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Socialization of my pup is going great. I hardly find anything she is too frightened of. She’s very brave. However I got a desk vacuum that she was mortified of. https://youtu.be/pBko5KfCico is the process. The videos are probably backwards. By the end she was playing with it. I tossed treats all around it and worked her through it with the ‘touch’ command and a lot of treats. She walks by it fine now. Still gives it the side eye when it’s turned on so I’ll work more on it tomorrow. Was planning to vacuum the house tomorrow... now I’m afraid to give her a bad experience in the 8-11 week fear period risk. Is it considered a bad experience if she works through it? Did I do the right thing? I know how to take adults through fear, but not sure about the bark/growl/jump back thing she does when afraid. She also tosses in some wags and play bows. It all looks like adult dog language, but it’s all mixed up in play/fear bite/flee. I feel like I shouldn’t scold, but redirect. I’d like her to let me know how she feels and not hide it.
 

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Also should I scold the nipping the thing she’s seemingly afraid/curious of? Or just let her explore it and bark and mark when she settles, or just immediately redirect? After two Shepherd pups, thought I knew how to puppy.
 

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I'd put the puppy up when you vacuum - out of sight. But that's just me. If she still wants to bark at it in another 4 - 8 weeks, use it to teach bark on command. But for now, I'd put the pup up when you use the exciting machine.
 

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You might want to let her check it out when it's turned off.But making a big deal out of it with treats and more excitement isn't what you want to accomplish.I would crate her in another room also.When she's a little more mature I would let her observe from behind a gate being very matter of fact about it.
 

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You might want to let her check it out when it's turned off.But making a big deal out of it with treats and more excitement isn't what you want to accomplish.I would crate her in another room also.When she's a little more mature I would let her observe from behind a gate being very matter of fact about it.
So wait to toward the end of the socialization window, and try again as if it never happened?
 

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That little bus bug IS weird! So I personally would be more concerned if the puppy thought it was okay LOL! That being said, I agree with others that I wouldn't give treats or draw any attention to it. With my puppy when she was little unsure the first couple of times she saw the vacuum (and mine didn't look like a big bug 😊), but I neither put her away, nor cared less whether it spooked her or not. I just vacuumed and ignored her. Within a couple weeks I had to tell her to move so I could vacuum where she was laying.
 

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I don't see her as being afraid of it. Curious maybe, not mortified. I would not scold in that situation.

Act as though it is no big deal, and move on with life. That has helped us through many stressful situations. If I act as it doesn't matter, she sees it as a leaf blowing in the wind.

I would not treat, and praise for acting out on it. She needs to know it won't hurt her and to ignore it. This takes time. Be consistent, fair, and most importantly, patient.
 

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With every pup that we have had, 3 mixes and our boy, each one reacted the same way to the Electrolux. Attack and retreat, attack, retreat bark, puppy zoomies with much vocalizing. I really didn't think about it much and just put them up when I got tired of their shanagans so I could get the job done. It never had an impact on their temperament.

Your pup's play bow is a good sign and the only way imho that the experience could go wrong is if you chased the little one with the vacuum to continue the shanagans to a point where the pup has reason to be fearful. I know you wouldn't but I have seen that happen.

Agree with others, it isnt a big deal and put him up when you need to get the job done. It's just part of household life that he will very soon get use to.
 

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I’d like her to let me know how she feels and not hide it.
Puppies, or older dogs for that matter, do not hide their feelings about anything!

You may not understand what they're thinking or feeling, but the idea that they could or would for any reason hide their feelings is just wrong!

Also, the whole idea that one has to manage or help a puppy develop correctly is very odd to me. Socialization is about exposure, not trying to micro manage every little response the puppy may have. From my perspective even trying to understand every little thing a puppy does or may do would be not only exhausting, but totally pointless! Just relax, laugh and enjoy their explorations...it takes a pretty severe trauma to have any effect on a puppy long term. And while it may not be totally obvious all the time, your puppy is reading your every move. So your response is often more meaningful to them than the event or thing! Non issues like a vacuum, or dropping a pan on the floor accidentally, or slamming a door, should all be taken in stride, and if you do they will too eventually.

Another thing you said, OP, about "waiting to near the end of the socialization window" is IMHO something worthy of further discussion. There is a critical socialization window for puppies, but it's from about 4 to 6 or 7wks, because they have no fear yet! Again, just my opinion, but from that point on socialization is an ongoing process for all puppies. The idea that between the time you get your puppy and 16 wks you have to flood your puppy with meeting X number of people and dogs and things in order for them to be "properly" socialized has ruined more puppies than it's ever helped! Exposure to all of these can be good, along with different floor coverings, elevators, bleachers, different textures, etc. But so many people are so worried about getting this right that they forget to read their puppy and customize its exposure in a way that it really is beneficial. The really crucial thing at this early age is bonding and developing an effective dialog with your puppy. Gain trust, build engagement, and form a strong bond. These will help both of you much more than meeting a bunch of people or dogs ever will!
 

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That little bus bug IS weird! So I personally would be more concerned if the puppy thought it was okay LOL! That being said, I agree with others that I wouldn't give treats or draw any attention to it. With my puppy when she was little unsure the first couple of times she saw the vacuum (and mine didn't look like a big bug 😊), but I neither put her away, nor cared less whether it spooked her or not. I just vacuumed and ignored her. Within a couple weeks I had to tell her to move so I could vacuum where she was laying.
Same for my dog! Not only with vacuum, but also with sewer grates, men with loud leaf blowers, and other things that seemed to make him anxious. We just calmly walk by and do our thing, I don't make any special attempt to approach the scary thing OR detour around the scary thing. If he wants to approach, I let him. If he wants to move further away, I let him. After multiple exposures, he seems to get over his nervousness and he adopts my "Nothing to Fear Here" philosophy.

Even our guinea pigs became "brave". They used to run for their hidey holes at the sound of the vacuum, but after a month or two in our house, they would just amble around and graze on their hay, with me vacuuming inches from the cage! Repeated exposures with "meh, nothing happened" really seems to work with animals.
 

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I missed the link to your vacuum vid so after seeing it (cute bug) there is another point you might want to consider along with all the other suggestions. If you are using this primarily as a desk vacuum, I definitely wouldn't make a big deal out of it nor let her chase or play with it as it could encourage high counter/desk surfing later on when she gets older. Also, if she starts associating it as a play toy, when it comes time to teach her that she can't pick it up or chase it (I no your aren't doing this but just by her curiosity and you bringing attention to it via treats she's already associating it with excitement and excitement often translates to fun) then you will need to be mindful of what toys you do allow her to play with. To be fair you would have to avoid any toys that look like that counter vacuum in color, pattern and shape.

I could see her getting confused being allowed to chase, bark play with one red and black polkadot plastic toy but being told no for another. Especially if you plan to use it on small floor areas. Imho, best to let her just experience watching you use it in a matter of fact manner and redirect her attention to something else in a no big deal manner and avoid similar looking toys for a while.

Just my other side of the coin 2 pennies.
 
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