German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 244 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,131 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
If you had a GSD who had an OK life with you and you loved the dog very much, but all of a sudden an awesome home would come up where you knew your dog would be even better than with you... Spoiled to death, be able to go to work with the new owner every day, etc. Would you rehome him/her even though you know you would have a hard time letting go?

I never thought I could, but unfortunately I've had to do it more than once now. First with my White GSD who was being harrased by my other dogs constantly, it was so bad she was petrified of coming near my other dogs and started pooping in the basement and licking her legs pink. I cried for months after rehoming her, but she is in a great home now and spoiled to death, doesn't have to worry about other dogs bulling her.

Then about 5 months ago I had to do it again with my Yorkie Tallan. Gala thought Tallan was a chew toy and had no respect for her. In fact, I could not give Tallan any attention cause Gala would get so jealous she would attack her afterwards. I could not keep risking Tallan's life and she was not happy and constantly afraid where she didn't even want to come out of my bedroom anymore (where Gala was not allowed).

Last week I saw Tallan again, I gave her to a family friend and she is so freaking spoiled it isn't funny and they love her to death! She has a HUGE fenced in yard to run in, a new sister that is her size and whom Tallan bosses around.
I saw her so happy that I knew I had done the right thing for her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
932 Posts
I have done it twice myself both times wasn't easy either but it was that or alot of fighting, I still think about them everyday, (one died after being spayed) and the other one I can visit anytime I want too and he is so spoiled, I know I made the right choice but it is very hard still hard but know they are in great hands
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,637 Posts
Never... I'd have to be homeless before I'd ever consider getting rid of my dogs.. and then I'd try to work something out (temporary solution) with family and friends..

I've thought about it myself but could never do that to my dogs..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
895 Posts
Actually I thought about it. I had the same situation with my minpin layla. Kenzo was so jealous of her and after I pet her, he would go and attack her, and he was sneaky in doing this harrassment. When layla was a baby, she was so afraid of kenzo, she would never get close to him. Then kenzo found a way to lure her. He would come with a toy inside his mouth and try to lure layla, in order to take her away from me and harrass her when I'm not her. This is freaking INTELLIGENCE. That is when I understood that Germanshepherds are so darn clever or something else in intelligence. But because of this, I regret to say I couldn't pay enough atatention to layla. This still makes me so sad at times when I think of this. I thought rehoming her, but I couldn't. It is a very hard decision to make. But I think under such circumstances, we think of our feelings first (human nature of course..EGOISM), then the good of our dogs. I couldn't do it. I would really admire someone who can do this under right conditions.

Musa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,131 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Musa, I understand completely, trust me, rehoming my dogs was never easy, but like you said, I had to think of my dogs' well beeing first and not me. Us people can be very selfish some times or worry too much about what other people might think.

I have no doubt they are living better lives now and even though I still miss them I don't regret finding them better homes because they deserved the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,870 Posts
In my mind, I would say I could never, but if a situation happened where it was uncontrolable yes I would, but again I feel like G-burg, I would have to be homeless. Again, I have never been in the situation though so I do my best not to judge those to that rehome. It has been such an epidemic it really is sad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,637 Posts
See I would mange my dogs time better.. There are many things you can do so one dog is not attacking another and still give each dog quality time..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,131 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
It is always easy for people, who are not in your shoes, to judge you. When you have a full time job, live alone with no help and have a bunch of other stuff going on in your life, it is another story.
Again, I was one of the ones who always said... I have to be homeless first, until you I found myself in that situation. Then it is when you have to decide what is best for THE DOG!
Why have a dog crated for hours on end when he/she can have full attention and run of the house with a loving family for example?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
979 Posts
I respect your decision for re homing your dogs. I definitely think that I would be able to do that if it was in the best interest of my dogs. Why would we want someone we love to be in a situation that makes them miserable everyday?

I really think that Never say Never is a good mantra for people. No one really knows how they would react to a situation until they are in that situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
29,131 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Originally Posted By: ShellyGI respect your decision for re homing your dogs. I definitely think that I would be able to do that if it was in the best interest of my dogs. Why would we want someone we love to be in a situation that makes them miserable everyday?

I really think that Never say Never is a good mantra for people. No one really knows how they would react to a situation until they are in that situation.
Exactly!!! Rehoming my dogs was not a decision I made in a matter of days, it was a matter of months, till I realized how miserable they were. Why put them through that? Just so you can show the world what a GREAT owner you are because you would never get rid of your dog? Well I'm sorry, to me a GREAT owner is the one that puts the dog's well beeing before anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
I could see if I was in that situation, I probably would. It would break my heart and be extremly tough, but knowing that the dog was not having a good life with me, and going to an awesome home with someone else who would give the dog a great life, I would do it. You did what was best for the dog, and not you, which is a hard but great thing to do. Of course I would try as best I could to make it work, but things don't always work out the way we want them to. '

I had a foster lab I had rescued from NC, she was an absolute doll. She and Katie got along famously, and she was just amazing. I toyed with the idea of keeping her, but we couldn't afford another dog at the time and were about to get married, and when this one woman came in to see her, with her 3 kids, it was just amazing. They loved her at first sight, their dog loved her, and really, she went to an A+ home, (they've got mucho bucks, she's never alone, walks a few times a day, beach house in the summer, swims every day) That was the best thing I could have ever done for her, and I miss her alot, but know in my heart it was the right thing for her, and thats whats most important.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,637 Posts
I can pretty much say NEVER!!!! unless I was homeless!

My son wants a dog so bad.. He's wanted one for the last year or so.. But I've had to tell him no, not until one passes on.. I have a nice, NICE working line male here that I'm raising.. whom I would LOVE to keep, but like I've told the breeder, I can't, not until one passes on..

I could have easily re-homed my two older dogs or returned them back to rescue but in my heart I can't and won't. That's my commitment to them..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,506 Posts
Oh my, that is a very scary question. I would love to say never, but I have learned never say never a long time ago. It almost sets the whole universe to work against you to prove you wrong, LOL.
Stuff that I think would be able to force me to do this:
- family member gets real, severe allergy attacks
- dog becomes aggressive to the family in a way we can not manage
- becoming homeless, or sg similar. (Moving? never, we moved two of our pack here from the EU, which I guess you could call crazy).

Never had the situation that you described, but it sounds though. I am very happy for you that both of your dogs are doing great at their new owners. I think that would be the hardest part for me, letting them go; that, and trusting somebody else with their care. Ever since I have been doing home visits I learned to mistrust my own judgement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,870 Posts
I think with the epidemic of "rehoming" and so many dogs that are at shelters people tend to judge quickly because they don't know you personally. There are so many excuses out there anymore that you really don't know what is legit, who is telling the truth, who just wants to make a buck (like those people who buy off of CL and then resell). Plus, all the things that you see on T.V. and more.

I feel every situation is unique and needs to be looked that way. I respect anyone who truly puts their pet (s) first no matter what and if that means that they need to rehome then they made the right decision for their family & pet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
I once thought I would never rehome a dog, but then ran into a situation where rehoming the dog was better than keeping the dog with me.

I got Tori when she was five months old - scared of everything and not socialized a bit. Took me years to work through it, literally, but she became confident and willing to greet strangers happily. She and I never really bonded like I've bonded with other dogs, though. I loved her, she loved me, I trusted her and she was a wonderful dog but something was missing.

She didn't take well to change and when I moved two years ago she had a really tough time. I took her with me when visiting a friend who lives on a 160 acre homestead and runs a small riding stable. When the two of them met, it was like love at first sight. Sallie had lost her old GSD a few months previously and had been looking for another GSD to share her life with (a life most dogs would absolutely LOVE). And I left Tori there with her. I felt awful at first but went back and visited frequently and could see that Tori had already adopted Sallie as her very own person (she'd always had to share me with the other dogs). And Sallie, within a week, was so attached to Tori that it would have broken her heart to take her away.

I still visit Sallie and Tori, and Tori is always glad to see me. But she will greet me and then run over and lean against Sallie. Sallie calls Tori her soulmate and is closer to that dog than she's ever been to any dog, I think.

I was perfectly willing and happy to keep Tori with me until she died, but someone else needed her more - and Tori needed that someone else. I never had the bond with her that Sallie does. It's incredible seeing them together.

The biggest problem I have with rehoming is when people use it just to get rid of dogs they no longer have a need for. I know chow breeders who, once their dogs have earned the titles or had their last litter, get rid of them as soon as they can. I just feel bad for dogs who are only wanted for what they can provide in titles or puppies and not because the owners truly love them. Too many breeders see dogs as commodities and not companions.

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
Leesa, you're raising a dog but you're not going to keep it? Isn't that kind of the same as rehoming (in a very broad sense)?

To me, if a dog lives with you and especially if you're raising it, then in essence you are the one building the bond with it. So sending it away to another home would be, to the dog, the same thing as rehoming since it's leaving the home it once knew.

I guess I'm looking at it from the standpoint of the dog, not the human. I absolutely love my dogs but if I couldn't give them the life they needed I would rehome before I'd make them unhappy. I'm GLAD that you think you'd never need to find homes for your dogs (and I respect your commitment) but I think there are angles you haven't truly looked at.

Melanie and the gang in Alaska
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,034 Posts
Originally Posted By: GSDBESTK9Why have a dog crated for hours on end when he/she can have full attention and run of the house with a loving family for example?
That is the point. Is the life you have with the dog better than the life someone else could give them? If not, then it's just plain selfish to keep the dog.

I have rehomed a dog and I would again. I purchased Gus after I had Neke and Tessa. My plan was to get Gus into either the show ring (where I was working with Tessa) or the obedience ring (where I was working with Neke). But Gus didn't have the structure for the breed ring and didn't have the drive for competitive obedience. He was just a big, lovable goof.

So while I was out working Neke and Tessa, Gus was stuck at home. Sure, sometimes I would bring him with the shows but he spent 95% of the time stuck in a crate. He really didn't want to do any training - all he lived for was playing fetch with a ball.

I was (and still am) close to the breeder I got the guys from and she knew Gus hadn't turned out as I had hoped. I told her it wasn't a problem - I would always keep him, that was the commitment I made when I bought him as a pup.

One day she called me and said she had a family looking for an older dog. The dog was a present from the grandfather to his granddaughter (with parents permission). The mom didn't want to deal with housetraining so they were looking for a dog 1-3 yrs old and they currently had an elderly dog so the new dog would have to be good with other dogs.

The grand daughter wanted a dog that would play ball with her. Their current dog was too old to really play alot anymore.

I was NOT really interested in placing Gus but I said I would bring him over to meet them. It was love at first sight - between Gus and the young girl. He never looked back and he was loved and spoiled until the very end of his life.

And he got to be with people almost all the time.

It was a better life than I could give him and THAT is the commitment I make when I get a dog - to give them the best life possible. If that is NOT with me then so be it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Speaking directly to your question, the answer would be yes if I was rendered physically unable to care for myself (and therefore my dogs) due to some catastrophic accident or medical event or if my home was ripped out from underneath me and my dogs needed safe shelter until I could put the pieces back together. However, for each dog I did have a backup plan of where they would go given the special circumstance of each during their lives if something happened to me. Thankfully, those plans never had to be initiated.

Otherwise, the answer is no. Every dog I've known had issues but the one compelling rule of our home is that everyone gets along. While many rocked the boat, only one dog categorically and emphatically refused to play by the rules: Jesse, (or "Miss Attitude" as my vet so lovingly called her) the Rottie found at 4 months old, tortured and left to die. My vet always told me that if I saved her she would be my single best and single most difficult dog for all my life. As Jesse grew, she would be the Alpha dog or die trying. Ultimately, we built Jesse her own "house" complete with all the comforts of home which allowed supervised play time with the other dogs but also allowed her to rule her kingdom in peace. She lived out her long life in great comfort and, most importantly, safely without a single incidence of aggression/bite history toward anyone (save Holly my sweet GSD who tangled with Jesse over who would get closer to me).

I would add that most of my dogs were rehomes and in each case the original owner had to agree and understand that once I accepted the dog, I would never give it up. I acknowledge I've been very fortunate in being able to care for all I have and Fate has certainly given me a break in the past.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,637 Posts
Quote:Leesa, you're raising a dog but you're not going to keep it? Isn't that kind of the same as rehoming (in a very broad sense)?

To me, if a dog lives with you and especially if you're raising it, then in essence you are the one building the bond with it. So sending it away to another home would be, to the dog, the same thing as rehoming since it's leaving the home it once knew.
I guess you can look at it that way! But it's not my dog and he's always been for sale..

Quote:I'm GLAD that you think you'd never need to find homes for your dogs (and I respect your commitment) but I think there are angles you haven't truly looked at.
Melaine~ The last two years of my LIFE have been ****, literally, more downs then ups.. and I still never thought about re-homing my dogs.. I make do with what I have..

Nor am I judging people for doing what they feel is best.. That's there choice.. I have my own set of values and beliefs!

Carolina asked a question and I answered!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,461 Posts
Even though I hate the thought of rehoming out dogs, I would probably do it if it was necessary. Both of our dogs have wonderful, happy lives with us. They are our babies so it's hard to imagine them being in better situations.

But, if something happened where both my husband and I became disabled or were unable to take care of them, it would be selfish to not do what's best for them.

I would be heart broken if for some reason, they started fighting like GSDBESTK9 mentioned Gala was doing with the Yorkie. I can't even imagine who would stay and who would go. That has to be one of the toughest rehoming scenarios in my opinion.
 
1 - 20 of 244 Posts
Top