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If it is in the best interest of all involved, I feel there is nothing wrong with rehoming a dog.

I rehomed a dog many years ago and felt that it was the best decision for the dog. My ex and I had seen an ad for a GSD in the newspaper and went to meet the dog. What we saw when we got to the house was not at all what we expected. This had been the son's dog and he no longer had time for her. The owners had the means to care for the dog, but they didn't care enough. She was skinny with a horrible coat and had been banished to the garage, with only a small piece of carpet to lay on, in the middle of winter. We couldn't leave her there, so we took her home, got her vetted and fixed up. We both worked full time and she started having bad separation anxiety. It was long before I ever heard of a crate. Ex hubby had a coworker whose wife was a stay at home mom with 3 young children. They met her and it was love at first site all the way around. She loved the kids and had someone home with her all day. I have never for a second regretted the decision to adopt her and to rehome her.

I fully understand the situations Carolina mentioned in her original post. Unless you have lived with dogs who cannot live together, you don't realize how stressful it is. Sheba was the foster who couldn't leave because she has fear aggression issues. Cody did not want to share her house with another female and attacked her repeatedly. My options were euthanize Sheba or keep her and keep her separated from Cody. For 5 years, until Cody died from cancer at age 12, they were kept separated. I would never wish that on anyone or their dog.

During 5 years in rescue, with 2 exceptions, every dog we placed in a new home through our owner referral program thrived in their new homes.
 

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Rehoming is probably the hardest thing I have ever had to deal with in my life. It wasn't with dogs but with a pair of cat sisters that were dear to me. I had to rehome them after 2 years of living with them because they would attack my older cat, serenity. This wasn't play time eaither, this was all out fight to the death with them. After a hard choice and a load of crying, I decided the best thing to do was to rehome them in a house where they were the only animals in the house. My mother's friend took them and after a few months of crying I got some what over it. Then suddenly we get a call that we have to pick them up or animal control was going to pick them up and destroy them. I was so devistated and in shock that we rushed over there and took them back. These cats were indoor cats only but when we took them back, they were covered in fleas and were living outside!!
Apparently they got into the neighbors car and destroyed the inside of the car. When I got them back, it was the hardest thing next to rehoming them. One of the sisters that was originally my cat, hated me. She would hiss at me and attack me whenever she got the chance. I don't think I ever stopped crying until they were adopted for the second time. I ahve no clue who has them or even if they are taken well care of. Our vets office took them in after we got them back because those cats could not be with Serenity.
So I now how hard it is to rehome. Of course with my dogs, I don't think I could EVER rehome them. I've had cody for almost 6 years, I got him when it was near the end of 7th grade, I'm 19 now. He has saved my life twice and defended off a man who was stalking me. Just the thought of rehoming my dogs is horrible, I just don't think I could do it.
 

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Originally Posted By: IliamnasQuestI left Tori there with her. I felt awful at first but went back and visited frequently and could see that Tori had already adopted Sallie as her very own person (she'd always had to share me with the other dogs). And Sallie, within a week, was so attached to Tori that it would have broken her heart to take her away.

I still visit Sallie and Tori, and Tori is always glad to see me. But she will greet me and then run over and lean against Sallie. Sallie calls Tori her soulmate and is closer to that dog than she's ever been to any dog, I think.
Now THAT is a love story if I've ever heard one
 

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I did not read the entire thread.

I had a dog tell ME she wanted to be rehomed. She was SOOOO happy to have a home with me. She had been a kennel dog most of her life previous to her finally being able to move in with me. She and Tika did not really get along. Tika is a bouncy girl and is often misread by other dogs (especially female Shepherds for some reason). Anyway when I was TRYING to rehome Grissom (pup that was returned) I had him and Kayla at the feed store because a guy was interested in Gris. Kayla seriously was "along for the ride" but Kayla LOVED this guy and he prefered an older female even though I had repeatedly told him Kayla was not leaving. Kayla totally fell in love with this guy even though she was typically aloof with strangers. She followed him through the store, kept nagging him for attention even when I was trying to let him spend time with Gris. This was totally out of character for her. We met him a couple of other times and Kayla ALWAYS had the same response to him. Kayla LOVED me and I have no doubt about that. She had a GOOD life with me but letting her go with him was THE BEST life for her. She had been through a lont in her life and she deserved to be treated like royalty. She finally got to be the ONE dog that someones life revolved around. Coming with me was a vast improvement for her. Me giving up a girl I truely loved was bitter sweet but it was RIGHT in this case. Kayla wanted it. She walked into his home and immediately laid in the sun and fell asleep. She knew she was "home". She went to work with him at his hardware store. She was in an accident and suffered a shattered hip. He paid thousands of dollars to have surgery to repair it and give her an excellent quality of life. He took her for rides JUST to take her for rides. He took her on the boat. She loved boats.

It was very hard for me but I KNOW she was even more happy than being with me.
 

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Reading through all the responses, it doesn't surprise me that this is an emotional issue. And I think it SHOULD be, in some ways. If we were not emotional about our dogs, they would simply be property like a computer or a car and it would be commonplace for us to "upgrade" as necessary.

Leesa, I was not trying to imply any fault to you - was just trying to clarify and show that the topic is not always as black and white as it seemed you were thinking it was.

What I think (my opinion only, folks! *L*) is that rehoming is sometimes the best option, but should always be taken seriously and not used as a "clearinghouse" so that you can get rid of dogs who have given you their all but that you just have no need for anymore. And rehoming, in the spirit in which this thread was started, would not include the typical dumping of dogs that rescue people tend to see.

On the off-topic of euthanasia for temperament problems, I have also had to do that once. It was awful. My dog - a nationally ranked UD Australian shepherd - had epilepsy which turned into sudden rage syndrome. And if you've never dealt with sudden rage syndrome .. well, the dog basically is acting completely normal one second and the next they're attacking, with no precursors. Lady would get set off by simple things. One time I reached down to pick up a food dish to get the dogs their evening meal and she attacked me (causing injury). She took to attacking my GSD, the only dog she ever really got along with in the first place.

When she wasn't attacking, she was a very loving, social dog - but I couldn't trust her. So I separated her, kept her kenneled when people were around, and watched the joy go from her life. And, unfortunately, my (now ex) husband had young grandchildren and they were often over to the house, and when I looked out one day to see a toddler reaching into Lady's kennel while the grown-ups were busy talking and not paying attention, I knew my options were to move Lady out behind the barn where she would have ZERO human contact other than being fed, or have her euthanized.

I chose euthanasia. She would have been absolutely miserable living behind the barn. I did what I thought was right for her, even though it tore me up.

So, again, this is not a black and white issue. She'd been on seizure medications for years. We'd tried new ones and new combinations. I'd done behavior modification work with her. I'd managed the problem with separation and accepted getting bit numerous times. There was NO CHANCE of her getting better.

Anyhow .. I hope I NEVER have to rehome again or euthanize another dog for temperament reasons. I love the dogs I have now, and the reason I'm living in a shop with NO shower and NO kitchen is because I wanted to keep my dogs. I lived in a tent one summer for the same reason. But I don't regret Tori's move to the country, where she has freedom and goes out to help protect her owner from moose and bears while her owner feeds horses twice a day. It's a life she needed and I couldn't give to her.

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
 

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I think that in the situations described (old dog doesn't get along with new dog) finding the new dog a good home isn't what I typically think of as rehoming. To me it would be a trial situation that didn't work out. My loyalty is to the dogs I've had the longest. For instance: Years ago I found a puppy at the park, turned him in to the humane society. Checked later he was unclaimed and HS was going to euthanize claiming he had kennel cough. I got him back. My old dog wouldn't tolerate him so I found him a home. It had been my intention all along to keep him IF it worked with the older dog and to find him a home if it didn't.

I felt guilty not giving up a dog once. I had had her for many years and a friend's elderly father had always loved her. I had moved about 1000 miles away and visited only once a year or so. He didn't ask, I didn't offer but I felt that he could have benefitted greatly from having her. I don't think I could have done it.

I wonder if I will be able to give up my dogs when I get so old that people start telling me I should. I'd like to think I could hire someone to come take them out on runs, play frisbe and so on.
 

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this is a hard one..........

personally, i have never given up a dog. i have had some that were challenges, but at least they always got along within the pack.
if i got a dog that was seriously threat to one of my other dogs, or my cat, rather than kennel it most of the time or make different living arrangements for it within my household or property here, i would rehome. what kind of life would it have not being to interact with the whole family and live normally. maybe some could make it work that way, but if a dog couldn't safely be an active part of my homelife i couldn't keep it. it would just add stress and tension constantly.

i would not jepordize the older members of the pack here and upset their lifestyle.

to give up a dog because it were timid, fearful, or any of those issues is ones own decision. alot of us know what a hard road that is to work through those issues, but it can be managed in alot of cases if you are willing to dedicate yourself enough. its a lifetime of being on top of it, and it can lead to unpredictable behavior, but if the dog fits in the house and the connection/bond is there most of us would work with it.

debbie
 

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Cabela, my min pin, was a puppymill survior, I worked 2 long years with him to get him to a good point in his life, when we go on vacation I won't even board him he goes to my sister's house. He has worked through so many issues I think if I ever rehomed him it would be an extenstive process but I would never. If anything ever happened he would go back to rescue that is my contract.
 

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Originally Posted By: debbiebi also think a shy/timid/fearful dog would be the hardest to give up, because of their insecurities they tend to have a stronger bond to the owner.

debbie
You know, it seems like this would be the case but it isn't always. The dog that I rehomed was extremely timid when I got her, and I worked diligently to get her through that. And I'm glad that I had her because we taught each other a lot.

But when she met Sallie, there was an instant spark - as if they needed each other and recognized it. I don't think they would have had such a spark had I not given my dog the tools to understand that people are basically good - and Sallie wouldn't have known how to teach Tori this, so she wouldn't have been the right owner for her when Tori was fearful. But at the time they met it was just the right time for both of them. And it was pretty quickly obvious that Tori would have a life that suited her better if she lived with Sallie.

Heck, I'd enjoy living out on this homestead! *L* Wonder if Sallie would adopt me too?

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
 

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Originally Posted By: G-burg
Quote: That is the ONLY reason why I rehomed my dogs.
What made you re-home the prior 3 dogs that were there the longest? Why did you not re-home or return Gala? Since she is the one causing all the problems? Or Sam?
Seriously, I don't know Carolina OR Leesa, but I will tend to agree with Leesa's posts... especially this one.

And to answer the original question, yes, I have re-homed a dog in the past. However, it was when we were in a MUCH different situation as far as our living arrangements, lifestyle, etc.

We only had one dog, our GSD Luke, who passed away a year and a half ago. We brought home a rescued Siberian Husky and the Husky immediately picked a fight with Luke and it was ON from there. They constantly had to be seperated. We lived in a small apartment and it wasn't easy. We kept him and tried to make it work for 8 months before we decided that rehoming him would be the best option. As much as I loved him and still miss him to this day, we certainly weren't going to be rehoming Luke!

I listed him with a Sibe rescue and he found a GREAT home where he is the only dog and very spoiled.

I am in a much different situation now. I own a home with a fenced in yard. I have 10 adult dogs here, of all shapes and sizes. Not everybody gets along with everybody, but I make it work. 3 of the dogs are fosters waiting for new homes, and 1 is a police K9 in training, but even within the group of my own dogs, I wouldn't have all 6 of them out at the same time. My dogs spend a lot of time in their crates/kennels, way more than the average pet owner. But, they all get plenty of supervised time out of them, and they all have something mentally and physically stimulating to do each day. Most of them are in training for some form of work, but I have one rescued house dog who is totally neurotic and all she does is chase the cats, try to pick fights with everyone else, steal food, bark all the time, etc. She's really a royal PITA, but we love her dearly and she was here before any of the rest of them and I can't imagine her living anywhere but with us.

Just my .02.
 

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This subject terrifies me! I pray that I never have to consider it. I do everything I can to ensure that the pack is in line.

When it came to forming the group there were a few things I had to do. One was that each dog would submit to Kramer. Not a negotiable item! Plus he had to like them-beyond just tolerating. Not love them, because he wouldn't act like that anyway, but accept them. First in, last out.

Then each dog had to be able to be okay with dogs of different sizes because they range in size from 35-66#. And they had to be trainable to cats. And THEN, they had to get along with, and be okay with each other member of the pack. If there was a dog I loved, but did not meet all of those criteria, it was adopted out.

The other criteria seemed to be issues beyond the norm/unadoptibility and whether it's my idea that they bond by their misfittiness, or they really do, the normal dogs I fostered seem to sense there was a different kind of vibe with my dogs.

Now that I have this group using that criteria, I always worry about cost/my job and their continued ability to interact with each other appropriately. Just yesterday I saw that Ava was being excluded a little by two of the other girls, so we all had a discussion session and practiced some new better behaviors together-before they turned into active negative behaviors. I tell them you may be crazy, but I am crazier, so we will all get along.

It's a lot of work, their safety is something I am always aware of, as they are animals regardless of how well they respond to the people psych I use on them (of course we are all mammals-so...) but I remain hopeful that the steps I took creating the group, and maintaining the group will continue to work (knock wood-and not sure what kind of crapstorm there will be without Kramer as my Don Corleone).

I do agree with KHudak-there are definitely nicer places, better homes for them all if we look. I don't think they care so much about that, but they do adapt to new circumstances, though I don't want mine to have to adapt ever again.
 

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I've been pretty fortunate mine seem to all get along. with an important exception. Dh's mother's cat Molly...... We are dealing with anxiety issues with her, to the point she has to be isolated from the others when we are not home and pulls her own hair out, will chew herself until she bleeds. (sigh) No medical reason, been to the vet, referred to specialists. She's on anxiety medicine most of the time - dh calls it kitty acid
She should be rehomed, but, dh won't allow it. My mother would be the ideal candidate, I rehomed Ari with her a few years ago and he had a wonderful life. But mom fears if anything ever happened with Molly dh would blame her because she was his mother's cat. (The mother used to call and leave Molly voicemail messages, write her notes, the lady was cuckoo) So we rotate time out of the cat room (which was supposed to be a giant closet/dressing room for me) and watch her like a hawk. She was never socialized with animals, so coming into the zoo, the zoo expanding.... She seems to like the kittens now, (one just 6mos old and one just over a year) but they and their arrival were what triggered this anxiety episode. She has crappy nerves and should be in a one animal home. We are working through it, but.... every anxiety episode takes a toll on us and her. We're working through it. I wish I could say no more animals until she is gone, but she's only 7 and the end of her life could be a long way off. For now we work through it, and we delay the last cat I purchased's joining of the home, we may rehome him before he hits the door. He's a Bengal we've given one more season to show before he comes to my home as a pet, but after what we've just gone through with Molly, we may be putting him into a pet home elsewhere.

I think everything we do and the decisions concerning our animals has to be done with their best interests in mind and as hard as it is, we need to try and seperate our hearts from what our heads need to do for the benefit of that animal. Also I think it is a personal decision that nobody else can judge.
 

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I have never had to do this. I think I would have to be EXTREMELY desperate......... I would vet the home very carefully, or ask for the help of a rescue person I trusted.

________________________________________________________

Susan

Anja GSD
Conor GSD - adopted from this Board
Blue GSd - at the Bridge
 

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let those without sin cast the first stone. It's nobody's business but the OP.

I believe the question originally was:

If you had a GSD who had an OK life with you and you loved the dog very much, but all of a sudden an awesome home would come up where you knew your dog would be even better than with you... Spoiled to death, be able to go to work with the new owner every day, etc. Would you rehome him/her even though you know you would have a hard time letting go?
 

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It is ok Angela, I do agree with some of them that I'm a HORRIBLE dog owner for wanting the best for my dogs... the lives they deserved with loving families and which I couldn't provide for them for one thing or another.
I sure pray they NEVER have to come to the situation I was in.
 
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