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We adopted a beautiful bi-color GSD and the shelter tells us today when picking him up, after choosing him and waiting 3 days for him to be neutered. The owner who dumped him for "high energy" said he is 2. The shelter vet and us think a little younger than that and his feet are huge, but clean, white, adult teeth. But we will go with 2 because that is what was told.

We will take him to our vet for tx. Is there any of these meds that shoukd not be used on a GSD? He is on a daily pill right now, something I haven't heard of, maybe an antibiotic (not Doxycycline) unless it is under a different name. The meds are in the room where he is resting in his kennel so don't want to disturb. He was just neutered today and he is so active so want him to rest while healing.

Probiotics? Is there any type of probiotics or supplement that you recommend be given during tx? He seems really happy and healthy and a busy body except for the HW. He already sits for treats and ignores the cats, so he is gonna be awesome. Can't wait to get him to our local club for evaluation!
 

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Do you know if the other pill is a steroid? My pup recv'd HW treatment. He was on Doxy and steroids and had the immiticide shots. The most important thing during HW treatment recovery is to keep him quiet. Crate rest, or confined area. Outside on leash, only. It is very, very important that you do this, as the worms are dying off.
 

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Simplief, an antibiotic for skin infection, but I don't see any skin issues. He will need to be drugged to keep quiet, lol. Kidding!
 

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There are two different types of treatment for heartworm. The slow one, as implied, takes much longer but it is easier on the dog and allows for excercise. Talk to the vet.
 

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if you have a good vet, trust their advice.

Heartworms are not the end of the world.
 

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Thank you for adopting a HW+ dog!!! Your dog is young and strong, and it sound like he's not displaying any clinical signs of the disease (hacking cough or shortness of breath, for example), so he's probably very early in the disease progression. That's a good thing -- it will make the treatment a lot easier.

I'd like to suggest that you read everything you can about the American HW Society's treatment protocol. It's not the only way to treat it, but it's the "gold standard." When you have vet appointments, knowing this treatment protocol well will help you constantly compare your vet's recommendation to the "gold standard" so that you can have an open dialogue about why your vet may choose to vary from it (there are sometimes good reasons to vary from the protocol, but they should be discussed in a frank dialogue so that you can be part of the decision-making process with your vet). Here's the website:
https://www.heartwormsociety.org/veterinary-resources/american-heartworm-society-guidelines

Here are some thoughts for you....

1. Some shelters use minocycline instead of doxy. The reason is doxy has become very expensive due to a fake shortage created by the generic drug manufacturers to allow them jack the price up about 100x from what it used to cost, so the shelters are reaching for a similar drug that's cheaper.

Per the protocol, the dog is typically put on a pretty high dose of Doxy for 30 days prior to the first immiticide injection. To get reasonable prices on Doxy, you can ask your vet about ordering from a compounding pharmacy -- if you need suggestions for national compounding pharmacies, I'd be happy to offer some. The pharmacies all require the vet to do the ordering for you, so your vet will have to be on board with this to save you money. They compounding pharmacies can make a 400 mg chicken-flavored quad-tab that can be cut in half -- very convenient for most GSD-sized dogs!

I've personally never heard of using Simplicef (Cefpodoxime) to treat HW -- my guess is that it's maybe being used post-neutering to minimize the risk of infection (unrelated to HW)? Or maybe they found a little staph on him when they shaved him for neutering? I would ask the vet about this. Your vet might be waiting to start the Doxy until after the other med is done.

I like to use a probiotic when they're on antibiotics -- esp. because the doxy dose is high, and they're on it a long time. We give it at the midpoint between the two doses. It's a waste to give it with the antibiotic (it kills the probiotic bacteria), so it takes some juggling to give it in the middle of the day if you work. You can ask your vet to give you a trusted probiotic with the Doxy RX--that's very common in most practices now.

2. Since you plan to do the fast-kill treatment with immiticide, plan to ask for pain meds to go home with the dog following the injection if your vet doesn't automatically offer them -- those shots HURT. It's normal for the dog to be in pretty serious pain for 2-3 days after the injections (sometimes they barely wanting to get up because they are so sore from the shot). I think the pain meds make this part of the ordeal easier on them.

3. Start working on a plan to entertain the dog in a low-key, calm way. Google "crate games" for some fun ideas. Also, you can look up how to play some "find-it" games around the house. Even trick training is a great way to pass the time. Anything to keep the mind active while the body is calm.

I've taken several dogs through fast-kill treatment in rescue. We haven't needed to drug any of them to keep them calm, even the adolescents. You can do this!

4. You may want to ask the vet about his or her thoughts on the very new (2014) research performed by a team that included a former member of the HW Society that showed that Doxy + Advantage Multi (NOT Heartguard) is effective at killing young adult heartworms. This research is groundbreaking, as the conventional wisdom was that only immiticide could kill adult HWs -- Advantage Multi is shaking up that long-held view because it's metabolized differently than the other preventatives. Here's the cite to share with your vet:

Chandrashekar et al., Experimental Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs: Effects of
doxycycline and Advantage Multi® administration on immature adult parasites, Veterinary Parasitology 206 (2014) 93–98
 

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Thank you for adopting a HW+ dog!!! Your dog is young and strong, and it sound like he's not displaying any clinical signs of the disease (hacking cough or shortness of breath, for example), so he's probably very early in the disease progression. That's a good thing -- it will make the treatment a lot easier.

I'd like to suggest that you read everything you can about the American HW Society's treatment protocol. It's not the only way to treat it, but it's the "gold standard." When you have vet appointments, knowing this treatment protocol well will help you constantly compare your vet's recommendation to the "gold standard" so that you can have an open dialogue about why your vet may choose to vary from it (there are sometimes good reasons to vary from the protocol, but they should be discussed in a frank dialogue so that you can be part of the decision-making process with your vet). Here's the website:
https://www.heartwormsociety.org/veterinary-resources/american-heartworm-society-guidelines

Here are some thoughts for you....

1. Some shelters use minocycline instead of doxy. The reason is doxy has become very expensive due to a fake shortage created by the generic drug manufacturers to allow them jack the price up about 100x from what it used to cost, so the shelters are reaching for a similar drug that's cheaper.

Per the protocol, the dog is typically put on a pretty high dose of Doxy for 30 days prior to the first immiticide injection. To get reasonable prices on Doxy, you can ask your vet about ordering from a compounding pharmacy -- if you need suggestions for national compounding pharmacies, I'd be happy to offer some. The pharmacies all require the vet to do the ordering for you, so your vet will have to be on board with this to save you money. They compounding pharmacies can make a 400 mg chicken-flavored quad-tab that can be cut in half -- very convenient for most GSD-sized dogs!

I've personally never heard of using Simplicef (Cefpodoxime) to treat HW -- my guess is that it's maybe being used post-neutering to minimize the risk of infection (unrelated to HW)? Or maybe they found a little staph on him when they shaved him for neutering? I would ask the vet about this. Your vet might be waiting to start the Doxy until after the other med is done.

I like to use a probiotic when they're on antibiotics -- esp. because the doxy dose is high, and they're on it a long time. We give it at the midpoint between the two doses. It's a waste to give it with the antibiotic (it kills the probiotic bacteria), so it takes some juggling to give it in the middle of the day if you work. You can ask your vet to give you a trusted probiotic with the Doxy RX--that's very common in most practices now.

2. Since you plan to do the fast-kill treatment with immiticide, plan to ask for pain meds to go home with the dog following the injection if your vet doesn't automatically offer them -- those shots HURT. It's normal for the dog to be in pretty serious pain for 2-3 days after the injections (sometimes they barely wanting to get up because they are so sore from the shot). I think the pain meds make this part of the ordeal easier on them.

3. Start working on a plan to entertain the dog in a low-key, calm way. Google "crate games" for some fun ideas. Also, you can look up how to play some "find-it" games around the house. Even trick training is a great way to pass the time. Anything to keep the mind active while the body is calm.

I've taken several dogs through fast-kill treatment in rescue. We haven't needed to drug any of them to keep them calm, even the adolescents. You can do this!

4. You may want to ask the vet about his or her thoughts on the very new (2014) research performed by a team that included a former member of the HW Society that showed that Doxy + Advantage Multi (NOT Heartguard) is effective at killing young adult heartworms. This research is groundbreaking, as the conventional wisdom was that only immiticide could kill adult HWs -- Advantage Multi is shaking up that long-held view because it's metabolized differently than the other preventatives. Here's the cite to share with your vet:

Chandrashekar et al., Experimental Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs: Effects of
doxycycline and Advantage Multi® administration on immature adult parasites, Veterinary Parasitology[/Uw] 206 (2014) 93–98


Thank you so much! There is a lot out there which is why I asked here. I trust my vet and will read your link and show him, also. Many, many years ago, I was a vet tech and dogs usually came in dying of HW or if they were treated, it was a series of shots and sent home to rest. I like to go to the informed and because of my background I can often speak intelligently with the vet and tell him which direction I want to go and what I want to do. But, HW is not my area of expertise, especially with a new dog full of curiosity in a new home, who can't sit still.

I agree with you that the antibiotic is likely for the neuter recovery or perhaps a small skin infliction they found. Didn't think about it being post-op meds as we never gave antibiotics for a neuter. Thanks again!
 
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