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Just curious about something. Had Keeta in for routine shots/exam yesterday. The vet (someone new) started off his annual exam by grabbing a treat and getting Keeta to follow his hand as he moved it around in circles on different planes, and moved it left and right.
He said he was checking to see if she had a normal range of motion in her neck.

Not that I'm complaining about an in-depth exam for possible problems, but is this routine? I've never seen this done before.
I was wondering if vets are seeing more dogs with neck injuries due to improper use of haltis, or whether he was worried about the prong collar that Keeta was wearing. Last year at another clinic, one of the vet techs who was handling Keeta tried to take Keeta's prong collar off by sliding it over her head. When I stepped in and un-hooked the collar, she was surprised and told me she had never seen such a collar before.
(for real?)

I don't know about vets and behaviour and training. When I brought Keeta in for her spay incontinence a couple of years ago, the vet told me that her own dog "couldn't" be housebroken, and lives in the basement because to that. It sounded to me after chatting some more, that she just couldn't be bothered by the effort to housebreak her dog, and keeping the dog in the basement was an easier solution.

Scary.
 

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I have never seen a range of motion in the neck being checked either for an annual...i assume they would only do it if you came in asking about a problem specifically with the neck. Did the vet check for range of motion anywhere else?
 

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Originally Posted By: CastlemaidNot that I'm complaining about an in-depth exam for possible problems, but is this routine? I've never seen this done before.
As dogs get older they are at a greater risk for slipping discs in their necks. I don't know how old Keeta is, but maybe the vet was just making sure because he thought she was holding it odd or something.

Quote: I don't know about vets and behaviour and training. When I brought Keeta in for her spay incontinence a couple of years ago, the vet told me that her own dog "couldn't" be housebroken, and lives in the basement because to that. It sounded to me after chatting some more, that she just couldn't be bothered by the effort to housebreak her dog, and keeping the dog in the basement was an easier solution.

Scary.
Unfortunately animal behavior is not offered in most veterinary schools. If a veterinarian wants to persue a career in veterinary behavior, they must complete a masters after getting their doctoral degree. Many don't have a lot of information about the topic, and there are only 2-3 texts written for veterinary behavioral medicine. And really only ONE has any information about medically treating behavioral problems.

I agree, very scary
 

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Originally Posted By: CastlemaidThe vet (someone new)
I think that's the key. In training, they learn to do very detailed exams, and with experience, learn which parts are appropriate, and which can be left out in each case. Someone just out of training may be extra thorough. They might also want to practice certain parts of an exam with many healthy dogs, so they will be better able to recognize an abnormal one, if they see it.
 

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I've never heard of a vet checking for range of motion in the neck but honestly don't think it's a bad idea. Ringer's disc problem in his neck "might" have been caught earlier had he been checked for range of motion during his annual physical.
 

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Like I said, I'm not complaining, but wondered if this check had anything to do with the common use of haltis (or rather mis-use of head halters, like jerking on it to correct a dog, or using it on a dog that constantly fights against it).

Thanks for your thoughts. So I'm not completely off by thinking this was new.

It was an odd exam though. The vet kept asking me if my dog was: vomiting, eating, dringking okay. Does she have diareah? Weakness in her hind legs? stiffness? When I answered no to all his questions, he repeated them, as if to make sure that I wasn't hiding information from him. I was thinking that if my dog had any of these symptoms, I would be very concerned, and my dog would be pretty much unable to be as active as she is. It is not something I would ignore and allow to progress, and then not even mention these concerns to the vet?

Oh well, if he hadn't asked any questions, I would probably have been miffed by that also (what? does he not care?). LOL, we're never happy, are we?
 

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Not just Haltis cause neck problems, but regular collars too!!

I agree with tncurt- the vet was prob. so thorough, bc she was newer. Once she realizes, that time is money
, she will change her exam procedure quickly. Wanna bet?!
 

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Originally Posted By: Castlemaid...
It was an odd exam though. The vet kept asking me if my dog was: vomiting, eating, dringking okay. Does she have diareah? Weakness in her hind legs? stiffness? When I answered no to all his questions, he repeated them, as if to make sure that I wasn't hiding information from him. I was thinking that if my dog had any of these symptoms, I would be very concerned, and my dog would be pretty much unable to be as active as she is. It is not something I would ignore and allow to progress, and then not even mention these concerns to the vet?
...
I wonder if your vet has studied breed specific problems? Every question he asked seems to fit into a lot of the more common health issues experienced by our GSDs though I don't think he needed to ask them twice. Personally I'd rather a vet ask me a lot of questions that are not necessary than not to ask any and then have one of my dogs misdiagnosed.
 

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i think its good that this vet was concious enough to be thourough with your dog. it does sound like he has studied breed specific issues, that and checking the range of motion in an older dog. i have seen this done before, and again, i think it tells you this vet is in tune with possible problems in the GSD. yep, i would certainly rather have a vet ask to many questions, than rush through the exam and not ask any. sounds like this vet is one of the few that go a bit beyond the norm.

debbie
 
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