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I run/bike with my dog(s) on a daily basis. I have a question regarding the type of collar is best to use for the situation. I have used a flat collar, but at the times that I would encounter other dogs, my boys would get excited/anxious and start pulling, they nearly pull me to full speed during this time. I switched to a prong collar to control the pulling and it helped quite a bit, it stops the pulling for the most part but the pulling still occurs. I don’t like using the collar for this reason because I know that it’s not intended to control pulling, is it? I was thinking about getting a harness, is that a good way to control the pulling? Please comment…
 

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When you're running or biking with your dog, the prong collar is the best tool to prevent your dog from pulling, especially if they tend to pull or lunge when they see other dogs.

A harness wouldn't give you the same results and ability to correct your dog. Regular harnesses where the leash clips to the back actually encourage pulling since they allow the dog to really put his whole weight into pulling. A front-clip harness that is designed to stop pulling - it does that by turning the dog toward you whenever he pulls against the leash - may work as well, but IMHO would not be as safe in this type of situation as the prong.
 

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When I run or bike Kenya, she wears a Ruffwear harness b/c I like the leash on her back. The harness is attached to a thin slip collar, in case of an emergency. When DH runs her, she wears a slip collar or a Martingale. She's not as trusting of him, more likely to get spooked and bolt if something bad happened, so I don't like her running on a flat collar.
 

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I think running and biking are two really different things - at least if you're biking with an attachment. I use a springer and I bike with my dogs in a harness. They are welcome to pull and that's fine. The attachment has a sort of shock absorber and it really doesn't matter if they lunge or do something unexpected, it doesn't unbalance my bike.

When running/walking I use a collar because that's when I don't want them to pull. I use fursavers or a prong for that depending on the dog. I don't like to attach the leash to their flat collar for the same reason as Liesje - less likely to pull out, also should something happen where they get away, I want them to have ID. Never happened yet but you never know...

ETA: If you're biking with no attachment, just with the dog on leash beside you, I guess you need something to minimize pulling as much as possible. Even so, IMO, that's really dangerous. If you're holding the leash in one hand, and I'd assume you'd have to be, one minor lunge or tug and your whole steering goes kerflooey and you could wipe out - and worse, fall on your dog.

Get a bike attachment designed for biking dogs - they are wonderful and much much safer.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you, when using the prong collar while running/biking and my dog begins to lunge/react to another dog, should I correct him? If so, how much of a correction?
 

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pupresq, your wrote as I was responding to the others. Thank you for your response and recommendation. Could you point me in a direction to the attachment that you are speaking of. I do not think I have ever seen or heard of such a thing, but again, I am a newby at dog ownership. Anyways, I appreciate your input...
 

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I would NOT recommend biking with your dog on a prong collar, especially if he's lunging at other dogs when you're just running. There's no good way to give an effective leash correction on a bike and you are going to have an accident.

If he reacts to another dog while running, I would suggest working on the comman "leave it". You can do that with a leash correction and then lots of praise when he looks back at you. Better yet, you can also do it using desirable treats. I would also spend some time doing focus exercises like "watch me." There's a lot of info on this board on teaching both of those and they're very useful.

My dogs have gotten to where when they see another dog they turn away and look at me automatically. It's pretty funny.
 

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For what it's worth, when I first started biking with my dog I asked for opinions and help on this board, and it was recommended to me to use a prong if I did not have the bicycle attachment, just as a safety measure as it allows for better control.

I use a shortish leash and hold it between my hand and the handlebar, so all I have to do to let go in an emergency is to lift my hand. I can correct while on bike, but usually do not need anything other than a verbal "leave it".

This has worked very well for us, and I have not considered getting a Springer or other attachment.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
pupresq, thank you for the link to the bike attachment and the advice on working on his "leave it" and "Watch me" commands. I am definitely going to begin working on those. When you are riding with the attachment and you pass a walker with a dog, how do you keep your dog close to you. When I pass a walker with a dog, I like to hold on to the short lead so my boy is right next to me.

The prong collar has been working amazing the past few days. My dog still pulls when he sees another dog coming up, but it is very limited. I think when I introduce and begin teaching him the commands I will see an even better improvement. Thanks again all for your comments, I appreciate the insight...
 

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Like Historian I never got a Springer. However, I've done a LOT of work on Kenya's manners, walking, and ignoring everything else. She wears a harness, attached to a 6' lead. I don't hold the lead or wrap it around my wrist, I simply hold the handle bar with the lead under it. If she were to lunge, I just drop it, it's not attached to me or the bike in any way. Kenya runs right along side me, but again, I've done tons of work with her so I can verbally command her to "get out" front, turn right/left, "get back" behind, "watch me", or stop. She has never lunged while on the bike, and I don't think she's ever lunged even while walking.

I don't like the idea of dogs running or biking on a prong collar, but that's just me. IMO a prong should be used on a temporary basis, to help teach the dog how to walk loose leash. If a dog needs to have a prong on to walk with good manners, then the dog is not fully trained. I personally prefer to work on manners and have control of the dog before I tried biking or letting her run with DH. Coke is still learning how to walk with self-control, so he does not jog or bike yet. If pulling at another dog was an issue, I'd focus on that before introducing a bike, just for safety and following through on the basic training.
 

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Originally Posted By: Liesje IMO a prong should be used on a temporary basis, to help teach the dog how to walk loose leash. If a dog needs to have a prong on to walk with good manners, then the dog is not fully trained. I personally prefer to work on manners and have control of the dog before I tried biking or letting her run with DH. Coke is still learning how to walk with self-control, so he does not jog or bike yet.
When you get your eventual dog that you will raise as a SchH prospect you will find that this may not be the case and that the "temporary" period of time may be for the first year or two of their lives with you. When you raise a dog to pull you onto the field (literally) and work in front of you while pulling walking without letting them self correct on a prong is an exercise in futility.
 

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Originally Posted By: ZeusGSD
Originally Posted By: Liesje IMO a prong should be used on a temporary basis, to help teach the dog how to walk loose leash. If a dog needs to have a prong on to walk with good manners, then the dog is not fully trained. I personally prefer to work on manners and have control of the dog before I tried biking or letting her run with DH. Coke is still learning how to walk with self-control, so he does not jog or bike yet.
When you get your eventual dog that you will raise as a SchH prospect you will find that this may not be the case and that the "temporary" period of time may be for the first year or two of their lives with you. When you raise a dog to pull you onto the field (literally) and work in front of you while pulling walking without letting them self correct on a prong is an exercise in futility.
Probably. Kenya is 4 years old so she could very well have been a puller her first 2 years. Coke is almost 2 and he's still a puller, still on a prong. To me, it's important to train a dog when to pull, when to heel, when to work out in front, when to just walk alongside me on a loose leash, etc. I think a dog is fully capable of working out ahead and pulling and still being able to walk around in public in heel; I don't think training for one means the dog has to generalize that into all aspects of being on a lead. I do use prongs, but for training and correcting, not walking/jogging/biking in general.

For a dog that is primarily a pet - not doing SchH - for me to say that "I've made progress with pulling by using a prong" would mean that I can take the prong off the dog, put on a regular collar, and see progress, not that the dog only doesn't pull when the prong is on. I have nothing at all against prongs and have used them at some point on each dog (especially a crazy field lab), but I don't like to see them being used as a clutch. Using a prong in the context of training for SchH is different to me than putting one on a dog every day for a daily walk.
 
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