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Discussion Starter #1
I do rescue and will take a max of two rescue dogs at once, regardless of age or sex.

I also have a high end GSD, meaning I paid a low 4 figures for Timber as a pup.

I am wondering if any other rescue folks are in my situation. For example, my so called high end GSD is protective and intelligent. If Timber ever died there is no question in my mind, I would go back to my breeder to get another European German Shepherd male.

However, I was going to get a female dog from the same breeder, whom I have a lot of confidence in. Then my son said, "what is wrong with your rescue, Paris." The answer was nothing, aside from the name, so now I have another forever dog.

Beyond that, despite adopting Paris I promised my rescue group I would continue to serve as a rescue for the GSD breed.

When we do home visits people will sometimes ask me about Timber, the more expensive dog. So I try and give them the postive and negative about both dogs, but on balance the high end GSD, Timber, is my favorite.

Timber's biggest drawback is he is to protective. The rescues, not quite as smart, but mostly very friendly and they do make nice pets.

Both Timber, and the rescue dogs are companion dogs.

Does anyone on the rescue board have both types of dogs, and would be willing to provide comments.
 

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yes, i have both purebred shepherds who cost a bundle (2) and rescues (3) who are actually shepherd mixes. it's been my experience that a dog's level of intelligence or soundness of temperment is not decided by whether they're purchased from a breeder or rescued. all dogs are very individual, even within a breed, but just as parents favor certain kids, i think we all tend to have our "favorites", for whatever the reason. i do think that the gratifications that come with a successful rescue are enormous, and that all my dogs have positives and negatives which combine to make them uniquely my dogs, and i love both my packs, for different reasons but no, not equally. but i think that has more to do with having had both serablue and the cashman since they were babies and raising them, so maybe i don't love them more, i'm just closer to them. timber1 thanks for fostering for rescue, there are so many in need!

ps...i kinda like the name paris, i just try to associate it with the romance of the city of lights and not with some silly young blond girl with way too many dollars and not enough sense.
 

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Oh boy, Timber you know my situation right now, with a high-end SchH female and my rescue, lol. I will refrain right now, lol.

Just trying to keep things lite!!!!
 

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I guess all I have to say is....I need to clear up a misconception. Poor bred, puppymill, backyard bred GSD's are not the only dogs that end up in rescue.

ANY GSD can end up in rescue....from a "high end" GSD from a "great" breeder....to a puppy mill dog. I have seen dogs shipped from Europe, police dogs, dogs with titles.......etc.....

The reasons dogs end up in rescue can vary greatly.....from "issues".......to owner dying.

Please don't assume a dog in rescue is not a "quality" dog......

(although to me...they are all quality : )
 

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What she said! Thanks Katieliz and Myamom for adding that perspective.

Our group sets-up and information table at one or more GSD club event every year. I've had breeders gush over my Roxy . . . until they find out she was adopted through a GSD rescue. We've had imports with 4 and 5 (in the 10s of thousands! dumped) figure price tags and kennel names from some of the "top" breeders come through our foster homes.

Some of the most challenging dogs are those that may have come from high-end lines but were sold to someone who didn't know what they were getting. We all know what a handful any dog can be without the right training and stimulation - imagine a working line dog kept in a garage or drug house for years. It really becomes all about nature AND nurture.

"Rescue dog" is easy shorthand to describe these dogs, but rescue doesn't breed them; they all came from some type of breeder at one point. Many are from backyard breeders, but not all. For me, the real high-end dogs are those that come from truly responsible breeders who are committed to their dogs for a lifetime. It's been really refreshing to find several of those on this forum!
 

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My thanks to those of you who jumped in to clear the misconception about rescue dogs. I do not foster for rescues so perhaps I should stay out of this posting, but I do have a rescue dog and I do help connect people wanting dogs to the dogs I know of in shelters or rescues.

My girl Skye, her littermates, mother and other dogs were rescued from a puppy mill. Had I wanted a dog for confirmation, Skye would not have worked for me. I didn't. I wanted a dog to work with me in obedience and hopefully have the potential to become a therapy dog.


Skye is now 4 1/2 - for over three years she has been my demo dog in classes twice a week. She is amazing - people ask me where I got her and if she will ever have pups. Instead of becoming upset, I take the opportunity to explain about rescue dogs, spay and neutering programs and all the ways that rescued animals can enrich their lives.

Skye is also a certified therapy dog - in that capacity her great temperament allows her to be wonderful with small children in libraries all the way up to alzheimers patients. She volunteers with me 12 to 15 hours a month.


As some of you have mentioned, quality dogs are often found in rescue. Also less than perfect dogs with wonderful temperaments - my vets love to see my rescue dogs (3 in all) come in because they are all so easy to work with.

I resent and am frustrated by those who compare rescues to 'purchased dogs' in a way that makes them sound bad. Dogs in rescue sometimes have tattoos from those high end breeders. Or they can have the misfortune to be born in a mill as Skye was and have a soft ear and long legs.

I will stack her intelligence and temperament up to the high end dog any day. Grant you - we won't be seen in a confirmation trial.


I for one am glad I rescued a dog. I got exactly what I wanted.

Thank you, Miss Skye for bettering my world.
 

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I have 3 W. German dogs from breeders and a W. German rescue. They all have nice drive and I would say their intelligence level is pretty similar. Of course there are differences with each but I would not say that "generally, rescues are not as smart" as I have found that not to be the case. I have fostered quite a few GSD's for local rescues. You have to look at each dog individually.
 

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I've always had rescues but one was from W. German lines and had a very nice pedigree with Schs all over the place. I'm sure he was expensive. He was owned by two doctors and abused and seriously neglected by the husband. He was a wonderful dog (he had a lot of issues to get through, of course) and I loved him very much. However, he was not the smartest of the dogs I've had. He did, however, teach ME a great deal about patience and training. He was not, however, higher quality than any of my other dogs.

The smartest dog I've ever had is Chama, a rottweiler crossed with a mutt. She was born under a shed. She is off the charts in intelligence. She's also very independent and a bit timid. It takes her two repetitions to learn anything. She has a fan club.

Rafi is very intelligent and wants to please me more than anything in the world. He is wonderful with people and easily learns good habits to replace bad ones. He is always happy, loves to play and is ready to accompany me anywhere, anytime.

Kai was extremely intelligent and caught onto things very quickly. He was high drive and revved a bit too high so I had to modify my training style to accommodate him.

My first dog was amazing in temperament and in personality. Everyone was in awe of her. She intuited everything; I rarely had to give her commands.

All of my dogs have been wonderfully devoted to me and well loved by others who know them.


I've provided these brief biographies because it illustrates what others have said, that all dogs are different and should be appreciated for who they are. I've learned a tremendous amount from every dog I've had the privilege of spending time with.

I used to say that my first dog, Massie--adopted at 10 weeks old from a shelter-- was my heart dog but now I feel that are all my heart dogs. I love them all equally and there are no second class citizens around here.
 

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Bonnie
 

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We had a rescue come in that was pulled from the pound. Tatooed, titled, conformation rating. Wonderful dog!

I took in a puppy found on the side of the road as a rescue. I named her Divvie-- as in My Husband is Going to Divorce Me if I Bring Home Another Dog.
She is what I call a "nuffer"-- enough of a German Shepherd that she got an ILP number. Placed her with a lady who had just lost her "high-end" GSD. She is now number 12 on the list of agility GSDs in the nation.

A club member took in a malinois from the local pound, she now has her CGC, RN, RA, RE, CD and HIC,
 

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Mary-very neat!!!

I don't have a high end dog here-in terms of what I paid for them originally, bloodlines, etc. So I have nothing to compare them to of my very own. I have mixes and PB GSDs all living together-they don't even know that there are those that walk among with them with actual pedigrees!

But in general I find that dogs, like people, have varying degrees of and different types of intelligences and drives. Also, like us, if you have to go through a lot, some of those things are pushed down until a time when you don't have to worry about basic needs and can actually do what you were meant to do.

And I have met rescues who were expensive or well bred (and sometimes even both). There is no type of GSD immune from needing rescue.

I think we get out of dogs what we put into them. Any reaction of them to me is a reflection of what I do or don't do.

[Congratulations to you and Paris-with time she will exceed your expectations!]
 

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Hi Timber,

I think in your case since you and I foster for a rescue that rescues alot of white gsd's it brings up this question. Alot of people associate a german shepherd dog as a black and tan saddle back. So any other color they get confused.
I think if any of us had a rescue dog from pup on it would we a more fair question. I will let you know, as my rescue pup will be here soon and after 2 yrs I will let you know. LOL!
 

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Oh I was not meaning to imply that rescues are of less value. I guess I meant that you do not know what to expect or what you are getting....but this can happen with great pedigrees, I am sure.

I love my high end and am growing to really love my rescue...even if he has issues, lol.

They are all worthy of care and love.....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
A big thanks to everyone that replied. Every single comment is constructive and helpful.

I am probably a bit prejudiced toward Timber, because I got him as a pup, and being retired, and at the time my only dog, he got plenty of training and exercise.

I have only had four rescues, and never a rescue pup. But every rescue has been great, and the last two very well cared for. I often wonder why the prior owners gave up the dogs.

Again, I really appreciate the feedback.
 

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I have seen some high end $ dogs not worth a dime.

I am very unimpressed withthe amt paid. If too hig I actually see it as a red flag that the buyer has been taken.

It is not unusual for the first dog to be the favorite. I do not think it has much to do with the price tag.
 

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I have two GSD's of my own and I do rescue. One of my own dogs came to me from a byb, at 6 weeks of age. He and his litter-mate were the "left overs" and surrendered to the shelter I worked at, along with the Momma dog. I fostered until pups were 8 weeks old and available for adoption. Momma was a German import (working lines) and Dad was an American line byb-type dog. I adopted my Jackson and have kept in touch with the adopters of Abby, his litter-mate. These are fantastic dogs. Jackson is social and very well behaved with people of all ages and types. He is also wonderful with other animals. Abby is just as nice. Great dogs.
My other GSD, Tanner, was purchased as a puppy from a well known breeder. He is from fantastic West German showlines. I paid a hefty chunk of change for him. He has had health issues from the day he got off the plane. He is fearful of other dogs, showing intense aggression as a result. He bit me in a show of redirected aggression a couple of months ago. He is not steady or reliable.
I just don't think price has a whole lot to do with it. At least, it hasn't in my experience. I have fostered some really, really nice German Shepherd Dogs over the years. Some have been very well bred. A dog can end up in rescue or a shelter for a lot of different reasons. It doesn't mean that at some point in that dog's life someone didn't pay a lot for it.
Sheilah
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You all make a lot of sense, and as I mentioned my rescues have been great.

As for my breeder, the same. She has been wonderful and so has the dog.

So I have the expensive GSD, and have adopted a rescue named Paris.

I could go on forever, but the bottom line is I will continue to do rescue, and appreciate my breeder for giving me a great GSD.
 

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Originally Posted By: MyoungHi Timber,

I think in your case since you and I foster for a rescue that rescues alot of white gsd's it brings up this question. Alot of people associate a german shepherd dog as a black and tan saddle back. So any other color they get confused.
I think if any of us had a rescue dog from pup on it would we a more fair question. I will let you know, as my rescue pup will be here soon and after 2 yrs I will let you know. LOL!
I have adopted puppies and adults. I fostered a working line sable puppy and he was amazing and kept me entertained day and night. Shortly thereafter I fostered a gsd x rott puppy and he was also amazing-smart as a whip and the most wonderful temperament you can imagine!

I can't say that I have loved or appreciated the puppies or adults more than the other. I had to completely change my lifestyle to accommodate Basu (he was fear aggressive because of his past abuse) but I loved him just as much as Chama who has really been about the easiest dog you can imagine.

Rafi has only been here with me for 5 months and I have totally been in love with him since the day we got home from Cincinnati. They are all very special, each in their own way.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I must admit, if I had a rescue pup I would probably keep the dog. And that would not be a good decision on my end.
 

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Timber1
Don't you have a lot of aggression issues with your boy? I was suprised you are still so positive on the breeder. Do you think it was more an enviornmental problem rather than genetic?

I ask because a friend has paid a high price for a problem dog but her household is wild. Hard to know if the problem originated with the breeder or family.
 
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