German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,408 Posts
That's a refreshing perspective.Thanks for posting!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
Thanks for sharing this! I enjoyed it. Especially:

Here’s the thing: we each train what’s important to us. What I find important with my pets and what you feel are a priority may be very different, and that’s okay.
It's easy to get hung up obsessively comparing. And as the wise Mr. Roosevelt once said, "Comparison is the thief of joy." So true.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,161 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
It's basically how I always have trained and lived with my dogs. I thought that this would not be enough for a WL GSD before I ever got one and the reason I didn't for a long time. But it works beautifully as long as you have fun with them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
980 Posts
It's basically how I always have trained and lived with my dogs. I thought that this would not be enough for a WL GSD before I ever got one and the reason I didn't for a long time. But it works beautifully as long as you have fun with them.
I'm assuming you had show lines and then got a working line? Did you notice any big differences or changes in what you have to do, or your day to day life?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,662 Posts
Fair enough. :)

The only caveat I would suggest, as an abundance of caution is: don't allow your dog to intrude on other people's space.

I'm always bringing up about how we shouldn't assume we have the 'right' to pet every dog that walks by us in public.

The same is true of people who don't want a dog on them or sniffing them.

If you do have guests and don't want to train them to not jump on guests, crate them at least.

If you don't have any leash control out in public areas and the dog wants to run up on every stranger for a sniff, make sure to choke up on the lead a bit to keep them from doing that. If you can't control your dog and don't want to do that training, don't take them out in public.

I love dogs but I personally get so frustrated when I go into a house and I've got three full grown weimaraners with huge long claws leaping up on me and scratching me. I just cannot stand that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
Gwen, agree. Also, there's a lot of benefit to training stuff you may not like to train or may not prioritize in real life. I do IPO tracking with a dog I never intend to trial, because he loves it and it builds his confidence and his bond with me. There aren't many other ways we could do this, and so I take the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,388 Posts
I think it's fine unless what you are doing (or not doing) is inconsiderate and/or endangering others. My Newlie is far from perfect so you would think I would be raving about this article, but I am a little wary of the "do whatever feels good to you" type of philosophy as too often it comes at the expense of others. I am not saying that the author is advocating that, I can just see a lot of people latching on to it as a excuse for not doing what they know they should be doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
980 Posts
I think it's fine unless what you are doing (or not doing) is inconsiderate and/or endangering others. My Newlie is far from perfect so you would think I would be raving about this article, but I am a little wary of the "do whatever feels good to you" type of philosophy as too often it comes at the expense of others. I am not saying that the author is advocating that, I can just see a lot of people latching on to it as a excuse for not doing what they know they should be doing.
I think the "do whatever feels good" philosophy should only apply after a certain base/minimum level of training & socialization has been achieved. Not everyone needs an IPO3 superstar, but everyone does need a calm, obedient dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
152 Posts
People in my area (very dog friendly/no leash laws) generally are happy with taking their dogs out in the local fields or hiking trails off leash, when they have a recall that is nowhere near reliable. In general the dogs will run up to mine (who I usually leash when I see other dogs approaching in case the approaching dog turns out to be aggressive) and at best they try to tackle and play with my leashed dog, and at worst attack him. The owners generally have no problem with this and look at me like I'm ridiculous when I ask them to please leash or not allow their dogs to approach.
Ive not really ever seen someone be apologetic whether their dog is friendly/rude or aggressive. People also are fine with bringing their dogs to the local horse stables and letting them loose to bother people and jump up on and scratch people's cars.
Thats an acceptable level of training to a ton of people here and not fun for the people whose dog's are getting attacked or whose cars are getting scratched up.... not fun to have a pack of 4 large dogs with questionable body language running at you when you are walking two leashed dogs and their owner has no control.

When I'm out hiking I've had so many people comment on how happy they were that I was in control of my dogs and didn't allow them to run up and jump on them like most dogs they run into.

One of my favorite things about where I live is that its so dog friendly... but its things like these- people having their dogs run around untrained and being a nuisance to others that cause dogs to get banned from so many places and strict leash laws put in place.

Theres my little rant lol. I guess to say that I love the article for the most part and I think it makes a great point but I also think that being considerate of others should be a definite priority for so many reasons. Particularly when you are leaving your own house and property. If you want to allow dogs to jump on and bother your own personal guests, that fine I guess, but when it comes to the general public there are certain manners any dog should have.

I really like the article though in general!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,545 Posts
The only caveat I would suggest, as an abundance of caution is: don't allow your dog to intrude on other people's space.
I agree with that. "My rights end where your rights begin" should apply to all dogs in public places. Though my takeaway from this article is not a blanket excuse for being lazy.

Since I started paying close attention at different types of dog events (both participating and spectating), I'm really appreciating the huge spectrum of behaviors that different people want, and encourage, from their dogs. Some want quiet self control, with slow careful predictable movements. Others want intensity, engagement, and pushing for reward and more-more-more. What one person considers obnoxious, another might embrace.

I think this article is encouraging dog enthusiasts to back off some of the sniping/criticisms of personal preferences, not to excuse bad behavior that disrupts other people. It's easier now (with Facebook/Youtube/etc) than ever to constantly, CONSTANTLY, compare your dog and your training to everyone else's dog. And like the author of the article pointed out, with the "well trained dog" that chewed up a pen, it should be fine to talk about screw-ups instead of only showcasing the rare, perfect moments when the stars align and the dog completes its work flawlessly.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,377 Posts
I agree with this article kind of. Just like children everyone has different expectations of their dogs than everyone else . Sometimes even their spouse. However, there should be a certain level of expectation across the board. certain things should be and will be individualized. I personally don't like my dogs jumping on people or myself. I was training Rosko that he doesn't jump on people period. Then I witnessed my wife come home from work one day and the first thing she done was to tell Rosko "hug" at which point rosko jumped up on her in a hug like fashion. I asked her what she was doing and she informed me that she looks forward to that so I switched my training to an immediate response to the off command. He will jump on my wife, daughter, and boys. (they enjoy this) With strangers I tell him off and he doesn't jump on them. As mentioned above the most important aspect of dog ownership needs to be control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,637 Posts
I think it's one thing to allow our dogs to behave a certain way in our own homes, but when it comes to public places, they definitely should be well behaved and under control!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,662 Posts
I agree with you too, that's why I used 'abundance of caution' as a preface.

I also agree about the sniping and I also know better then to put a picture of a chewed up pen on FB. LOL! Social media, I sometimes think it brings more negativity into people's lives then positivity and not just with dogs and training.

But. ;)

I work with a lot of pet people who don't have even the most fundamental manners. Out at the park training two days ago (outside of the fenced area) I witnessed it again no recalls on the dogs, no leash manners.

I've literally had people tell me more then once "Oh my dog will never be able to do that" while out and about with my dogs, which, btw are NOT super spectacular OB dogs. They don't even want to try. We tend to cater to the lowest common denominator eg: because so many dogs are out of control they aren't allowed to go to outdoor spaces, festivals, fairs so on, even on leash. Rather then working to make having a well trained dog a 'perk' we just ban dogs all together.

In the context of how far behind we are with all the 'furbaby' people, in the U.S. The PO mania which disempowers some, enables laziness in others, people who don't want work for a higher bar to begin with, it puts the general idea of the article on shaky ground.

Ideally people would be 'stressing out' a little because their dogs are out of control, but they aren't. I think it's cultural.

Having said that, this is admittedly anecdotal, but I have noticed more people with dogs loose leash walking and being under better control over the years, some signs of improvement. Hopefully it's an overall trend. :)






I agree with that. "My rights end where your rights begin" should apply to all dogs in public places. Though my takeaway from this article is not a blanket excuse for being lazy.

Since I started paying close attention at different types of dog events (both participating and spectating), I'm really appreciating the huge spectrum of behaviors that different people want, and encourage, from their dogs. Some want quiet self control, with slow careful predictable movements. Others want intensity, engagement, and pushing for reward and more-more-more. What one person considers obnoxious, another might embrace.

I think this article is encouraging dog enthusiasts to back off some of the sniping/criticisms of personal preferences, not to excuse bad behavior that disrupts other people. It's easier now (with Facebook/Youtube/etc) than ever to constantly, CONSTANTLY, compare your dog and your training to everyone else's dog. And like the author of the article pointed out, with the "well trained dog" that chewed up a pen, it should be fine to talk about screw-ups instead of only showcasing the rare, perfect moments when the stars align and the dog completes its work flawlessly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,161 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I think it's one thing to allow our dogs to behave a certain way in our own homes, but when it comes to public places, they definitely should be well behaved and under control!
What I sensed from this article is that it is OK if they are not perfect. Mine are not, but they are great in impulse control and obedience, at home and in public. I just don't need them to be robotic.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,728 Posts
What I sensed from this article is that it is OK if they are not perfect. Mine are not, but they are great in impulse control and obedience, at home and in public. I just don't need them to be robotic.
Reminds me of the time I had Carly at the training center, and we walked into the building and saw these 2 goldens. The woman had just finished training and was packing up her stuff. She handed a tote bag to one golden, and a stainless water bowl to the other golden. No one was on a leash, and they stood there like perfect little statues. I was in awe, I'll admit. She saw me, and said "oh they love to carry things!". She turned and they followed her across the building and out the back door. I looked at Carly and said to her "oh honey, you'll never be a robot dog". I'm not sure if that was a compliment or a complaint, LOL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,408 Posts
I agree with this article kind of. Just like children everyone has different expectations of their dogs than everyone else . Sometimes even their spouse. However, there should be a certain level of expectation across the board. certain things should be and will be individualized. I personally don't like my dogs jumping on people or myself. I was training Rosko that he doesn't jump on people period. Then I witnessed my wife come home from work one day and the first thing she done was to tell Rosko "hug" at which point rosko jumped up on her in a hug like fashion. I asked her what she was doing and she informed me that she looks forward to that so I switched my training to an immediate response to the off command. He will jump on my wife, daughter, and boys. (they enjoy this) With strangers I tell him off and he doesn't jump on them. As mentioned above the most important aspect of dog ownership needs to be control.
I agree with you on a certain level of expectation across the board and think that applies to kids and animals alike. Common courtesy when you are out in the world, let's call it. I don't accept teeth on skin, I don't accept jumping, I want a solid "leave it," and I expect a calm sit when I ask for it so people can meet and greet. (All assuming dogs on leash - actual, not flexi.) Basically, enough owner control that the dog doesn't pose a risk to others.

But as for the rest, I completely agree with the premise that we all have different pictures of what "fitting into our lives" looks like and we all prioritize accordingly. For example, I have a German Shepherd with a big booming bark, and I live in the middle of the city where the lots are practically on top of each other. We are continuing to work hard on "NO BARK" - while I want her to bark when she feels an alert is warranted, I also want her to immediately stop when I tell her to, so she isn't a nuisance to my neighbors. This is a process; I'm noticing that progress has started to go in stops and starts since she hit 18 months or so, but it remains a high priority to train through.

What we haven't ever bothered with is the "place" command, which some people swear by, because we are pretty relaxed about her being allowed on the furniture with us and we almost never entertain. I'm starting work on it now for something to do, because I'm sure it will come in handy, but it's more of a luxury than a need, training-wise.

I do judge other owners, against the advice of the blogger, but that's more for things that go against that basic courtesy and basic owner control, or for bringing an aggressive dog out into the world and then not managing it. I judge those things harshly, mostly because I don't want 1) my own dog harmed, or 2) life as a dog owner made more difficult because stupid people had to go and ruin it for the rest of us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,408 Posts
It's easier now (with Facebook/Youtube/etc) than ever to constantly, CONSTANTLY, compare your dog and your training to everyone else's dog. And like the author of the article pointed out, with the "well trained dog" that chewed up a pen, it should be fine to talk about screw-ups instead of only showcasing the rare, perfect moments when the stars align and the dog completes its work flawlessly.
This is very very true.

I spent quite awhile stressing out that my puppy wasn't as perfect as some of the other dogs we trained with, until it hit me that my expectations of her were a tad unrealistic given that the dogs I was comparing her to were one and two years older. Comparisons are far less helpful than identifying what I like about what the dogs can do, as well as specific things their handlers do that I think are smart and effective. And when they share things their dogs do that make them, well, dogs, that does help!
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top