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Discussion Starter #1
After reading the sticky and other threads on this I have a few questions.

I plan to spay Emma at 6 months, before her first heat. Several of the local vets I have used or are available indicate this is the best time. She just turned 4 month old, so I have some time.

No one close has any of the robotic or laprascopic equipment. One has a laser scalpel set up. So how do I choose which one?

Prices vary as to what is included. $200 complete to prices for everything as needed. Some require a wellness check before, some dont or is part of the package

All appear to be one day with no overnight stay. In at 8, out at 5

What questions do I ask?
Cost
Complications
Urinary issues
How many have they done
Who does the work
Size of incision
Tack the stomach
Leave ovaries (partial)
Activity restrictions - stares up/down to go potty
Do I visit operating room - what equipment should be there

Thanks
 

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No offense, but I would not ask any f that beyond,

1. Cost
2. Activity restrictions
3. Exam- if the Vet does not require a wellness, I would go elsewhere. Unless its the Vet that has been seeing her regularly.

Most Vets, by the time they are out of school a year have done 100 spay. If you like a particular Dr at a practice, ask for them to do the procedure.

I have no way of telling you what to look for in Sx suite. It's a table a light and an anesthesia machine and a monitor. I am a tech, and describing in detail what a layman should be looking for,beyond general cleanliness would be tough. Someone may jump in.

If the office is clean and orderly, bets are the entire hospital is.

I would choose the Vets office that you have a relationship with. Who is doing her vaccines and puppy wellness? Why don't you want to use them?


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Do you have a regular vet? All of these things should be explained to you and if not there is nothing wrong with asking.
 

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I also would use your regular vet. Sometimes they will ask if you want a kidney/liver function test (which isn't free), I usually do it, especially if I have never done one, or it's been a few years in between knocking them out for something.

My vets keep a female overnite. Most vets will give you a complete set of do's and don't's when you pick her up..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here is my dilemma. In the time I have lived here I have used 3 vets (excluding our old horse vet). I had one previously for my golden. he and the office did a very good job for my dogs and cats. Cat still goes to him. However I have had some billing issues from time to time (extras added in)

I also had to use another hospital when Buddy had his congestive heart failure. Normal vet was closed. They were very good in their recomendations and options not forcing expensive tests on us. The knew the age (he was 13) and that it was probably time, but offered other options (expensive testing). From experience I knew what we were up against. They said they could put him down, or we could go to the human society if I chose to put him down later, which we did after a few hours thought (he got much worse suddenly). They are not cheap. However this facility does have the better sergical set up, including the laser scalpel.

My third vet I found was recommended by a neighbor and is right around the corner from the subdivision. I wanted to check them out for my horses anyway. This is the vet giving Emma her shot series. I went to this vet when I brought Emma home as she was the only vet that had time that day (actually made time). Next week Emma will be done with her shots.

However I don't yet have a 100% comfort level. There is a big difference between shots and spaying. The vet is not as hands on as the others I have gone too. For her shots, it's just the shots, no real check over. The other vets would do a quick check as part of the shots, not a welleness check, but a good once over. Also in doing the wellness checks the others seemed to take more time. This vet seems good, but Im just not there yet.

Thus my search to have my questions answered.

In some ways I look at some vets as specialists - like we look to specialist doctors for our own ailments. I have a horse under the care of a doctor 2 hours away, because they specialize in her problem (she is allergic to certain hay pollens) They are also a large animal hospital - 40 years of practice too. I have even considered in using him too as he owns a GSD.

So I was looking for a vet that is better or the best at Spaying - after all it is a major operation.

Sorry for being so long.
Thanks
 

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I guess I would look at who you have the best relationship with, coupled with who you feel would do best for your girl. I would ask around - if there are rescues or shelters in your area, they may have some thoughts. It helps though if you know the person recommending is pretty clear on what they are looking for.

I always ask for or get:
Check/wellness exam
Pre-anesthetic blood work - and ask to call me if anything is off at all
Fluids
What will they use for pain management
What kind of anesthesia and pre do they use
Buccal mucosal bleeding time test
Will they consider watching out for MDR1 drugs if I ask

I actually make "the list" that I take with me in the am, along with some other OCD things. It is a reminder of everything we've talked about and all my requests. I also include information on any medication AND supplements that the dog is getting (which I typically stop all supplements including things like fish oil 2 weeks in advance http://dogaware.com/health/surgery.html#before that link has more good info that you might like).

It's always nice to know if they use stitches, glue, whatever for incisions. I am just curious and always ask why they chose what they choose - my vets are used to my questions, thankfully.

I can't help you make the decision but those are some of the things I do and have done for a number of surgeries, spays/neuters. I don't care how many times you take a pet through it, there are always things you can learn. Good questions.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Had a good chat with my vet for Emma today and got to see her facilities and learn more on her experience. She practiced previously in Alaska at a large clinic and did manly surgery's for 10 years. She wanted a new start and came to my town about 6 years ago. Her degrees are from Cornell too.

She showed me her surgery room. It was clean an neat with all the equipment needed including ultra sound, digital x ray. and heart mentoring (all vitals) Everything was well arranged too. I asked about the urinary issues and she said yes if you botch things it can happen. In her 20+ years she has only had a couple of issues, mainly on older dogs. She does the work, along with a qualified vet assistant and has a vet in training doing an intern ship with her currently.

She also explained that she uses 3 layers of sutures - Is this common? Has something to do if dog removes the outer layer, everything will still be fine.

However she does not normally use an IV set up for this procedure as it is usually not needed and can be added quickly. She feels the cost savings outweighs the need.

I mentioned the other places I checked out and she did not bad mouth any of them and said the were all good. One is corporate owned and do a lot of preventive stuff (the IV) as part of their packages. They were the most expensive as I mentioned above.

My comfort level is much better - still need to think about it.

Thanks
 

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She will be fine :) Spey/Neuter is a vets bread and butter :) You would have to be very unlucky for something to go wrong :) Definitely do a pre anaesthetic blood work tho!

My Vet did not give IV fluid either as she said it's not necessary but I know she would add it if it became necessary during surgery.
(she did use IV fluids when I had a tail docked tho as she knew the insurance would cover it).

3 layers of sutures is normal, if the dog does rip out the outer layer she will still be holding together with internal sutures :) There is also several layers of tissue that get stitched :)

From my own personal experience a fully grown dog seems to get knocked around by a spey/neuter more than a younger pup. (this is just my own observation)

Good luck :)
 
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