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Sorry for having so many questions lately! I am determined to do everything right with my next puppy haha (due to be born at the end of this month!!), so I'm doing all the research I possibly can to be fully prepared before I bring her home haha. The one thing I'm having trouble finding is just more info on how to correctly raise a puppy for house living and Schutzhund. I've got the concept of socializing as much as possible, working on engagement everywhere, redirecting playbiting to a toy or rag (as opposed to correcting the puppy), and teaching and alternate behavior (such as sit) instead of correcting the puppy for jumping. However I just want to learn more about how to raise the pup in the house to make sure it learns basic house manners (no jumping or playbiting as an adult, no acting crazy in the house, no chewing on/grabbing/running around with inappropriate objects in the house, etc etc., without diminishing the pup's drive/ability to do schutzhund. I've already watched Leerburg's Your Puppy 8 Weeks to 8 Months as well as Leerburg's Puppy Bitework Foundations. I've really been wanting his video on How to Raise a Working Puppy. Has anyone else seen this DVD and if so, do you recommend it? What other books/dvds/online articles/etc (free resources are greatly appreciated!) would you recommend to learn more about these things?

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I've seen it, it is a good step by step how to video. People who have raised multiple working puppies likely wouldn't get much, but I think it is a good resource for people even raising a puppy as a pet. Also you are going to make mistakes, probably a lot of them. I'm sure even the best handlers messed up a lot of stuff with their first puppy. Don't stress so much about doing everything "right" that you don't enjoy just having a puppy and also letting a puppy just be a puppy.
 

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I've seen it, it is a good step by step how to video. People who have raised multiple working puppies likely wouldn't get much, but I think it is a good resource for people even raising a puppy as a pet. Also you are going to make mistakes, probably a lot of them. I'm sure even the best handlers messed up a lot of stuff with their first puppy. Don't stress so much about doing everything "right" that you don't enjoy just having a puppy and also letting a puppy just be a puppy.
Oh okay cool, thank you! And yeah, that was one problem with my last dog... I didnt let him just be a puppy, so I'm definitely gonna do that with my next one.

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Pay attention to your puppies temperament and that will give you the right plan. In general, what I find the most helpful is to keep a certain separation between your house manners and your formal obedience. I don't train anything at home as far as formal/IPO, whatever you do. Everything has a clear beginning and a clear ending. Its simple, I take him somewhere, tell him "Ready" and we play and train. When I'm done, I say "Done" and we move off and walk around, go home, whatever were going to do at that point.

All I want them to do at home is settle and relax. I don't want them to expect play or anything like that at home. They still act like any other dog at home, but its easier for everything I want to have that little bit of clear difference of when and where its time to open up all that drive.

One thing I do at home because its not too different then any other feeding, is I'll scatter food around on my lawn and let them sniff for it. At some point I go ahead and scuff out a scent pad for it to encourage them using their nose. Something I learned the hard way is not to track alone any more then you have to. So as soon as you're ready to start with tracking, it'll be better if you know someone with experience through the club. You aren't alone when you trial, so having someone walk the track with you, other dogs or people around is important. I think its a different type of distraction that I don't wait to introduce.

The first game I introduce is two ball. People use it for different things, some don't use it at all. I use it to create a pattern of running back to me. Just a little foundation for recalls and retrieves.

Play with her a lot, in as many different places as you can. I think that's the most helpful way to keep them from checking out on you, kind of like what you saw with her sire.
 

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Pay attention to your puppies temperament and that will give you the right plan. In general, what I find the most helpful is to keep a certain separation between your house manners and your formal obedience. I don't train anything at home as far as formal/IPO, whatever you do. Everything has a clear beginning and a clear ending. Its simple, I take him somewhere, tell him "Ready" and we play and train. When I'm done, I say "Done" and we move off and walk around, go home, whatever were going to do at that point.

All I want them to do at home is settle and relax. I don't want them to expect play or anything like that at home. They still act like any other dog at home, but its easier for everything I want to have that little bit of clear difference of when and where its time to open up all that drive.

One thing I do at home because its not too different then any other feeding, is I'll scatter food around on my lawn and let them sniff for it. At some point I go ahead and scuff out a scent pad for it to encourage them using their nose. Something I learned the hard way is not to track alone any more then you have to. So as soon as you're ready to start with tracking, it'll be better if you know someone with experience through the club. You aren't alone when you trial, so having someone walk the track with you, other dogs or people around is important. I think its a different type of distraction that I don't wait to introduce.

The first game I introduce is two ball. People use it for different things, some don't use it at all. I use it to create a pattern of running back to me. Just a little foundation for recalls and retrieves.

Play with her a lot, in as many different places as you can. I think that's the most helpful way to keep them from checking out on you, kind of like what you saw with her sire.
Thank you for all the advice! I did eventually get her sire motivated with food, but my biggest problem with him was house manners (mainly marking, grabbing/chewing inappropriate objects, and just acting crazy in general lol), so I really want my next puppy to be a good house dog

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You teach her those manners like you would any other dog. If potty training and behaving in the house is going to ruin them for sport, they weren't going to make it anyway.
Obviously I'd treat house training the same way, but normally I would correct a normal house dog for play biting, chewing, and jumping, but from what I've read so far you arent supposed to correct a working pup for those, just redirect and teach alternate behaviors?

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I bought the video years ago and was not that impressed. You might want to reconsider how much time you are going to let your pup stay in the house because theret will be a constant need to supervise and that becomes tiresome and can lead to frustration/irritability toward the pup. A high drive pup will result in at least some destruction. Some good books are "Purely Positive Training" and "Schutzhund-Training in Drive." Be prepared to take some abuse.
 

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I don't know if Dave has anything on his site about this, but you can check out what videos are available without paying, I believe.
https://www.davekroyer.com/videos
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I bought the video years ago and was not that impressed. You might want to reconsider how much time you are going to let your pup stay in the house because theret will be a constant need to supervise and that becomes tiresome and can lead to frustration/irritability toward the pup. A high drive pup will result in at least some destruction. Some good books are "Purely Positive Training" and "Schutzhund-Training in Drive." Be prepared to take some abuse.
Thank you for the book recommendations! After my last dog, I do know what to expect, and I will still be utilizing the crate for breaks, but I would like her to spend more time outside of the crate than my last pup.

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If you don't have a fenced in yard, have you considered a chain link kennel enclosure so the pup can give you a break and not be in the crate?
 

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I believe it was Koehler who advised giving your puppy a room or area where it was free to do whatever it pleased. The theory is that over the course of it's life your dog will hear NO a thousand times, give it a space and some time when it never, ever hears that. In other words, let it be a dog.
Since you want to learn, whether you like his training methods or not, I highly recommend reading Koehlers books. His theories and ideas are solid and the broader your foundation is the better off you will be.

No handler or trainer is perfect. I stopped showing horses when it became a job and try as I might I have never gotten that passion back, it makes me sad. Never let your dog become a chore.
 

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I believe it was Koehler who advised giving your puppy a room or area where it was free to do whatever it pleased. The theory is that over the course of it's life your dog will hear NO a thousand times, give it a space and some time when it never, ever hears that. In other words, let it be a dog.
Since you want to learn, whether you like his training methods or not, I highly recommend reading Koehlers books. His theories and ideas are solid and the broader your foundation is the better off you will be.

No handler or trainer is perfect. I stopped showing horses when it became a job and try as I might I have never gotten that passion back, it makes me sad. Never let your dog become a chore.
Interesting idea. I'll definitely look into Koehler's books, thank you for the advice!

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How about a spare bedroom?
Oooh, I totally forgot about that. We've been using it as storage haha. Maybe I could move the bed and futon up against the wall to make a space for that. Idk how I didnt think of that lol. Thank you so much for the very obvious idea bahaha!

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They now sell some very simple portable dog runs that I have used effectively inside the house. That way if you need the room you just move the run and you still have the area outside the run as storage if needed.

Years ago I had a 4x8 dog run sitting on a sheet of plywood that I stapled cheap vinyl flooring to. I used it as a puppy pen.
 
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