass or dirt. Then again, you or your pup could tear an ACL running in a hole filled field. So in the end, at least you know what you are getting with running on concrete.

If I have the option of running my pup in a grassy field, or running on pavement, I weigh the options and do what I think is best. It's not about scientific proof (while that could have some baring on your decision).

Just have fun, and do everything in moderation!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you have fields available, why not run there? Follow the path of least resistance, in my opinion.
I'm a student at UK so, I kinda live in the middle of the city haha. But there are some really big open areas/fields around my apartment here and about 4 nights a week when I get off work it's really late so I let him run/play frisbee off leash. But so many nights after being in class then working 8 hours, a quick jog would just be sooo much easier than trying to act enthusiastic for him haha.
 

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I'm a student at UK so, I kinda live in the middle of the city haha. But there are some really big open areas/fields around my apartment here and about 4 nights a week when I get off work it's really late so I let him run/play frisbee off leash. But so many nights after being in class then working 8 hours, a quick jog would just be sooo much easier than trying to act enthusiastic for him haha.
I kinda know how ya feel. I'm in high school but I care for a 45 lb husky/beagle, a 65 lb lab mix and my shepherd girl. But I'm very enthusiastic for em. Guess I still got that kid energy haha! But I wouldn't run him yet... if it's just a trot I see no problem. But I ran Dakoda and she has been limping since :(. Stay on the safe side. She's going to the vet tomorrow, but I know it was somehow the running.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I kinda know how ya feel. I'm in high school but I care for a 45 lb husky/beagle, a 65 lb lab mix and my shepherd girl. But I'm very enthusiastic for em. Guess I still got that kid energy haha! But I wouldn't run him yet... if it's just a trot I see no problem. But I ran Dakoda and she has been limping since :(. Stay on the safe side. She's going to the vet tomorrow, but I know it was somehow the running.
Thank you for this. Hopefully all is well with Dakoda :confused:

Maybe I'll start out with a really short, very laid back jog and see how he acts about it. If it seems no fun or like an annoyance to him I'll stick to walks and playing.
 

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Thank you for this. Hopefully all is well with Dakoda :confused:

Maybe I'll start out with a really short, very laid back jog and see how he acts about it. If it seems no fun or like an annoyance to him I'll stick to walks and playing.
Thank you, so do I. That sounds like a good plan. I think that jogging should be fine, if he doesn't have to full-out run then it should be fine. But trotting should be perfectly fine.
 

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After reading this thread, I went out and ran 2 miles with my 14 month old girl. She was barely even trotting during our run. I cant believe this type of exersize could be dangerous except maybe to myself as I was ready to pass out afterward since it has been a 3-4 months since I ran. :crazy:
 

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But I ran Dakoda and she has been limping since :(. She's going to the vet tomorrow, but I know it was somehow the running.
The running in and of itself will not cause damage to your dog unless your dog has structural problems or an underlying problem that can be aggravated or you seriously over did it. Did you check her pads?
 

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The running in and of itself will not cause damage to your dog unless your dog has structural problems or an underlying problem that can be aggravated or you seriously over did it. Did you check her pads?
Ya I went over them a few times. The vet suggested that she may have pulled a muscle or twisted her leg when I called them. :/ But I'll let everyone know for sure what they say after her appt tomorrow! :)
 

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a 7 min mile may be a bit fast for pup starting out i'd think. might want to jog as opposed to run.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
a 7 min mile may be a bit fast for pup starting out i'd think. might want to jog as opposed to run.
Yea you might be right, I'm actually getting ready to take him out right now. I'll keep track of time and see what pace he likes.
 

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i got my pup at 9 weeks old. i took it very easy on him
for the first year maybe year and a half. we slowly worked our way
into long walks. by the time my dog was 2 yrs. old or so we were doing
5 mile walks. i took it easy on my dog because i didn't see any need
to push things. science and the pros may say something different
but what does your dog need to do so much at a young age for?
at 1 yrs old, 2 yrs old you're dog is young and still developing.
 
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