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Your son at seven years old, granted there isn’t any underlying issue, should be able to grasp what is and isn’t acceptable behavior to the dog. Many GSDs are not cuddly dogs either and are more hands off, but not all. Mine thinks he is a lap dog and we spoon in bed. GSDs can be challenging but I’ve found the opposite, their intelligence and willingness to please makes training easy from a young age. EVERY dog needs consistency. Drives and energy levels will differ based on lines and individual temperaments but in general GSDs need routine, daily exercise and enrichment. If there is a rainy day and I can’t let mine out to burn off steam then they drive me nuts with whining, pacing, and I can’t say I blame them. They’re bored! Smart, able dogs are not content to lay on a couch all day. I host treasure hunts where I hide bits of treats around the house and have them go sniff em out when stuck indoors. Mental wear works too!

Even your Golden, even though he hasn’t yet, could react adversely and bite your son if he hurts him with his roughness. IMO GSDs are less forgiving and less likely to forget and overlook ill treatment by someone than other breeds. It’s best to wait til a dog is at least 2 before adding another, it has to do with littermate syndrome and young dogs bonding to each other rather than everyone. Opposite genders are also highly recommended as they are much more likely to get along. Having to rehome or spend years of the dogs life crating and rotating is a nightmare for all involved.
 

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I have to ask why you think it is OK for kids to treat dogs this way.
What you have described is a disaster waiting to happen.
Seriously injured kids, and dogs that are put down because respect for animals wasn’t taught.

Please consider changes in the way the children interact with the dogs, before something serious happens.

Have the kids feed them. Throw a ball. Teach them tricks. Establish a loving and respectful relationship with creatures who had no choice over being brought into the home in which they live.
I didn't endorse this behavior but used it to illustrate that Goldens are far more forgiving than GSDs. Please let's not derail this thread into your recommendations as how my family should behave. Consider your message received.
 

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My post is in line OP describing her son’s interaction with the family dog.

This is a dog forum, and we all express our opinions. Mine happens to be that any dog will bite if it decides it has had enough, however, big dogs are a bigger danger, and GSDs are in a league of their own.

A dog shouldn’t have to be “forgiving.” It should be treated so that there’s nothing to forgive.
 

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My son is 14 I still remind him to stop teasing let them sleep. Respect for dogs cannot only be taught once to a child it has to be reminded repeatedly. So let’s not pretend it’s black and white. My son also was in your face enthusiastic fearless little boy who had be repeatedly told. Boundaries are a priority and a must especially with this breed and I believe of males in particular but kids are kids and they are not robots they are impulsive little human beings. Impulsiveness is something to be expected in young kids and young dogs alike. Some kids are more impulsive then others. It is so important to be real and know your dogs comfort levels. It is so important when you choose a dog with young kids you choose them carefully. Otherwise they will always need to be separated. My first gsd old and arthritic has to be separated when not supervised. he was in pain and old and I would not expect him to have the patience if someone fell on him. He reacted to quick. One time our kitten running down the hall way slid right into him he was still sleeping and flailed around hitting the kitten with his tooth accidentally making him bleed. He was a great dog but he was uncomfortable if his space was invaded as he slept as told from previous and owner and what I saw with the kitten. It was respected and I would not put him in that situation nor my kids who came after him. I choose to get a King Charles when my kids were toddlers as I not the energetic or the heart for a gsd. The shepherds we have now I had them since pups my kids 10 and 12 at the time. My kids are very hands with the dogs but in your face affectionate with the dogs. I made sure pups were well versed at getting a kiss or hug in the middle of their sleep. I made sure they were never bothered when eating and always swapped out anything with a bigger treat if taken away. I increased my knowledge with obedience and went out of my way to do different things with the dogs to keep their minds fresh and content. Interactions were structured. No chasing, no rough housing. As soon as bringing max home I bought agility equipment for Xmas and that is how they played teaching them tricks. He went to toy r us to shop during the awful winter. Ran down the private road at night pulling sleds as a young pup. My male can take some teasing from my teen son but it is not allowed. Max will get in the middle of anyone who gives me a hug with passive aggressively with kisses. If I sit on the couch and the kids sit next to me max will wAnt to squeeze in or sit on me. He gets reminded of his boundaries. I correct. I have a autistic nephew. I have young nephews that tries to prompt the dogs to chase them Luna is game she likes to follow them around- Boundaries rules always being reminded. It is why though I do really appreciate my dogs clear heads and their temperaments but that also is because boundaries, training and reminders in place. My kids actually wAnt German shepherds when they are out an in there own and I’m so happy about that. My daughter wants to be a veterinarian and my son a marine biologist - the right dogs can be powerfully motivating to kids and be inspiring.
 

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My son is 14 I still remind him to stop teasing let them sleep. Respect for dogs cannot only be taught once to a child it has to be reminded repeatedly. So let’s not pretend it’s black and white. My son also was in your face enthusiastic fearless little boy who had be repeatedly told. Boundaries are a priority and a must especially with this breed and I believe of males in particular but kids are kids and they are not robots they are impulsive little human beings. Impulsiveness is something to be expected in young kids and young dogs alike. Some kids are more impulsive then others. It is so important to be real and know your dogs comfort levels. It is so important when you choose a dog with young kids you choose them carefully. Otherwise they will always need to be separated. My first gsd old and arthritic has to be separated when not supervised. he was in pain and old and I would not expect him to have the patience if someone fell on him. He reacted to quick. One time our kitten running down the hall way slid right into him he was still sleeping and flailed around hitting the kitten with his tooth accidentally making him bleed. He was a great dog but he was uncomfortable if his space was invaded as he slept as told from previous and owner and what I saw with the kitten. It was respected and I would not put him in that situation nor my kids who came after him. I choose to get a King Charles when my kids were toddlers as I not the energetic or the heart for a gsd. The shepherds we have now I had them since pups my kids 10 and 12 at the time. My kids are very hands with the dogs but in your face affectionate with the dogs. I made sure pups were well versed at getting a kiss or hug in the middle of their sleep. I made sure they were never bothered when eating and always swapped out anything with a bigger treat if taken away. I increased my knowledge with obedience and went out of my way to do different things with the dogs to keep their minds fresh and content. Interactions were structured. No chasing, no rough housing. As soon as bringing max home I bought agility equipment for Xmas and that is how they played teaching them tricks. He went to toy r us to shop during the awful winter. Ran down the private road at night pulling sleds as a young pup. My male can take some teasing from my teen son but it is not allowed. Max will get in the middle of anyone who gives me a hug with passive aggressively with kisses. If I sit on the couch and the kids sit next to me max will wAnt to squeeze in or sit on me. He gets reminded of his boundaries. I correct. I have a autistic nephew. I have young nephews that tries to prompt the dogs to chase them Luna is game she likes to follow them around- Boundaries rules always being reminded. It is why though I do really appreciate my dogs clear heads and their temperaments but that also is because boundaries, training and reminders in place. My kids actually wAnt German shepherds when they are out an in there own and I’m so happy about that. My daughter wants to be a veterinarian and my son a marine biologist - the right dogs can be powerfully motivating to kids and be inspiring.
It is black and white in my house. I had 5 dogs when I had my first child, followed by another child 18 months later. My children were 1. Never left unsupervised with the dogs and 2. Boundaries were taught to them when just toddlers. I do not tolerate man handling or rough housing with any of my dogs. My kids have never stepped out of line with the dogs. It is a parents responsibility to teach their children how to behave and to protect their dogs from inappropriate interaction regardless of what breed you have.
If this is not possible, you’re not ready for any dog to be in your home.
 

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@Saphire Toddlers need supervision read my post. Kids need reminding. It is normal to remind kids what they need to do. Not sure what you are talking about manhandling and have no clue what goes on in your house. You sound like you need a glass of wine or some sugar.
 

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@Saphire Toddlers need supervision read my post. Kids need reminding. It is normal to remind kids what they need to do. Not sure what you are talking about manhandling and have no clue what goes on in your house. You sound like you need a glass of wine or some sugar.
@Saphire Toddlers need supervision read my post. Kids need reminding. It is normal to remind kids what they need to do. Not sure what you are talking about manhandling and have no clue what goes on in your house. You sound like you need a glass of wine or some sugar.
You don’t choose a breed based on your inability to teach your kids appropriate behaviour. My children learned very quickly with how to treat animals and they were toddlers. Because they were not unsupervised with the dogs, I was able to correct them before they did something wrong, not after. At 14 yrs old, your son should be long past teasing and bugging your dogs.
 

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Sometimes he can be a little pesky to the dog and give him a friendly push here or there.
Whew. Forums can be a rough place. I quoted the OP’s description above. It may be that the definition of “pesky” varies from person to person. But I didn’t read this as meaning the OP’s child doesn’t respect dogs, just that he’s a rough and tumble boy.

@germanshepherdontario, I do agree with many of the others as far as adding a second dog. If the GR is only one year old, he probably needs more time before bringing home a second dog.
 

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@sapphire I choose all my dogs that I owned and own by lifestyle and time to give. You certainly are not capable of taking my superiority away as quality parent or pet owner because it just can not be done. Your own perception of teasing or maybe what you surround yourself is why your thinking of teasing is a lot heavier then mine I assume. It is inferior thinking that kids will never be reminded of rules. Toddlers need constant guidance and often repetition they learn through repetition. Toddlers fall and trip even if supervised and always careful as my dog was old and in pain. He may have not handled that well or expected to.
 

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I can only speak from my own experience. My husband and I have owned four German Shepherds, three shelter-adopted and one purchased as a four month old puppy. Adopted first one in 1999. She passed away age 12 and we adopted our second in 2010. He passed away age 9 from cancer last year. We then purchased a four month old puppy (nightmare!) that was taken back to the breeder at seven months, and now have our fourth GSD whom we adopted from a shelter and have had for over a year. Our only child, a son, was born in 2003 and is now 16. He has never known a home without a GSD. These shelter adopted, no doubt back yard bred, fur babies have all been incredibly patient and amazingly intuitive in knowing how to deal with him. If you truly want a GSD for your home, not to keep your other dog company (our GSDs have always had only cats for siblings), but just because you want to add one of these beautiful animals to your family, then consider finding a GSD specific rescue and adopting an older dog in the 2-3 year age range. Trust me, puppies are an incredible amount of work. A reputable rescue will make sure the dog's temperament is a good fit for your family before adopting them to you and they will give you a trial period to live with the dog and see how it works out and will take it back if it doesn't. The dog will already be house-trained and many rescues will have worked on basic commands with the dog too. Also, my impression is that many people on this forum have working line GSDs. If you want a more laid back dog, go for showline GSDs. All mine have been very chill, except for the puppy that turned out to be working line. They are super energetic intense dogs. Don't go there! Whatever you decide, best of luck : )
 
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