German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
599 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, I have been trying to convince my dad that German Shepherds are amazing. He thinks they are too big, and did not want to get one. One night he told me to find one website saying that german shepherds were inside dogs. Guess what... I found seven. Two were from this forum and others were from sites like this forum, so that means they weren't just person, it was TONS answering saying inside. Still he said they were outside dogs. Then, I email GSROC( the rescue we wanted to get one from ), and emailed a lady who worked there. I told her about my location, and how I have coyotes, and what not, and she emailed back saying: "Hi Noah,

Do you have dogs now? Have you volunteered at all with the rescue and been around the dogs? We do not believe that German Shepherds are outside dogs and when forced to live that way they suffer from the exclusion. This breed needs to be with their families/packs. This is one of our most important beliefs at GSROC. That is why we do home visits for anyone who wants to house, foster or adopt one of our dogs. We want to make sure that our dogs will thrive inside the home with their new family and be in a safe place. If your yard is not secure from coyotes or mountain lions, no animals should be left unattended outside… especially right now. It is high season for coyotes. If you frequently have coyotes and mountain lions in your yard, I am sure you agree the answer is clear on that.
One of the reasons fosters homes are so important is so that a family can spend time with the dog and get to know them. We ask our foster homes to integrate the dogs into their families to get to know the dogs so we can place them successfully in a forever home.";

I showed him, and STILL he said outside only. Then a few weeks later my mom, my dad, and me went out to run some errands and stopped at Trader Joe's, and guess what was outside! A man with THREE german shepherds adopted from GSROC the rescue I mentioned earlier! My dad went inside and my mom took me to say hi. They both know how much I love GSD's. We talked and the first thing he said when I pet them was: You should get him one, they are wonderful dogs!; And my mom was like :confused: . I was telling him how I have always wanted one etc, and he said they were INSIDE dogs, he pretty much said everything I was telling my dad. The one thing was that they shed, but the man has three GSD'S and three cats and says he has 2 air purifiers, and brushes them daily and it was fine. P.S. he had them for 5 years, so he was an experienced owner. I told my dad, and STILL they are too big, outside ONLY! When I say outside I mean, NEVER EVER EVER come inside, their home is outside ONLY. Even though we have wild animals roaming around at night. So pretty much I gave my dad a lot of information on them, got seven websites saying inside dogs, got a woman working at our rescue saying inside, and a long time GSD owner saying inside. He still says inside. Every time I ask why he says, " Because they are." He says that because he had a GSD when he was younger, and his mom, my grandma, wanted them only outside. So, that is what he believes now. And my mom is the same way. He said he was still on board with fostering one, and he would help me convince my mom, but it was only outside. Finally, I told him," Dad, I don't want to foster a poor GSD, who needs to be shown compassion, and be shown love from people so, he/she can get used to have a forever home, and throw it outside and barely play with it. The point of fostering is to show the dog love, and get it comfortable around people, or take care of a disability it has, and it won't get any of that if it is neglected and thrown outside. I will not foster a dog for it to be treated as cruel as it was in its previous family or shelter." And that was that, getting a GSD was off the table. :( But I swear when I turn 18, I am adopting a GSD and will post her all over this forum. Well, I may not have a GSD, but I still love them. And I might get an Australian Shepherd, which is a shepherd... so it counts:)

Long Live GSDs!!!!! :gsdhead: :gsdhead:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,776 Posts
You might want to find a German Shepherd club near you, and get to know the owners and the dogs.

As with anything, the fantasy could be very different from the reality.
You need a real perspective on exactly what these dogs are, what they need, and if they fit your life and lifestyle.

You are in school and do not have the time it takes to care for any dog you would have, so your parents have to approve, since they would be providing both the care and financial support for any dog you bring into the house.

Even if outside, the dog will still need care and training and lots of interaction, and if your parents are not willing to do it, there is no point in twisting their arm to get a third dog.

Australian Shepherds are still shepherds and need a lot of time and training, and besides, there is no point in getting a dog that is not your first choice, just to get a dog.

Find a club, educate yourself, see if any of the owners are willing to let you spend time with them and their dogs, save money, and get one when you are physically and financially able to.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,235 Posts
I think it's very cool and responsible of you to find so much information to show your dad. And I love your passion for having them inside as family. Some day, when you get your German Shepherd, your going to be an amazing owner!!


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,820 Posts
Sorry about the not getting a GSD but I think you will be a great dog parent of any dog you chose and someday I bet I see you here on this site w/ your first GSD. Hang in there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,182 Posts
So, I have been trying to convince my dad that German Shepherds are amazing. He thinks they are too big, and did not want to get one. One night he told me to find one website saying that german shepherds were inside dogs. Guess what... I found seven. Two were from this forum and others were from sites like this forum, so that means they weren't just person, it was TONS answering saying inside. Still he said they were outside dogs. Then, I email GSROC( the rescue we wanted to get one from ), and emailed a lady who worked there. I told her about my location, and how I have coyotes, and what not, and she emailed back saying: "Hi Noah,

Do you have dogs now? Have you volunteered at all with the rescue and been around the dogs? We do not believe that German Shepherds are outside dogs and when forced to live that way they suffer from the exclusion. This breed needs to be with their families/packs. This is one of our most important beliefs at GSROC. That is why we do home visits for anyone who wants to house, foster or adopt one of our dogs. We want to make sure that our dogs will thrive inside the home with their new family and be in a safe place. If your yard is not secure from coyotes or mountain lions, no animals should be left unattended outside… especially right now. It is high season for coyotes. If you frequently have coyotes and mountain lions in your yard, I am sure you agree the answer is clear on that.
One of the reasons fosters homes are so important is so that a family can spend time with the dog and get to know them. We ask our foster homes to integrate the dogs into their families to get to know the dogs so we can place them successfully in a forever home.";

I showed him, and STILL he said outside only. Then a few weeks later my mom, my dad, and me went out to run some errands and stopped at Trader Joe's, and guess what was outside! A man with THREE german shepherds adopted from GSROC the rescue I mentioned earlier! My dad went inside and my mom took me to say hi. They both know how much I love GSD's. We talked and the first thing he said when I pet them was: You should get him one, they are wonderful dogs!; And my mom was like :confused: . I was telling him how I have always wanted one etc, and he said they were INSIDE dogs, he pretty much said everything I was telling my dad. The one thing was that they shed, but the man has three GSD'S and three cats and says he has 2 air purifiers, and brushes them daily and it was fine. P.S. he had them for 5 years, so he was an experienced owner. I told my dad, and STILL they are too big, outside ONLY! When I say outside I mean, NEVER EVER EVER come inside, their home is outside ONLY. Even though we have wild animals roaming around at night. So pretty much I gave my dad a lot of information on them, got seven websites saying inside dogs, got a woman working at our rescue saying inside, and a long time GSD owner saying inside. He still says inside. Every time I ask why he says, " Because they are." He says that because he had a GSD when he was younger, and his mom, my grandma, wanted them only outside. So, that is what he believes now. And my mom is the same way. He said he was still on board with fostering one, and he would help me convince my mom, but it was only outside. Finally, I told him," Dad, I don't want to foster a poor GSD, who needs to be shown compassion, and be shown love from people so, he/she can get used to have a forever home, and throw it outside and barely play with it. The point of fostering is to show the dog love, and get it comfortable around people, or take care of a disability it has, and it won't get any of that if it is neglected and thrown outside. I will not foster a dog for it to be treated as cruel as it was in its previous family or shelter." And that was that, getting a GSD was off the table. :( But I swear when I turn 18, I am adopting a GSD and will post her all over this forum. Well, I may not have a GSD, but I still love them. And I might get an Australian Shepherd, which is a shepherd... so it counts:)

Long Live GSDs!!!!! :gsdhead: :gsdhead:
You have to respect what your parents wishes are. It looks like your seeing that. You have alot of time to do it right on your own when the time comes.

What jumps out at me from your post is that your dad was raised much like myself. All animals live outside the house, meaning not in the same area we lived in. Some were basement dwellers, some were outside all the time. I had a stray GSD when I was a teenager. Found him and brought him home. I was allowed to keep him but outside/basement area. My dad still holds that dog in high reguards. He even named his last dog, a Rotty after him.

When I got out on my own and got another, she was also outside. Just the way I was raised. Go down the road a few years and had several more GSD's and finally I got smart. I trained him to be an inside dog. Was very easy. He lived loose in the house for 10 plus years and was part of the family literaly. Ate dinner at the same time though he had food all the time in the bowl. Slept loose in the bedroom, sometimes sneaking into bed with us.

What I'm trying to say is there is a connection thats lost between the dog and it's owners with outside dogs. It's like a wheel thats missing some spokes. Don't blame or be disappointed in your parents too much for the way they see things. Your parents are just missing that connection that comes with living with an inside dog to no fault of thier own. They were just raised that way. Your better off waiting until it's the right time to do it the way you want and on your terms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,354 Posts
I actually admire your parents for knowing what they do and don't want.

If you some how manipulated them to accept a situation they don't want and it didn't work out there could be resentment all around.

I see you have another thread polling about keeping dogs inside or out.

It doesn't matter what the poll says, it's your parents house and their rules no matter how wrong you think they are.

It is hard to be patient when you are young but sometimes it's the only choice you have.

Best wishes when you finally get a dog.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,116 Posts
and subsequently
German Shepherds are outside (funny term!) dogs. How possibly could they be shepherd dogs if they slept inside? Big wolf would have eaten the lambs at night.
GSDs left outside for night are generally happier and healthier. Their heart doesn't suffer from excessive heat in too warm house in winter and it is more interesting for them to listen to sounds of night instead of being depressed by your TV sound. When you are away from home outside life would simply be more exciting: birds, cats, insects, sounds...
But, of course, nobody leaves a puppy outside for night. You move your dog into fenced enclosure with a wooden floor in September for further adaptation to cold when he is about one year old. During the day time, when your family is at home, no doubt, for highly social GSD it is better to be together with the family.
So ...Fifty/fifty. Neither you, or your dad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,776 Posts
GSDs left outside for night are generally happier and healthier. Their heart doesn't suffer from excessive heat in too warm house in winter .
And what happens to their heart when they're outside in the heat of summer?:confused:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
599 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I actually admire your parents for knowing what they do and don't want.

If you some how manipulated them to accept a situation they don't want and it didn't work out there could be resentment all around.

I see you have another thread polling about keeping dogs inside or out.

It doesn't matter what the poll says, it's your parents house and their rules no matter how wrong you think they are.

It is hard to be patient when you are young but sometimes it's the only choice you have.

Best wishes when you finally get a dog.
Clearly you didn't read my whole post. Getting a GSD is off the table. Like I said to a person on my poll, just asking inside or out for fun. I am just curious...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,662 Posts
Well said...

....and some may not know this but the OP's family has two dogs now. One elderly and one younger, cockapoo I think, noted in a previous post.

So I think our young friend's parents have their hands full with kids, work and dogs already.




I actually admire your parents for knowing what they do and don't want.

If you some how manipulated them to accept a situation they don't want and it didn't work out there could be resentment all around.

I see you have another thread polling about keeping dogs inside or out.

It doesn't matter what the poll says, it's your parents house and their rules no matter how wrong you think they are.

It is hard to be patient when you are young but sometimes it's the only choice you have.

Best wishes when you finally get a dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,325 Posts
We have no yard, we live in a townhome and our GSD loves being inside with us.
That said, could it be the reason your parents do not want a GSD is because they are afraid that once you turn 18, you may leave home and may not be able to take your dog, leaving your dog in your parents care?

It happens quite often. I did that to my family when I was 19, my neighbors' son got a Rottie mix in high school and then got a athletic scholarship and the parents ended up with the dog until he died. You sound like you'd be a loving dog owner and I hope your life circumstances allow for a GSD sooner than later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,574 Posts
It is hard to be patient when you are young but sometimes it's the only choice you have.
It's often the wisest choice, too.

It seems like we've got a couple of younger posters lately who are fiending for dogs and plan to pull the trigger as soon as they can. I understand the wish but I can't help feeling that it's a mistake. There are SO many transitions and upheavals coming up real soon at that stage in life, many of them predictable only in their unpredictability. Having a dog at that point in life, IMO, is not fair to the dog and not prudent for the person.

When I turned 18, I moved several hundred miles away from home for college. A few years later I did it again for law school, and did it yet again when I started my career. During summers I moved all over the place to pursue internships, study abroad programs, and other opportunities. At no point during that period, whether working or studying, could I have done justice to an active and intelligent dog's needs. If I'd tried, I would have limited my own opportunities and still not done a good job.

Now I'm in a position to give a very good life to a dog. But I wouldn't have been back then.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,083 Posts
Now I'm in a position to give a very good life to a dog. But I wouldn't have been back then.

This and it's hard to understand when you are young. Your life can be so unstable for so long. That's why dh and I have a rule - we'll always have a dog or dogs, but DD cannot have a pet of her own, unless it's something we can eat ;)

A friend of mine was a butcher, had a small hobby farm, the kids kept hauling animals home, but not looking after them, one day they came home and their goats and bunnies were in the freezer, with their names written on the packages, he even had the one bunny hide tanned and put it on his daughter's dresser.
The kids are grown now, but you will never meet more responsible pet owners. Not saying that is a solution for everyone, but it drove a point home! I'm not saying the OP wouldn't be a good pet owner, just when you still live at home, your dreams of what life will be like once you are finally on your own are just that. Reality can be quite cruel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
Remember, if all goes well, you could have this dog for 12+ years. Where will you be in that time?

Where will you be living, what will be your occupation? Will you be going to university? Will you have long work hours, a long commute? Will you have a well paying job and a living in a house or apartment? All of these things factor into if/when you get any dog, much less a high energy, intelligent breed like a GSD. They require a huge amount of time and money, a lot of mental and physical stimulation.

I think you need to wait until you are stable on your own. I know it's so hard to wait. I had plans to get my first GSD. I was going to do all kinds of socializing, training classes, put it on the best food and go to a great breeder. I was going to have the perfect dog! Well, reality is somewhat different. Despite trying to do everything right, she's not the healthiest. I'm dealing with some allergy/immune system issues. She's reactive with other dogs.

I love her like whoa, and I would not give her up for anything. But her reactivity = extra $$$ in training. Her health issues = extra $$$ in vet expenses.

I also need a bigger car! lol

So all these things factor in.

What I would suggest, so you can get your GSD fix, is to see if there's a GSD rescue near you that you could volunteer at. I'm sure they'd love some extra help training/walking dogs, and it would help you get a more rounded out picture of what you are getting into one day and you'll be ready.

I know you'll get your dog when the time is right. It's hard to be patient, but your time will come, and you'll be all the better for it.

Good luck!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,544 Posts
I have to disagree with the remarks on age. I had my first shepherd, Cheeko, when I was less than 10 yrs old. I got Kiba when I was 15. I got Koda right before I turned 16 (a few months after Kiba passed). I turn 19 on Monday, and Koda is still with me. I have ALWAYS paid for my own dogs, my parents paid for nothing. I have always done their training, exercise, feeding, etc.
There are people of ALL ages who move around too much, have too much on their plates, aren't doing their research enough, etc and cause dogs to have unfair lives. To base it on a person being young (with no attention paid to their level of commitment to the animal) is ludicrous to me, personally. I had plenty of people, and still do have people, who assume that because I am so young I will not be/am not a good dog owner. When in fact, I treat my dog better than many treat their children (; Just my opinion

But, OP (back to the subject LOL)- If your parents are so against it, just listen to them for now. You can use the next few years to do as another poster said. Research, go to Schutzhund clubs and meet the dogs, sporting events/shows to meet them. Find out all you can about this wonderful breed, and what they require. Make sure that you understand the sacrifices you make at a younger age in order to be a good owner. Be 100% sure that you're ready for the responsibility. And for now, enjoy the two dogs you already have! :)


*** By sacrifice, I mean socially mostly. I don't get to just go out clubbing or partying with my friends. I don't just get to take off on vacation on a whim. I can't just decide I don't feel like driving home and stay with a friend overnight. Because I have a dog who needs me to take care of her. It's like having a child. To me, it's more than worth it. To MOST young people, it's too much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,574 Posts
It's not about being young or being uncommitted to the animal.

It is because, as you said, having a dog is a little bit like having a child, and I wouldn't recommend someone have a kid at 16 either. It makes it a lot harder to jump on all the opportunities that can be available at that age.

If you want to study abroad in London for eight weeks, it's harder to go. If you want to take an internship in Washington DC or NYC for three months, it's harder to go (there aren't too many affordable, safe short-term city sublets that will take a big dog!). If you need to spend two solid months flying out of town almost every weekend to a different city for job interviews, well, that's harder too.

If you're going to college, it's often harder or outright impossible to get on-campus housing (at my college, freshmen and sophomores were required to live on campus, where students are not permitted to have pets), and having a dog makes off-campus housing -- which is almost always shared with roommates -- a lot more complicated.

Of course there are lots of people who find ways to make it work, and lots of other people who plan to chart a different path anyway. But there's absolutely no way I could have handled a GSD at that time in my life, and I don't think that, at 17 or 18, I would even have realized how much was going to come along in the next few years. I just knew I didn't know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,544 Posts
It's not about being young or being uncommitted to the animal.

It is because, as you said, having a dog is a little bit like having a child, and I wouldn't recommend someone have a kid at 16 either. It makes it a lot harder to jump on all the opportunities that can be available at that age.

If you want to study abroad in London for eight weeks, it's harder to go. If you want to take an internship in Washington DC or NYC for three months, it's harder to go (there aren't too many affordable, safe short-term city sublets that will take a big dog!). If you need to spend two solid months flying out of town almost every weekend to a different city for job interviews, well, that's harder too.

If you're going to college, it's often harder or outright impossible to get on-campus housing (at my college, freshmen and sophomores were required to live on campus, where students are not permitted to have pets), and having a dog makes off-campus housing -- which is almost always shared with roommates -- a lot more complicated.

Of course there are lots of people who find ways to make it work, and lots of other people who plan to chart a different path anyway. But there's absolutely no way I could have handled a GSD at that time in my life, and I don't think that, at 17 or 18, I would even have realized how much was going to come along in the next few years. I just knew I didn't know.
Very true, I see where you're coming from. I should have read the FULL post. I saw age mentioned in a couple comments that were against OP getting a dog, and I felt like I should throw in the flipside (for people like myself and my best friends).
If you're willing to make the sacrifices, and capable of caring for the dog in such a manner then I think it's something to go for.
It's good that you realized you weren't ready for one at my age lol. Most realize that too late.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
599 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Guys. I already know getting a GSD is gone for good until I am 18 years old. And I am very responsible for my age by the way, and I would, just like GSDLoverr said, pay for everything, train it, etc. It would be my dog, and I would treat it like my child. As I do with my current dogs. Thanks for all the great responses :)
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top