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Discussion Starter #1
I am from Montana where obviously snakes disappear during the fall/winter/spring months. We now live in GA and am curious if anyone from the area knows if it gets cold enough for them to hibernate? We are in a very grassy/wooded area in middle GA (perry/Warner robins area) so they are fairly prevalent.

Also has anyone on here used the rattlesnake vaccination? Or know anything about it? I am very careful and attentive to Wick and where we go/walk/let him sniff but we are a hiking/fishing/camping family and so I was just curious about it.

Thanks for any information!
 

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I am in upstate SC and we have timber rattlers - don't really worry too much about the copperheads. Ours do hibernate. I don't know anybody that does the vaccination though I forgot to ask about it....... I do carry dexamethasone and injectable benedryl.
 

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We see Rattlesnakes and see a few bites each year in Maryland. Mainly in the mountains. We vaccinate if asked. The vaccine just lessens the response. Veterinary care is still needed.

Rattlesnake aversion training is a good idea for any dog that is going to be in areas with venomous snakes.
 

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I am in upstate SC and we have timber rattlers - don't really worry too much about the copperheads. Ours do hibernate. I don't know anybody that does the vaccination though I forgot to ask about it....... I do carry dexamethasone and injectable benedryl.
Thanks for your reply, is the injectable benedryl more effective than the pill type (I am assuming so since it would go strait into the blood??). What is dexamethasone? Were you able to get these from your vet?
 

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We see Rattlesnakes and see a few bites each year in Maryland. Mainly in the mountains. We vaccinate if asked. The vaccine just lessens the response. Veterinary care is still needed.

Rattlesnake aversion training is a good idea for any dog that is going to be in areas with venomous snakes.
Do you know if it works to lessen the response to all rattlesnakes or just particular types? Has anyone you given it to had a bad reaction to the vaccination?

I definitely want to do rattlesnake aversion training with him, I have read a little about it and it sounds like I would need to find a very reputable source for this.
 

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I know it works on Eastern Diamondbacks. But not sure about others.

In the dogs we vaccinated, none had a reaction to the vaccine.
 

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I have my SAR dog vaccinated. The vaccine for him causes a quarter sized swelling several days later that eventually dissipates. Doesn't seem to cause him any trouble. I chose to do this vaccine as gsdsar said, to buy him more time if he were to get bit. I know that he still needs to get to the vet fast.

Rattlesnake aversion is supposed to be okay. One thing, my friend's GSP did aversion training and was then bit but not because he was messing with the snake, he was just running through the field during a hunting training. He must have surprised the snake.

Best.
 

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I live in Central TX and do both the vaccine and aversion training with my dogs. I had a dog get bit by a rattlesnake years ago hiking and that was not a pleasant experience. She survived but was very sick and had a long road to recovery - this is not something I ever want to go through again.

Unfortunately you can take all the precautions but you never know what might wander into your yard. Earlier this summer while playing with the dogs I almost stepped on a rattlesnake crossing through the yard. Fortunately none of the 6 dogs there, including 2 small dogs, saw the snake were recalled without issue, but it could have been bad. :(
 

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In Georgia, don't forget about water moccasins (which aren't always in water--they like to sun themselves on decks on porches sometimes). They are aggressive and just plain nasty. A friend's large GSD died when one bit him in the face -- in her backyard in the city. There's no vaccine, and those stinkers are pretty common.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There are 6 venomous snakes that are common where we live and often seen around our home (haven't seen any yet myself TG). I watch every step we take and check the dog run before letting Wick off leash but it still scary. I cant seem to find any snake avoidance classes. Also I hear that you should wait till the dog is a year or older before doing it, does anyone have experience in regards to that? If you have done the training what age was your dog ? Wick is 8 months atm and incredibly curious still, he definitely chases everything that moves.
 

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the training class I put my dogs thru they recommend the dog be at least 6 months old the vaccine won't work on mojave green rattlesnakes
the class I've used uses the sight sound and smell of the rattlesnake and used the different rattlesnakes that are in my area to do the training
 

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I just don't think the classes are all that common in the SE. I know here we have copperhead, diamondback, timber, pygmy, coral snake, and water moccasin. The timber rattler is the most dangerous of them all. The coral snake has a very venomous bite but not a lot of penetrating ability with its teeth.
 

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I live in an area where there are absolutely no poisonous snakes. I read somewhere that it's due to a lack of selenium in the soil. One less thing to worry about. :)
 

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I live in an area where there are absolutely no poisonous snakes. I read somewhere that it's due to a lack of selenium in the soil. One less thing to worry about. :)
You are so lucky! Its hard to focus on training when I am also trying to check that every stick isn't a snake :eek:
 

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The more I read about venomous snakes and spiders all over the world, the more okay I get with Vancouver's ridiculous real estate prices.
 

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I just don't think the classes are all that common in the SE. I know here we have copperhead, diamondback, timber, pygmy, coral snake, and water moccasin. The timber rattler is the most dangerous of them all. The coral snake has a very venomous bite but not a lot of penetrating ability with its teeth.

yep those are the ones we have too, we live two hours south of atlanta.
 

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The more I read about venomous snakes and spiders all over the world, the more okay I get with Vancouver's ridiculous real estate prices.
Haha you get all the positives and none of the negatives! it really can ruin a good time, for example we went on this vacation to go flyfishing but we were both so scared of snakes the whole time that we only went one day, and spent the rest of the five days at the cabin :rolleyes:
 

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Haha you get all the positives and none of the negatives! it really can ruin a good time, for example we went on this vacation to go flyfishing but we were both so scared of snakes the whole time that we only went one day, and spent the rest of the five days at the cabin :rolleyes:
Well, the negative is that in many places of the US $300k can net you a nice house on several acres of land, but here that'll land you a shoebox-sized bachelor condo :smirk:. Still, I'm glad we don't have those poisonous buggers.
 
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