German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,859 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was talking to my parents about it and they seemed interested in it.

But I wanted some answers to some things.

Once you get the CGC what exactly does it allow the dog to do? Does it allow you to bring your dog into stores with you? Bring the dog into like Starbucks or something? What are the benefits of the CGC, besides knowing you dog is a good citizen.

I think it would be worth getting this, but I need some more information on it.

Thanks in advance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,206 Posts
It isn't a service or therapy title, just a good citizenship test. For me it means I know my dog is sound to be exposed to new things, people and environment. Peace of mind more than anything.
Onyx passed it twice, but I still would never have her around small children...I don't trust her enough and she isn't around them enough to proof her on it. So I take it with a grain of salt in our case.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
From what I have heard from a few people, it can also sometimes help with getting homeowners insurance and if you ever have your day in court.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,836 Posts
I have heard that some homeowner's insurance companies might take the test into consideration if the breed is on The List.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,840 Posts
It's basically what Jane said, a good citizenship test. It shows your dog (and you!!) have done a good job in learning how to behave under different circumstances. Some insurance (and landlords) types might take it into consideration but there are no guarantees there. It is a good certificate for you (and anyone else, IMO) to work towards however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
594 Posts
As a certified CGC Evaluator and class instructor, I get this question all the time.
CGC is a certification program designed to reward dogs who have good manners at home and in the community. It is a 2-part program that stresses responsible pet ownership for owners and basic good manners for dogs. It is NOT a service dog, working dog, therapy dog, or other type of certification. It is NOT a temperament test. Dogs can be tested at less than 12 months old, but AKC recommends that the dog be re-tested after 12 months of age. To receive the CGC Certification, you and your dog must pass 10 tests performed for and "judged" by a certified AKC evaluator. The 10 tests are: accepting a friendly stranger, sitting politely for petting, appearance & grooming, out for a walk (walking on a loose leash), walking through a crowd, sit-down-stay in one place, come when called, reaction to another dog, reaction to distraction, and supervised separation. Dogs must pass all ten tests. They must not demonstrate aggression (biting, growling, barking, lunging, etc) at any point before, during, or after the actual evaluation. Extreme shyness or fear may cause your dog to not pass. Dogs may not urinate or defecate during the evaluation. The benefit to earning the CGC is a)you know your dog can pass the tests b)an evaluator who is unfamiliar with your dog has verified that your dog can pass the tests c) it can help you to recognize problem areas you and/or your dog have so that you can continue to work on them and d)it is a great first-step to continued obedience training. You can find all about the CGC at www.akc.org/events/caninegoodcitizen.
Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,460 Posts
EchoGSD summed it all up in a neat package.

I would like to add (since all of our dogs have earned their CGC) that if the training is done properly you will indeed have a dog that you can feel confident in. By the way the training routine is no piece of cake - the dogs have to EARN this "diploma".

As far as stores are concerned, there are many that will allow dogs as long as they are on leash. This includes most of the pet supply chains. Some other specifics (in our area) Lowe's, Home Depot, and Tractor Supply.
:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,836 Posts
Some dogs can pass the test cold. But your best bet is to sign up for a set of classes that terminates in the CGC test.

Four of my dogs have taken the test at a Specialty show (without specific training) and three passed. Arwen was beyond the obedience level of CD when she was tested. She did everything with precision, and though she had NEVER experienced it before. I handed the leash off to the supervised separation person, told her to down, and stay, and she never moved a muscle until I came back three minutes later.

The others were not ready for the test, and two of them passed by sheer luck. The third flunked, but I was just taking one for the club (supporting the club by entering my green puppies).

I do not know how getting a piece of paper rewards our dogs. I think it rewards the acheivement and progress that the handler and dog have made. It indicates a level of training.

Hopefully, it spurs people to continue. I think that this is why dogs that I would fail, often pass. If you fail with your dog, I think some people will take the class again and work on it. Others will just be disheartened and give up on training.

The CGC is just a beginning, perhaps a bare minimum of training to live with a dog. To be a decent companion animal, they have to know how to sit and down and stay and come, they have to be able to manage a trip to the vet, they have to let us touch their paws and ears and accept grooming.

When people pass this test, they should feel energized, knowing their dog can succeed and enter more classes and maybe trials.

I can put a CGC on my dogs between six and ten months of age, put them in a kennel and never do another thing with them. Three years later, they may sit and stay and down, but they may not be safe around dogs or people. They may totally freak out when a couple of pans hit the floor. I do not know, I have not tried this. The point is that training is an ongoing thing. The CGC should help people begin the process, especially socialization.

I mean, really all of us can read a book and teach a dog to sit by bringing the treat up properly until the dog is looking farther and sits their haunches. We can teach the basics on our own. But the class provides socialization encounters and practice with dogs and people. Hopefully a good instructor can step in and help us if we are doing anything really ignorant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,859 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I saw a video on youtube and some people were walking their dogs through Macy's:eek: I was wondering if we could walk them through the grocery store.....but if not thats cool. Alot of the places near me don't allow people to bring in dogs unless the dog is an seeing eye dog or dog for the disabled.

But there is a Petco and well we are definately allowed to bring our dogs there.lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30,390 Posts
In PA, it is illegal to bring a NON service dog, into a place that sells food. We can bring service dogs, service dogs in training, but not pets or even therapy dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,250 Posts
I saw a video on youtube and some people were walking their dogs through Macy's:eek: I was wondering if we could walk them through the grocery store.....but if not thats cool. Alot of the places near me don't allow people to bring in dogs unless the dog is an seeing eye dog or dog for the disabled.

But there is a Petco and well we are definately allowed to bring our dogs there.lol
Unfortunately, a lot of people abuse their priveledges or don't understand the rights that certain certifications grant them. The GCG, like stated, doesn't grant you any permission or rights, but many people think they're like a service dog certification of some sort, which is silly since SDs don't need to be certified anyway.

As far as I know, in every state it is illegal to bring a non SD dog into a facility that serves or sells food per FDA regulations. That does not include outdoor cafe's though; pending their allowance to such animals.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,442 Posts
There are TONS of places where you are legally allowed to bring your dogs as long as the dogs are well-behaved and you ask first (and are prepared to take no for an answer).

When we lived in northern Virginia, we would go to old town Alexandria all the time, which is an extremely dog-friendly town. Nearly all of the stores in old town allow dogs inside if they are well behaved. Many even have bowls of water outside for them. Abby has gone to two book stores, the Discovery channel store, and various other shops there. We've also had dinner together in the outdoor seating area of the Irish bar, which even has a dog menu with stuff for your pet.

We also went to Colonial Williamsburg (she was allowed in some of the stores there when we asked first, and had to wait outside at others), Leesburg, and tons of other places.

We've never done anything illegal - always asked first or called ahead to make sure it was okay, and then ensured that she was on her best behavior and no bothering any of the other customers or the staff. That's how we also found out that Borders (or was it Barnes and Noble?) allows dogs in many of its locations as long as they don't have a cafe or if the cafe is upstairs in its two-story locations!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,558 Posts
As far as I know, in every state it is illegal to bring a non SD dog into a facility that serves or sells food per FDA regulations.
And there are rules even for service dogs that are allowed into such places. The biggest one is the dog is not allowed to smell any food. Another one, which I've never seen written down but IMO is the most important, the dog is not allowed to shake in the store. You wouldn't want them to shake some hair onto food items!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,859 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Unfortunately, a lot of people abuse their priveledges or don't understand the rights that certain certifications grant them. The GCG, like stated, doesn't grant you any permission or rights, but many people think they're like a service dog certification of some sort, which is silly since SDs don't need to be certified anyway.

As far as I know, in every state it is illegal to bring a non SD dog into a facility that serves or sells food per FDA regulations. That does not include outdoor cafe's though; pending their allowance to such animals.
In a way service dogs are certified.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,558 Posts
Federal (and state) law does NOT require certification of service dogs. The only service dogs that are certified are merely certified through the individual organization that did the training. It means nothing other than the dog met the requirements at THAT organization for certification.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,250 Posts
Sometimes they should so people will know.
I think they always should, but even then, there is not a law that says you have to prove to anyone that your dog is a service dog until taken to court, so how would anyone in a store, plaza, etc. know? Anyone can buy a vest or an "official" ID tag that they sell.

I do think the ADA should somehow change or heighten their regulations though.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top