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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bash had some diarrhea and was throwing up, so we took him to the vet today, just to rule out anything serious. I suspected this was a reaction to us trying Nupro with him (which we've since stopped), but since he's had a few parasites already, I just wanted to rule that out. While we were at the vet, the topic turned to his raw diet, and once I mentioned that Bash eats raw pork, the vet became concerned. I told him that the pork has been frozen for well over a month. He told me freezing does nothing to kill off parasites, and that raw pork should NEVER be fed. This vet does not feed raw, and while he is alright with us feeding raw, he's not a huge supporter of raw feeding in general. Have I been mislead about feeding pork raw? Is this vet correct? I obviously don't want to do anything that could harm my dog. So who out there feeds pork raw? Have you ever had any problems?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the link, Sunflowers. Bash has lots of intolerances, but pork is not one of them. He has done really well on it, so my heart sank a little when the vet said to never feed it raw again. :(
 

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I feed raw pork with no issues or concerns. People fear the parasite trichinellosis when eating or feeding pork. This risk is almost zero when feeding farmed animals, more risk if wild or game animals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, Saphire. I guess I need to stop being concerned when our vet looks horrified about the feeding decisions I'm making regarding my dog. He feeds kibble to his own dogs, so I shouldn't be surprised when he makes statements about raw feeding that are maybe less than accurate. I did get a whole speech today about biblical times and why Jewish people can't eat pork, so there's that. I just didn't want to completely discount a concern without doing further research and asking those who are more experienced with raw feeding than I am.
 

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I feed it without issue, but i cut the fat off certain cuts. Now I have ground pork with bone(I think it's Mistys favorite)They have no issues with pork liver or pork kidney. My oldest has thrown up a couple times, but I think it was because she ate fast and to much at one time. I go easy on beef hearts because they are on the rich side too.
 

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Thanks, Saphire. I guess I need to stop being concerned when our vet looks horrified about the feeding decisions I'm making regarding my dog. He feeds kibble to his own dogs, so I shouldn't be surprised when he makes statements about raw feeding that are maybe less than accurate. I did get a whole speech today about biblical times and why Jewish people can't eat pork, so there's that. I just didn't want to completely discount a concern without doing further research and asking those who are more experienced with raw feeding than I am.
Does the vet eat ribs, hot dogs or bacon?
 

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same here , raw pork hearts are a favourite, as are pork tongues , and lean ground pork which is often a sale item when bought in 3 pounds or more . No problems.
Occasionally they will keep pork necks (when I see some really meaty ones) , pork hocks - pork feet , pork skin (with fat removed) , pork snouts and an ear here or there.
 

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I believe he does. He told me to keep feeding pork, but to cook it first. He's only against raw pork, it seems. ;)
Well then the good vet should know that Jewish people don't eat pork cooked or raw:) I would have told him that my dog isn't Jewish:)
 

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I feed pork. Mostly hearts and pork shoulder. I do not feed organs. A local butcher told me that often the organs are infected with worms. So that he can plainly see them. I have feed organs bought from a commercial place prior to learning that and they were fine but they are also USDA inspected.
 

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I feed pork. Mostly hearts and pork shoulder. I do not feed organs. A local butcher told me that often the organs are infected with worms. So that he can plainly see them. I have feed organs bought from a commercial place prior to learning that and they were fine but they are also USDA inspected.
Good point. I buy my meat from a regular butcher so it's all human grade and inspected.
 

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I have fed pork often, it's great for hard keepers! Wild boar is what you need to worry about and it must be kept frozen for several weeks/months(can't remember) to kill off parasites before you feed. Commercial pork is perfectly fine though like Sunflowers said it can be too rich for some dogs and cause cannon butt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the input everyone. Thank you also for easing my mind on this! All of the pork we buy is regular meat for human consumption. I haven't given any pork organ meat, as I cannot find it near me. Plus, Roxy can't eat pork, so it's just easier to buy organ meat that they can both eat (beef, bison, goat).
 

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Ohhh parasites my microscopic love! :wub:

Warning: way too much info about creepy crawlies ahead.

There are three main parasitic concerns when it comes to raw pork. Trichenella spiralis, Taenia solium and Toxoplasma gondii. Both dogs and humans can contract these strains. There's also a handful of viruses and atleast a dozen types of bacteria as well but that's a whole 'nother story.

There is a reason that pork has been unacceptable to consume in some religious sects - it's a public health issue. Because swine are omnivores they will readily consume animal protein and are more likely to become infected with cross-species disease.

Trichenella has all but been eliminated in the US in confined herds. Pasture and free ranged pigs are the ones that are most likely to be infected with trich. In the US a few cases of trichenosis are traced back to pork each year, but it is rare. Like 20 cases with most of those being wild game.

T solium is the species of tapeworm that can cause neurocysticercosis. This is the one i fear most, I can come to terms with having worms in my bowels but in my brain - blech! Consumption of raw pork itself will not cause cysticercosis, it will manifest as taeniasis. However feces from an individual with taeniasis can cause cysticercosis. If you have small children in the house who might pet a dog around his tail area and then might put their fingers in their mouths, or if your dog is a poop eater. I would be leary of feeding raw pork. T solium is uncommon. Somewhere around 1000 new cases of cysticercosis diagnosed each year in the US and exponentially more taeniasis cases.

T gondii is the most common parasite in pork. Undercooked pork is a common way humans contract toxoplasmosis. In my parasitology lab we actually did detect the parasite in some samples obtained from local grocers. Something like 25% of all breeding sows are infected? *sigh* I'm too lazy to go find the study but the number is up there. Nothing to worry about though as you and your dog already have a good chance of having it. ;) The CDC estimates that there are about 60 million active human infections in the US the vast majority being asymptomatic. On a side note t gondii has been known to cause behavioral changes in infected individuals, just something to keep in mind in case there are ever seemingly random behavioral changes in your raw fed dog as it may be worth it to have your vet check for toxoplasmosis.

When it comes to post slaughter inspection. Trichenella,and Toxoplasma can not be seen by the naked eye. Tricenella most often infects muscles - samples are taken from the diaphragm, tongue and neck, and looked at under a scope. Tapeworm cysts can be visually seen but are often missed - up to 25% of the time, they often infect muscle. Other parasites such as Ascaris suum (porcine roundworm) go for organs and are very visually obvious so they pose little threat when talking about food bourne infections. There is always a risk for parasitic infection when feeding raw meat. Pork and fish are the more likely vectors due to their diet and habitat.

You vet was incorrect in saying that freezing does nothing. Freezing has been shown to kill off parasites. It's all about temperature and duration. A constant temperature of -10 degrees C at a duration of 10 days will kill off all of the above. The trick is to keep the temperature constant. Opening and closing the freezer will effect the kill rate.

All that said, I do feed raw pork every now and then. My guys eat mostly lamb and beef though. I keep my meat on ice for a minimum of 2 weeks, I deworm regularly, do blood work at each vet visit, and i visually inspect each piece of meat I feed. I also have been known to take samples and check them under a scope - but that's more of a hobby then my being overtly cautious. :p

Long story short, yes there is a slightly increased risk from pork as opposed to other raw meat, but for me the benefits of raw out weigh the increased risks. If raw pork is what my dog did best on I would feed it.
 

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Something I wanted to add - if parasites are a concern you may also want to stay away from ground meats.

Also, I have yet to find any wormy red meat bought from the store, However I have found tapeworm cysts in the abdominal cavities of grocery store bought whole fish many times. :sick:
 
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