German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have copies of Quynnes parents results and her sire had perfect hips and elbows and her dam had slightly less than perfect but only compared to the sire (2 points), very well within acceptable breeding levels.

Quynne was born Sept 29, 2004. She has not displayed any physical problems until yesterday when we were half way home from our walk before work. All of a sudden she started limping and I had to tie her to a post so I could run and get my car to pick her up ... she could not walk any further.

I got a vet appointment that day and there was definite swelling around the humerus. I (and the vet) thought it was wise to get an X-ray to rule out osteosarcoma - I also asked for her hips to be done in case it was cancer, to make sure she could cope with an amputation if necessary. That was done today and thankfully she does not have osteosarcoma and her hips are perfect. However, the X-Ray shows that she has ununited anconeal process in the right front leg.

Does anyone have experience with this surgery and any tips on rehabilitation and also coping with a very active dog during this surgery???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,796 Posts
I'll be interested in reading the replies to this thread.

When Mac started limping he was diagnosed with UAP - I was told by a surgeon at that time he was too old for the surgery - he was about 12 - 14 months old. He's 7-1/2 now and, knock on wood, hasn't had any more problems yet - I give him a joint supplement. The surgeon suggested giving him adequan injections if/when he starts having problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,005 Posts
Misha was diagnosed with UAP in BOTH front elbows last year.

She was limping after running; the vet said "Pano" (without an x-ray) so we were not overly concerned at first. We restricted her running, but she continued to limp. I changed vets; asked for an x-ray and he recommended surgery for her. They took out the piece of bone that was not "fused" together at the elbow. She will be 3 in June, and she had the surgery last year (when she was 2). She does not limp now and runs after her toys and plays and runs with Chaos like a mad dog.

Recovery time was pretty quick really. She was restricted on her running for about 4 weeks (walks on a leash, crated during the day) and then we could gradually add more off leash excerise.

Here she is wearing a shirt over her stitches; pathetic looking, isn't she?



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies and MaryLou she looks gorgeous and I'm very glad she has recovered so well.

Arycrest, the vet said first symptoms of limping usually present between 6-12 months and that is when the best result are achieved from the surgery; ie on young growing bone prior to any calcification which will occur on mature bone - this shows on Quynne's X-Rays. She said that it seems to settle down after that until the calcification causes arthritic pain ...... sooner, rather than later.

Quynne showed no limping at the critical time and she is walked every day so I would have noticed. The results may not be as good if surgery was done earlier but I cannot not do the surgery now especially after seeing the X-Ray. This current pain may have been from a piece if the calcified bone breaking off and that seems likely the way the joint looks. I'm so glad your boy Mac is doing so well - the vet also recommended joint supplements as it has proved helpful with this complaint.

All the best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Jean for both the luck and the suggestion, I didn't even know that about that group.


I'll look into it - this was totally unexpected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
I always thought surgery had to be done before 1 year. Quincy has UAP in the left front. Found at 20 weeks. No limping since that time. He is now 6 months. I am hoping it has closed since then. I will rex-ray at 8 mnths and decide.

I was given a very luke warm responce to the benifits of surgery. The doctor said it would slow the onset of arthritis but not able to say if it was a significant amount.

I agree that in your situation, with your girl being in such pain, your only option is surgery.

I would greatly appreciate updates as I am still on the fence on what to do with Quincy.

Best of luck with Quynne.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,796 Posts
Originally Posted By: mjb03I always thought surgery had to be done before 1 year. Quincy has UAP in the left front. Found at 20 weeks. No limping since that time. He is now 6 months. I am hoping it has closed since then. I will rex-ray at 8 mnths and decide.

I was given a very luke warm responce to the benifits of surgery. The doctor said it would slow the onset of arthritis but not able to say if it was a significant amount.
...
This is also what I was told when Mac was diagnosed.

I wonder if they've changed their protocal about performing the surgery after 12 months? If so I wonder if it would be too late for Mac. He hasn't had any more problems since the diagnosis, but who knows what tomorrow may bring, especially since old age is beginning to creep up on him - he'll be 8 in four months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
964 Posts
I was told this year as Quin is only 6 months. We caught it so early there was a second option open to us it was called an Ulna Osteotomy which needs to be done ideally before 6 mnths.

Our second opinion Doctor didn't seem overly encourageing on the outcome of EITHER surgery. Kind of felt damned if we did damnded if we didn't.

When our boxer needed Acl surgery it was an easier disicion because the TPLO was a complete fix of the leg. Great quality of life. We had to do two in two years so we now have a 10,000.00 plus boxer.

I would appreciate any info the OP comes across as the optimum time for Quincy is still available. For me it is hard since he shows no discomfort now.

We spent the extra money for a well bred dog this time to avoid all the expenxes of our byb boxer.

I realize it is a crap shoot either way but we have had an emotional and expensive six months with Quinn. Ido not want to put my head in the sand now though. If he needs this he needs it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,767 Posts
what a sweety. i am hoping and praying that all turns out well for you and your pup. mjb my heart goes out to your last statement about crap shoots. its true, but then again we take chances each time we bring a child into our life as well. we are only given what we can handle and for some reason, some of us see more health problems with our animals than others. i guess we were given these specific gsd for a reason. each and every one of them are truly angels sent from heaven. each one is here to teach us something. maybe for some of us, it is too teach us patience. who knows. all we can do is the best that we possibly can and hope that at some point that we win a lottery to pay for all the vet costs, lmao
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for your thoughts and I have an update.

Quynne's vet rang us today and having spoken to the surgeon who she recommended and (even after examining the X-Rays) he also indicated (as dicussed here) that there will NOT be surgery for Quynne ... the window is closed. It will be managed by Glucosamine Chondroiton and a course of cartrophen injections if and when required.

I hope we are all as fortunate as Arycrest's Mac and here's hoping he also continues to be asymptomatic - maybe the joint formulas are one of the better treatment for this.

I don't know what to think at the moment. Quynne seems back to normal but it has been a very up and down few days - emotionally as well.

As Bearlasmom indicated we are very fortunate to have these dogs in our lives and I would not give Quynne back for one second.

Hugs to all of you and your puppers.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top