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It definetly seems there is something else going on this thread than just a discussion over "would you rehome or not"..
regardless of that... I would rehome my dogs and cats if I could not care for them. I cannot tell you what those circumstances would be, I know I would fight as long as I could to keep them all. I love all my animals dearly and god only knows how many times I have gotten frustrated with one or the other, but I still would never want to rehome them.
But if it was a matter of their well-being I would DEFINETLY find them a new home. Let's keep our fingers crossed that none of us have to go through this ever (some of you.. ever again!!)
 

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Sometimes I think we "humanize" dogs too much.....most dogs I have had come into my home either from rescue or from another home (unless they had fear issues) adjusted wonderfully. They fit right in and in a day or so if one were to come to my house you would assume the dog had been there for life. So assuming that ones home is always the "best" home for the dog is often a bad assumption. I think most dogs if treated kindly would be happy just about anywhere. That is most dogs without major issues......
JMHO...
 

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Although I do agree with Chris on this, I still do think that shepherds more than some other breeds create a strong bond with their owners and do not adjust AS easily as some other breeds.
I had a foster dog that was an absolute mess for a while, but when he did adjust to my home, he was fine! JMO!
I wanted to add that my foster dog did have some issues, so possible that was the reason why he did not adjust as fast. He had been with his previous owner for several years..
 

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Yes, I think I would rehome a personal dog (or any pet for that matter) if my home wasn't the right place for the dog.
I think most of us here are past the place where we would rehome because of barking, simple destruction of property, shedding or any of the idiot reasons those of us involved in rescue (or read craigslist) hear so often.
That being said, there are situations that come up that don't involve a frivolous, selfish reason to place a pet in another home. Things happen, and every situation is different.
Sheilah
 

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Re: Re homing - Would you do it?

I don't think there is a universal right or wrong answer.

Have I re-homed dogs to a better situation for them than what I was able to give them at that time YES. Did I do it just to dump them, NO. I did it because it was a better fit for the dog than my at that time situation. Both placements were very successful and the dogs were very happy.

Would I re-home another dog, maybe yes maybe no. Currently I rearrange dogs because Cheyenne and DeeDee will never get along. Have I considered re-homing, yes but just a fleeting thought. I couldn't re home DeeDee as she has nerve problems and not everyone can deal with that. She does well with us. So that would leave finding a home for Cheyenne. I might or might not be able to find the right place for her, so we make the best of what we can do.

I think it is a very personal decision, it varies with circumstances, personalities of dogs and life situations.

I have seen several situations on this board where people have puppies that just are NOT a good match for them. YES I suggest returning to the breeder or re-homing, there is no reason that this pup and family have to be miserable the rest of the dog's life if a better fit can be found.

I see posters here that have a lot of emotion just like during the pre-election period. Some times posts can be misinterpreted by the person reading it, as when we read we put our own emotions into what we are reading, which can take what the poster in intended in the wrong direction. Maybe what the poster was expressing were their deep beliefs and others being maybe on the opposite side read it as a slap in the face or an attack.

Val
 

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Re: Re homing - Would you do it?

I feel compelled to add something to my earlier post as I read where this thread has gone:

I've spoken of my boy Po (Apollo of .....) who went to the Ridge just before the holidays. One day many years ago, I was looking at a dog magazine and saw the most magnificent dog I'd ever laid eyes on in. On a whim, I called the number. I spoke with the man, a breeder, who went to tell me about the "cover" dog and his siblings. I held my tongue about being involved in rescue - I just had to know more about this dog.

It turns out the dog in the picture was an international champion as was his dam, sires, etc., etc. It also turned out that said champion had a sibling, now 2 years old, that had just been returned to the breeder after failing to be aggressive enough for police work, then rehomed more than once and though trained and shown a little, not "champion stock" because on puppy x-rays there was a "spot" on his hip. To say that there was more to the story is an understatement but, a few days later, I drove to BWI and picked up a crated mat of black hair who went straight to the vet and ICU with urinary obstruction and kidney failure secondary to being unneutered with a prostate the size of a basketball.

The breeder in this situation had a lot of ways he could have gone. He could have refused to take Po back after the initial owners failed him. The dog returned to the breeder, intact, at 2 years could have been bred, resold, or much, much worse. Instead, the breeder allowed him to come to me. And, yes, there was great cost incurred by me in getting him here and making him well.

I don't know about everyone else, but I don't live in a perfect world. Po was in this world, in fairly dire straights, without a lot of future prospects working in his best interest. At that point, where he came from was the very least of his problems. His breeder made a decision that changed both our futures for the better for many years. I'm grateful to have had the privilege and opportunity to have such a magnificent and deserving dog.
 

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Quote:I agree Betty....I don't see anything wrong with that question either? I read it and thought it was a legit one and not "borderline bashing" especially considering how Leesa phrased it.....
I agree. I think it would be different if someone started a thread saying "here's why it's wrong that so and so is rehoming dogs" but Carolina started the thread asking people for their opinions on rehoming and citing her specific situation, which is what people are responding to. For me, I would not rehome a dog that only needed a new home because I had obtained another dog that had a conflict with the original dog. I would try very hard not to bring in an incompatible dog in the first place, but if I did - as I did in my foster situation described above - I would rehome the dog I brought in, not the original one.

I'm not trying to bash anyone. I'm just saying I see this a lot in rescue - people make voluntary changes to their own living situation and then rehome a dog who was previously fine but now no longer fits. I don't see that as prioritizing the needs of the orginal dog, at least not overall.
 

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Quote: Do we really want to get into this? As it is borderline bashing, the same question could be turned around so I don't really think we want to get into this publicly.
Not sure where the bashing came in! but what ever!

I asked an honest question Angela and if you want to make it more then what this thread is then fine!
 

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Originally Posted By: GSDBESTK9If you had a GSD who had an OK life with you and you loved the dog very much, but all of a sudden an awesome home would come up where you knew your dog would be even better than with you... Spoiled to death, be able to go to work with the new owner every day, etc. Would you rehome him/her even though you know you would have a hard time letting go?

I never thought I could, but unfortunately I've had to do it more than once now. First with my White GSD who was being harrased by my other dogs constantly, it was so bad she was petrified of coming near my other dogs and started pooping in the basement and licking her legs pink. I cried for months after rehoming her, but she is in a great home now and spoiled to death, doesn't have to worry about other dogs bulling her.

Then about 5 months ago I had to do it again with my Yorkie Tallan. Gala thought Tallan was a chew toy and had no respect for her. In fact, I could not give Tallan any attention cause Gala would get so jealous she would attack her afterwards. I could not keep risking Tallan's life and she was not happy and constantly afraid where she didn't even want to come out of my bedroom anymore (where Gala was not allowed).

Last week I saw Tallan again, I gave her to a family friend and she is so freaking spoiled it isn't funny and they love her to death! She has a HUGE fenced in yard to run in, a new sister that is her size and whom Tallan bosses around.
I saw her so happy that I knew I had done the right thing for her.
I absolutely would, sometimes the greatest love is letting go. I may be in the situation myself.
 

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I will not re-home my dogs, ever. But I am retired, have a good trainer, and am able to work with the problem ones (I do rescue).

If you have a job, and a dog that does not integrate, and can find a good home, I tend to think that is fine.

If you are retired or a at home person Iwould suggest a good trainer to work with the dog before re-homing.
 

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I think that much is being read into responses here that should not be....the written medium is not always conducive to clarity!

Rehoming is a personal choice, and I have taken on animals and kept them all their lives and I have rehomed animals when I felt they would be living a better life than I could give them. Putting aside pups that are bred to be sold....everyone has their own values and emotions and must live with their own conscience. Rehoming a dog that you cannot do justice to, one that is not as happy as it it could be in another situation is not a crime, nor is it a negative when someone chooses to rehome a dog. What the bottom line is that the dog has the best quality of life possible and is happy. I abhore the "throwaway" mentality, and I know that I could rehome some and not others. I have placed one that really made me feel guilty, but that dog is in a situation which suits her personality and needs much much much better than I could have done.

Lets keep this an intellectual, objective discussion, and not bring baggage into it....we all live with our choices. I know that Leesa loves Hawke, and this was a temporary thing from day one...and he will be going to a super super super working home where he will be just as loved and spoiled!

Lee
 

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the OP wasn't talking about breeders. my reply didn't have breeders in mind. i think the OP did the right thing. if you read the post more carefully you'll find everybody is not against rehoming.
Originally Posted By: Angela_WSo a breeder who has females getting older, they should all retire with the owner and never be rehomed? I have rehomed dogs that didn't work out in my breeding program. I have 2 seniors in the house (one spayed pet, other retired female). So if I go off of everyone's scenario here, I'd never be a breeder again because I would end up with 15 dogs with just one litter. After all, when you are a breeder the pups are technically being "rehomed" whether for a purchase fee or a so called "adoption" fee. If you have 3 females for breeding, eventually they would retire, then what would you have to replace them in your program?

I have rehomed animals that absolutely wouldn't get along, I have others I have rescued and are still here. Vishnu was rescued, the 2 cats I have are rescued. The cats have to be kept separated so they don't fight. As my situation will most likely be changing in a couple of years, I will be downsizing after Duchess and Oxana pass on. Guess that makes me a horrible person.

How many of you have euthanized instead of rehoming a dog? I would hope no one unless it was a severe medical issue and no hope. I would think rehoming would be better than being put down especially if the dog is better off some where else. It's no different than when you do have to put down a dog for health reasons as to what is BEST FOR THE DOG. If that is being put down for health reasons, or being rehomed due to a hostile environment, it's still what is important to the dog.
 

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I am living with the "rehoming" issue right now.

Our rhodie mix Kibby was dumped outside our house about 2+ years ago. I kept her under the condition that she was a foster and we would find a home for her. Over the past couple of years she has shown many issues that make it extremely hard to place her. Her prey drive is over the top, she becomes very easily over excited if anyone runs around her and will grab their legs for a "take down". She has killed chickens and cats. She once broke into the chicken coop and took out every chicken we owned. She has terrible issues with my two other female shepherds. We have to keep them seperated at all times. The last incident was when Neko broke out of her crate during dog "changeover" time. Neko walked up to her, they licked faces, Neko turned away and Kibby went in for her throat and she meant business. I practice NILF with all my dogs including Kibby. I have a happy controlled pack of 6 and 1 who can become a demon in a heartbeat with other animals. Yes I have worked with other trainers, yes I have taken her to be evaluated by a behavioral specialist who told me that her prey drive is so high she will never be able to be trusted with other animals or small children. She gives no warning when she attacks the other animal, no growl, her hackles do not raise, she simply goes from gentle dog to killer in a heartbeat.

Both of the trainers and the behavioral specialist have told me that this is not an issue that can be "trained" out of her. This is a "red zone" issue that can only be controlled by knowing the triggers and preventing the situation from happening.

So here are my choices,
Keep going as we are, this means she spends much time in the crate. Yes she gets her 1:1 time and as much love as we can give her but it is not a quality life. She can never lay around the house with the rest of the pack, never walk with the rest of the pack, never have a really fun play session with the kids or the pack.

Euthanize

Keep looking for a home where they can be aware of the issues and have experience with a high prey drive dog and understand that this will never be the dog they can take to the dog park or let run loose. No other pets, or small children. I have a female couple who have just such a situation and are considering adopting her. They know all her positives (she is crate trained, house trained, obedient, knows her commands, spayed, up to date on all shots and is a loving and gentle dog with adult humans who know not to push her excitement buttons) and her negatives.

If they decide they want her I will let her go in a heartbeat. I will cry and miss her but it will give her a chance at as normal a life as she will ever possibly have.
 

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LET'S GET THIS THREAD BACK ON TRACK.


Ahem....that said....

I have rehomed a dog once.

We bought a male GSD pup when we were first married and my oldest son was 2 and my daughter 4 months. We were young and couldn't wait to have that perfect family....you know, the one with the kids and the dog....in other words, we were naive and stupid.

We were both working full time jobs at the time, me during the day and my husband at night. It took all we had to be good parents to a toddler and newborn....let alone provide the sufficient time and training a GSD pup requires and deserves.

Shortly after buying him, I realized this. It broke my heart and I felt like a total failure but I gave him to my friend's boyfriend. He had his own house and was looking for a male GSD. I would never have let him go to just anyone, but they were a perfect match and, despite the pain I felt in making the decision, I knew it was best for him.

I didn't want to rehome our pup and I felt like a complete failure doing so, but the real failure would have been if my selfishness and pride had prevented me from doing what was best for him.

Of course, we all realize that far too many people rehome, get rid of and even euthanize dogs for purely selfish reasons or because they are unwilling to dedicate the time or commitment it requires to owning a dog. However, we can't let this sad fact cloud our common sense and reason. There are very few reasons I would rehome a dog, but if it's truly in the best interest of the dog, then the wrong thing to do would be to keep him.
 

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I think it takes an inordinate amount of courage to put down a dog who is severely temperamentally unsound or damaged. Most of us would feel that we failed the dog, no matter if it was true or not, and would be sorrowful at having to do this. My sincere sympathy and admiration if you have had to make that choice, it takes a great deal of strength to take that step.

I know two people who had to do this recently. The first had an unhealthy, dysplastic and unstable nervy dog that she bought as a pup - he was 15 months or so old, fearful, in pain, and could not sustain nourishment (not EPI, maybe mega?) . He nipped two children (family members) from fear. The other dog was so nervy, he hid in the bathtub, and would have explosive diarreha if the owner tried to put him in her car.

Everyone has different priorities, pets are beloved family members, and breeders often have different priorities. No one disputes that nor does anyone seem to be judgemental here.

Lee
 

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Quote:Actually had nothing to do with Hawke but 2 other dogs.

Honest question? I doubt it.
Angela, why are you trying to make this into something more? Not sure what your beef is with me..
 

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I have rehomed a dog - well returned him to the shelter.

It was 1983; I was 22 years old and living with two roommates in a large house (rental) with fenced back yard. Both were dog lovers and I had always wanted a dog. So we talked and they were supportive of me adding a dog to our household.

Off I went to the local shelter and came home with a darling Golden pup.

A short time later I found out I was going to have to have another kidney surgery, and the surgery would take place in a town 110 miles from where I was living. After my surgery I would be staying with my folks until I was cleared to go back to work. This was going to be weeks and weeks without me at home, weeks and weeks of hospital stay and recovery.

Reluctantly I took the pup back to the shelter with specific instructions that if they could not find a home to call me and I’d take him back and figure something out. I also asked them to give my name and number to who ever adopted him with word that they could contact me if they wanted any information.

Within a couple days I received a call from a woman saying they had adopted the puppy and told me about their family.
2 kids and a farm.

I got visitation rights – that was one happy happy puppy!!

I then waited another 20 years before I got Dante – it was one of the most difficult things I’ve done, but I had no doubt when I saw that pup in his new home that I had done the right thing. And of course when it turned out that I was in the hospital for 6 weeks not to mention all the recovery time…well it wouldn’t have been a fun time for the pup.

Would I rehome again? I’d like to say never but I can’t see the future.
 

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I couldn't do it. Ive bonded too deeply with my dogs that not having them in my life would be like taking away a huge chunk of my heart. ****, even if I were homeless Id try to figure out someway to keep them. If any of my dogs started to not get a long with each other.. I still would make it work.. gates, crates, rotate, etc. I just love my dogs too much. If I had too many dogs that I couldnt possibly have enough time to provide for them.. that might be a different case, but then again, I would never put myself in the position to have more dogs than I have time for.

We cant give up our dogs just because there is a better home out there for them...lets be honest... most of us CANT say that there ISNT a better home our there for our dogs than the ones we are providing for them.

Lets say someone comes a long that has acre upon acre for the dogs to run and play, someone who has a pond or pool for swimming, sheep on site for herding, someone who doesnt work and can spend all day every day with their dogs... yes that is a better home than I can provide, but I wont give up my dogs to someone just for that fact... not everyone is that lucky but they can still have dogs!

I mean, I do the best I can for my dogs and I think they are all happy living with me. Yes they could have a better life some where else in terms of yard size and commodities as mentioned above, but that doesnt mean they have to.

Now thats just my opinion!
 

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I agree in the homeless situation, I actually in some way face that situation with Diabla and I had to move where she couldn't go and even when it is difficult, tiring, expensive, we had made it through.. Maybe there could be a lot of better situations for Diabla than to sleep in an outdoor kennel and spend all day moving with me in the car. It was not a situation I put my dog into, is a situation life put both of us and it can happen to anyone in any moment. Probably there are hundreds of better families for her than me, but we shouldn't sub-estimate our dog capacity of adaptation.

But there are also times when too much is too much. My border collie started to chew her foot until it was a mess, she not only licked it, she used to put all the foot on her mouth until it bleed badly. If for some reason your life changed in a way that put you and one of your dog under the same kind of behavioral distress, would you keep your opinion?
 
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