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Discussion Starter #1
Can someone kindly fill me in on all those registered names for GSDs? Is there a system?
Everyones dog seems to be named "Vom something"! We are considering naming Osa "Osa vom shizalot" or how about "Osa vom whineyhiney" or maybe even "Osa vom landshark"?
FYI Osa means she-bear in spanish.... Her sire is named Golden Breeds Color Copy, but his nickname is "Z". We are trying to pick a name with a Z word in it...... any help? Dam was Golden Breeds Christmas Angel, call name Amber....
TIA:)
 

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Someone will surely come along to answer this better than I can, but it's a German way of naming dogs, where vom/von generally means of or from, vom being the masculine form and von being the feminine, if I'm not mistaken. So for example, my dog Remington von Berchtold - von, because I am female as was his breeder, Berchtold I chose as it was my family's original name when they came to America.

Sometimes whatever word follows von/vom is the name of the kennel who bred the dog. So for example, there's a lot of Wildhaus kennel dogs here, so you'll see for example that darling puppy Jinx vom Wildhaus, named for the kennel she was bred at, and so because it's "vom" and the breeder's name is Chris I think, let's assume that means he's a guy, lol.

But if the breeder gave you free reign to name Osa, like mine did, you can use whatever you choose, von or vom, and a nice word to go after it. Haha what's the German words for land and shark, I wonder? Mrs. K can answer that one!

So anyway, I need something to occupy my mind so I'll think of stuff and get back to you, lol! I hope I helped and wasn't too incorrect on anything I said, please edit my mistakes if I made any, fellow GSD-ers!
 

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Okay so I did a little bit o'Googling, my favorite name sites are behindthename.com and it's Behind the Surname counterpart.

So I searched for stuff that means amber, means bear, etc...

Some names that mean "Amber" in various languages:

Ambra/Ambre in Italian and French, respectively.
Electra in Greek Mythology
Gintaras in Lithuanian

Some names that mean either "bear" in various languages or have something to do with them in some literary or mythological way:

Araujo in Spanish (sounds cool)
Bahr in German (but one of the letters has dots over it)
Ayla - Apparently a literary name
Adalbern - Ancient Germanic
Arkadios - Ancient Greek
Berengar - Ancient Germanic
Kallisto - she was changed into a she-bear in Greek mythology
 

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Ok...I'm not good with long AKC type names....
But here's a thought.....combine mom & dad's names along with puppy's name?
Something like: Our Unique Copy of Christmas Zen.
Just a little thought on an option in naming.....(you wanted a Z name).
 

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The German naming system is a bit different than the North American naming system, but both protocols are used to identify the breeding kennel and the litter from which the pup came from. Many breeders do not use a system at all, and pups can be named and registered anything the breeders or owner would like to name the pups.

With the German system, each litter bred is named alphabetically. So the first litter bred by a kennel is the "A" litter, and all the pups will have names that start with "A", second litter is the "B" litter, and all the pups' names start with "B", and so on, followed by the kennel name.

Von/Vom/Von der, means "from", and the form will change to make it grammatically correct depending on the kennel name. In German, as in French, common nouns have gender. So for example, in French a table is feminin, in German, a house is masculin, so the adjectice or article or pronoun preceding the word needs to agree with the noun in gender.

To continue on with the example that Larien gave, the registered name of Jinx Vom Wildhaus indicates that Jinx came from the J litter bred by Wildhaus kennels. "Haus", German for "House" is masculine so the "from" part has to agree with the "House" part, and "Vom" is used in this case. The Von/Vom has nothing to do with the gender of the dog, or the owner, or the breeder, though this is a common for native speakers of English to mistakenly make that association since the concept of common, everday nouns having gender is pretty odd!

American naming conventions are more flexible, and more creative. They usually work into the registered name the name of the kennel or breeder or owner, the name of the parents (like what Robin suggested), and instead of using the alphabet to identify pups from the same litter (though some breeders will use the alphabet), they usually use a common theme.

So for one litter, the common theme may be "Fire", and all the pups have the word "Fire" worked into their registered name. Or the common theme could be sport cars, or precious metals, for example. I think there is one member on this board who got a pup from a litter that was born on Christmas day, so the common theme was, of course, Christmas!

Some breeders will name and register the puppies before they go to their new home, others will give the new owners the choice of picking a name, but it has to follow their particular naming convention, some breeders will ask that a particular naming convention be used by the new owners, but don't require it, and others don't use a naming convention at all, and the new owner can register their dogs anything they would like.

It is okay to use fun/made up names like the ones you were considering if the breeder did not require any specific naming system. One thing that is frowned upon is to use another breeder's kennel name. For example, someone may see a dog's name with "Wildhaus" and think to themselves: "Wow, my house is just nuts with 16 kids and 14 dogs, and 31 cats! Calling my new dog: Fifi Vom Wildhaus would be a perfect fit!!!" That would be a BIG nono, even though there is nothing preventing them from doing so.
 

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Sometimes whatever word follows von/vom is the name of the kennel who bred the dog. So for example, there's a lot of Wildhaus kennel dogs here, so you'll see for example that darling puppy Jinx vom Wildhaus, named for the kennel she was bred at, and so because it's "vom" and the breeder's name is Chris I think, let's assume that means he's a guy, lol.
Chris Wild is a lady. Vom/von has to do with if the word following it is masculine or feminine, not of the person is. Just like in Spanish or French, the words themselves are masculine or feminine, like el lapiz or la flor. It has nothing to do with if the person or thing is male or female.

You can have a little fun with names if you don't have a breeder that requires you to use a certain name. My late Cash was Cash Money vom Tierheim, which means from the animal shelter.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys!! That explains everything in detail... as far as naming conventions goes. I am just stumped on this name.....
Any help is appreciated
Breeder: Golden Breed Kennel
Sire: Golden Breed's Color Copy call name "Z"
Grand-sire: marhaven's Color Guard call name "boss"
Dam: Golden Breed's Christmas Angel call name Amber
The breeder wants the puppys name to be: Golden Breed's (something with a z in it)..... that is her convention.... but ultimately we can do what we want. One of the other pups is named "GB zoom zoom".. call name Mazda!! Now I wish I had thought of that!!!! I like the zen idea.... hmmmmm.... :)
Any others?
TIA
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Emoore and robinhuerta, Thanks! Love the zen ideas.....
 
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