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We got 'Q' at 81/2 weeks old. She is now eleven weeks and three days old. Good natured and very much a baby. I have been crate training her but, sometimes I lose track of her for just a moment and bam! She does her thing, in the house. I show her and tell her "NO" and put her outside until it is all cleaned up (again). We are staying the course and I know that someday I will get some rest. When she is in her crate at night as soon as she makes noise (usually about 0300) I get up, and carry her her outside. She does her thing and I praise her. Sometimes I can get her to go back into the crate, and about half of the time it is a game of Tug O' War or something for an hour or so before she koncks out again....What is my REASONABLE expectation of time for success to this house training exercise?

Q.JPG
 

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Your expectation should have been that she doesn’t go in the house in the first place.

What I did with both of my boys was never let them have any house freedom, therefore, no opportunity to go in the house. They were both either tethered to me, in the crate, or penned, and taken outside every hour, and also after every meal, after every nap, and after every play session.
Both made only one pee and one poop in the house, and all of these times were my fault.
There is no reason whatsoever for such an intelligent and clean dog to go in the house. The key is to stay on top of the dog, teach what “pee” and “poo” mean so she will go on demand, and praise like crazy, and never give her an opportunity to roam around and go wherever she pleases.
Also, seems to have trained you that nighttime is for playing.
Have her on leash, no talking, quick pee, immediately back in crate. Throw in a treat to entice her to go back in. She goes in, immediately, push her little butt in, no choice. That’s it. None of this tug nonsense.

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Agree
At her age overnight should be easy. But since you taught her to play at 3am this will take longer.
Pups and new dogs get no freedom in my house. My rule is eyes on or in the crate. No exceptions.
I go through a few days of running outside every few minutes and then we settle into a routine. Once you get her outside she does not get back inside until she goes. This is also the perfect time to teach her to go in an area specified by you.
 

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All my puppies were house-trained by 11 weeks. I don’t make mistakes on this. I mean, within reason. By 11 weeks, they were waiting by the door to signal they had to go potty on their own. If I had ignored their signal, of course they’d have an accident. But I didn’t. I took this VERY seriously.

If I didn’t have eyes on my dog, they were in the crate. I didn’t allow myself to lose track of them. Ever.

I am religious about this. I found that it paid off in spades if I did the hard work the first weeks.
 

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Every "accident" we had during house breaking was absolutely human error. If I caught my pup squatting I grabbed her up and repeated the whole way to the door...outside, outside. The minute we got outside I would put her down and tell her go potty. It didn't take long for her to catch on. I would say by the time she was 12 weeks she was house broken. I never, ever allowed play time in the middle of the night. It is something that easily becomes habit/routine. I would just put the pup back in the crate and go back to bed. Teach what YOU want not what the pup wants.
As an adult dog if I open the door and say go potty my dog goes out and goes potty. Done deal.
 

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All pups I’ve had house broken in a week no accidents. We’re in crate if I was not watching 100%. It takes a split sec to have an accident. I don’t give water after 8p. New pup brought home a month ago never had an accident and slept trough the night on day one. Very clean pup. If I let her out early and I want to sleep a bit longer she just goes back in the crate right away.
You need to not play with pup at all at night, just put back in the crate lights off done.
 

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So, we just got a new puppy to add to our family, and house training is fairly fresh on my mind. He's 10 weeks old.

The biggest thing we've done this time around to keep house-training tighter, and therefore faster, is to set a timer. Anytime the puppy is out of his crate in the house, we set a 25-minute timer. When the timer goes off, he goes out to pee. It's a guarantee that if we miss that mark, even by a few minutes, he'll go pee somewhere discrete. (At first we tried 30 minutes, but that was cutting things too close and we kept missing his cues.)

Whenever he's in the crate during the day, he can easily hold it for up to 3 hours at a time. Keep in mind, the puppy is allowed out of the crate for about 30 minutes - 1 hour every 3 hours during the day. This time is filled with play, training, attention, and supervised exploration/roam of the house. Putting him his crate teaches him how to be alone and self-soothe, gives our adult dog a break and attention, gives us a break, and gives the puppy time to sleep.

Because we've set a timer and are sticking to it, accidents are occasional and always a failure on our part (weren't keeping an eye on him, forgot to set a timer). As of this week, he has learned to go to the door when he has to go. I even witnessed him start to go pee on the carpet, stop himself, then change his mind and go to the back door.

So, in 2 weeks it's entirely possible to get your puppy at the state where he's alerting you that he has to go and knows he's not supposed to go indoors.
 

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It depends on the dog. My first GSD took about a month, both poop and pee. My current one...the last time he pooped in the house was the 3rd day after I got him. Pee...about a couple of months. It also depends on how you do things. I agree with others...you shouldn't be playing tug at 3am in the morning. You've got her into a routine of playing and now she expects it at that time. After she does her business, come back inside, put her in the crate or wherever you let her sleep, turn off the lights, climb into bed and sleep. She needs to get into that routine.

An option for you is....I like uninterrupted sleep. I can function better the next day that way. So I went to sleep later and took him out at a later time. Then I could get good sleep. So for example, I took mine out for the last time at around 1:30am -2am. Slept for 4-5 hours uninterrupted and just in time for the dog to wake me up around 6ish. If I took him out earlier, then I would have to wake up at 2 or 3am and then try to fall back asleep and then wake up 2 hours later. That doesn't work for me. The next day I'd feel like a zombie. So for me, uninterrupted sleep is the key.
 

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It really depends on you. If you are doing it right, there are almost no "accidents". It does vary by dog, I had one that was dependable within about a week, my current pup took probably three weeks to get to the point where he would consistently let us know by whining at the door. That doesn't mean that the dog was ready to be left completely unsupervised, just that it was at the point that it didn't require perfect attention.

Key things:
The pup must be taken outside immediately after every nap; immediately after playing, 10 minutes after drinking water; immediately when coming out of the crate; any time that the nose goes to the floor. If you are not actively watching the pup, it must go in the crate.
Another important thing is to take them outside to the area that you wish them to use and to have a command to go to the bathroom. Use a word that you don't commonly use for obvious reasons. Just say it softly each time they go to the bathroom, and before you know it they will basically go on command.
By the way, the dog that was dependable after only a week, made only one mistake, and it was absolutely my fault. Friends came over to see the pup and while we were at the front door greeting, I took my attention off of her.
Never give the pup more freedom than it is ready for, and everything will be fine.
 

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Wow, and I thought I was doing so good....I will change up........Ap
You are! Minor adjustments will solve everything. Our pup only had one in-house accident, completely our fault. And as others have said, when indoors, in crate, on lead, or at least in view at ALL times. They are the smartest sweetest dogs. You have 6 months of super strictness that will allow for (God willing) a decade or more of fun, protection, companionship, and pride.
 
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