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Discussion Starter #1
http://youtu.be/K-5Ez86SghQ


How do i fix this? I cant take things away from him once he takes it to his bed without getting physical. If i take it away before he reaches his bed then hes fine. hes not just barking. if you reach in, he will bite and bite hard!
 

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Take away his bed. Practice NILIF. You are the owner of everything in the house. Don't get physical, he can win so don't engage.

Is the resource guarding just with toys?
 

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I can't post links with this tablet, but google mind games and search here there are tons of posts about resource guarding. I have 2 that guard from each other and other animals but not from me. They will give snarly faces to each other maybe a little bark but not like that. If its a really high value item like a bone I have to trick Apache, I will say ok let's go out, as he tries to go out with the bone I tell him "leave it" and he will drop it. I would not allow your dog to have anything unless you give it to him, then I would safely practice trading games.
 

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Resource guarding - YouTube


How do i fix this? I cant take things away from him once he takes it to his bed without getting physical. If i take it away before he reaches his bed then hes fine. hes not just barking. if you reach in, he will bite and bite hard!

No more bed then! Remove his access (or get rid of it altogether). Have him *earn* his freedom and right to have certain objects.
 

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Quite scary looking, indeed.

How do grab his leash, or remove him from that corner?

First thing I would do is remove his little corner. No toys, no bed, nothing to guard.

No dog will EVER tell me where I can and can't go.

Then, I would look into what others have to say about dealing with the issue itself.

BTW.... Your reactions are feeding the behavior. It's almost as if you're encouraging it.
 

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I don't doubt that he will bite. You have a leash on him. That's a good first start. He is in a corner surrounded by things that creates a very protective den-like situation for him. Remove his bed from that corner. I don't think you need to remove his bed altogether; you can practice moving it all over the place. One morning he might have his bed in the middle of a room, the next evening he might have it somewhere else. Not a static "this is my bed" spot, but a "this is where you lay" sort of idea. Remove all those toys lying around. Keep that leash on him. If he is not obedience trained, start a military like attitude with your lifestyle; training and train at the club, in your yard, and include inside your house. Even if your house is small, you make sure your training is consistent, rewarding for him, and start drilling him. Sit, down, come, sit, up, finish, heel all in the space of your home. Don't think of this so much about telling him no, or stopping a negative behavior. Turn your mind the other way and consider showing him what "to do" in life. What is life in my home, what is life during our walks, etc... In the absence of direction, dogs just make up **** on their own. I agree with the above posters. NILIF all the way but make sure that engaging you isn't a negative, but a rewarding, fun positive life. Off to work now...
 

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When I watched the video, I had a different idea of what's going on. When you're saying, "Can I have it?" it sounds like you're laughing and you've made a game out of this. I doubt you intended for this to be the result, but now that you have, it's time to change the game before it gets out of hand. Teaching 'drop it' and 'leave it' are very important. He's still a puppy and you definitely don't want this behavior to escalate.
 

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What others said. No more bed, all of those toys and various things would be put away and he would be kept out of that corner. And I'd start playing trading games with him and making him earn every single piece of food. Leash would be attached to me.
 

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Everything goes into the garbage. No more toys, bones or treats. No more dog bed or freedom or feeding out of a bowl. If they are not with me, they are crated. It is hardcore NILIF.

They are literally stripped off everything and I make them so dependent on me that they will eat out of my hand or else they will not get a single piece of food. Little by little they earn their freedom. If they fall back into old behavior, I start all over again.
 

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This would not fly in my house.

Like others have stated.... Remove everything. Toys, bed, and if he still shows that reaction in that "den" he's made..... block that off too! He gets NOTHING, unless he earns it. Crate him whenever he can't be attached to you... put a longer leash on him so you don't have to get by his face if he acts out.

I would definitely start hardcore NILIF (Nothing In Life Is Free) in that house!

Before this gets even more out of control, it's time to put a stop to it. He can have everything back when he's decided to play nice and step down. You're the owner, you own the home, and YOU control his life... not him.
 

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:eek:

That really is scary.
You have already received excellent advice.
Have no toys for him lying around. Give them, and when play time is over, they get put away.
NILIF immediately. You call the shots, not him.
 

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NILIF works great. I did this when I was working on training Lily. I noticed a huge diffrence in the way she looked at me, she was finally looking at me as her leader. Even though she is pretty much trained, as far as companion pet goes, I still dont let her have her toys unless I am playing with her. The toys and fun stuff come from me. The only thing "toy like" that she gets without me is a bully bone or her kong. She gets no tug toys, squeak toys, balls, etc without me involved either as a play session or as a reward for good behavior.
 

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When I watched the video, I had a different idea of what's going on. When you're saying, "Can I have it?" it sounds like you're laughing and you've made a game out of this.

my first impression as well but gave the poster the benefit of the doubt.


you could always exploit this and enter him in an object guarding competition :laugh:
 

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my first impression as well but gave the poster the benefit of the doubt.


you could always exploit this and enter him in an object guarding competition :laugh:

was my impression too, and it made me laugh, but assumed that it was to elicit the response poster wanted us to see besides the fact that the real issue isn't a laughing matter :blush:
 

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all seems a bit suspect to me, has the OP even acknowledged any responses on this thread??? he has been give some great advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hello all. I've actually read the responses and i am very grateful for the advice but i respectfully disagree with NILIF so i havent responded until now.

first off, my voice is just naturally high. i dont have this low booming voice. also when i say stuff in an upbeat manner it seems to work better. if i come at him with a stern low voice he immediately gets aggressive because he knows what im there for.

anyways i disagree with NILIF because taking his toy away and locking him in his crate makes him associate you + crate as negative. he doesnt really wanna give up his toy. he just does it because he doesnt wanna get locked up. also when hes crazy like that, i'd like to see any of you try to get him into his crate. i wanted a dog that when i took something from them, they WANT to give it up. not because they have to. if im at a bbq and a friend unknowingly threw him a cooked rib bone and i went to take it away and he growls because its super duper high value treat then what? stand there and threaten to crate him? pop his prong until he lets go?

i fixed the problem in 4 sessions just by using positive methods. i approached him with a treat. when he grows i got no closer and threw it to him. eventually he'd let me be right next to him without any signs of aggression. finally i could take the toy away and trade him a treat and lots of praise. by the end i would praise and only give treats ever so often.

i actually dont even own a crate. hes had free run of the house since 8 months old. hes really well behaved while the family is at work during the day. we have a shoe rack with lots of shoes and he doesnt even touch it. he doesnt even get on the furniture. but sometimes (mostly in the early morning when im too lazy to wake up at 6) he will get bored and grab something to chew on. i'd have to get up and take it from him. over time i guess he associated me approaching his bed as negative and im always taking stuff away. now he wants me to approach his bed. its a positive experience for him. resource guarding fixed without taking all of his toys and things away and being strict. point is there is more than one way to train/fix problems other than being "alpha"
 

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Discussion Starter #18
http://youtu.be/56sq65tlcak

There is the video of the solution. when i reached out to grab it, he lets go before i could finishing saying out. he wanted to let go. not because he has to.

i didnt make this thread as a joke. he honestly had some serious resource guarding issues. i just didnt agree with NILIF so i seeked advice elsewhere. its amazing how a vicious aggressive dog in the first video can turn into a nice calm dog in the second video (in 2 days) just by changing the way he was thinking. i appreciate all the advice and hopefully people who have dogs with resource guarding can see that it can be fixed.
 

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anyways i disagree with NILIF because taking his toy away and locking him in his crate makes him associate you + crate as negative. he doesnt really wanna give up his toy. he just does it because he doesnt wanna get locked up. also when hes crazy like that, i'd like to see any of you try to get him into his crate. i wanted a dog that when i took something from them, they WANT to give it up. not because they have to. if im at a bbq and a friend unknowingly threw him a cooked rib bone and i went to take it away and he growls because its super duper high value treat then what? stand there and threaten to crate him? pop his prong until he lets go?

You don't understand NILIF. It's not a punishment or something to be done when they aren't behaving and only then. It's an all the time thing with anything. Also, putting him in a crate as a "time out" done properly (as in not showing anger) does not create a negative association with your or the crate.

What everyone on this thread advocated was controling his resources, time and space to teach him that you are the person who gives it to him and that you being around those things is GOOD. Not punishing him by locking him away in a crate. Actually, no one in this thread even mentioned correcting him.

As others have said, his behavior is part of a game. It very clearly is to him in the video. He picked up the bear and showed it to you in order to get you to try and take it away so he could growl. You've successfully rewarded him for that. It's fun now.

Your other video is private.
 

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I didn't see a vicious aggressive dog, I saw a puppy that was barking and growling. I didn't mean to insult you, and if that's how you took my comment then I apologize that it came across that way. I still think teaching 'drop it' is very important, especially for instances like you brought up, at a bbq. I don't know why you'd think this can't be fun - I constantly reinforce this command while my puppy's playing with his flirt pole. He loves to 'drop it' because that's when the game starts.

I'd like to see the other video, if you can un-private it.
 
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