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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

My daughter and I are going camping next month and taking Maximus with us. The more I think about it, I really feel I'll need a kennel to take with me. I have two 48" kennels that fold down, but they are too big to take with us.

I was thinking of getting a new kennel to take with us camping, it will still have to be tied to the roof of the car, but think he'll need it. I don't think setting up/breaking down a campsite with a 4 month old puppy without a crate will be a lot of fun. The tie downs look too much like shoe laces :)

So what is the smallest kennel you think I can get away with, that will be usable in the future. I remember reading that if you go for IPO comp's that the dog needs to be in the kennel as well. I'm sure after this year, he won't need a kennel to go camping, just want to see if I'll have a need/use for say a 36" kennel or not down the road. If not, I'm guessing the 30" will work for us this year and I can sell it after we no longer need it.
 

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36 inch is typically enough for transport but he is old enough to start learning how to be on a tie out. I would never leave a dog unattended on a tie out but it has its places and this is one of them.
 

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In my van my GSD has a 42" kennel but when I go to flyball tournaments (once a month) I ride with a friend and he rides in a 36" as well as in a 36" during the day at the tournament.
 

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Deja rides in a 450 Furrari kennel and the others are in the 500 size Vari kennels or something similar. My aluminum Kustom Krates are 40 X 26 (actual floor space), but slightly shorter than the 500 vari kennel. They have a lot more room in the aluminum crates. Years ago I used 400 size Vari kennels because that is what fit in my Jeep. The dogs fit fine for travel and training and it wasn't like they were living in them permanently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks all. I've been thinking about the tie out, which would be perfect as I wouldn't have to lug a foldup kennel on top of the car (Nissan Altima unfortunately), but I'm just weighing if I trust Maximus enough to have free roam inside the tent at night :) Either way, I'll pick up extra patch kits for the air mattress and tent!
 

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I definitely think if you use that you need to get him used to it ASAP; there is a learning curve. And never ever leave him unsupervised on it for more than a few minutes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've actually tied his lead to a tree while I was doing yard work and he was out with me, which I'm guessing is basically the same thing, so hopefully there won't be too much of a learning curve involved.

If I go that route and do use a tie out, he would only be tied to it when I'm setting up and breaking down the camp site and within sight. Also, I would have my daughter watch him while I'm doing that.
 

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I've used tie-outs quite a bit with my dog that likes to wander and has no recall (not a GSD). I personally don't think they are the horrible thing that a lot of people make it out to be. I've mostly used tie-outs INside of a fenced area because of the dog's ability to jump over or dig under. It's another layer of safety used by a lot of people, not just people who chain their dogs to a tree 24/7. Also I use a tie-out at the cottage since there is no fence and I hate to shut the dog in the cottage all day. I have one of those red lines that looks like wire cable coated in plastic. It doesn't knot or get caught up on stuff.

The dog needs to know his radius. I think the danger with tie-outs are that dogs see something, start running, and BAM get flipped onto their back when they hit the end of the line. I bring the same line wherever we go and since my dog has used it for years now, he knows how much space he has. Even then, I always walk him around at the end of the line first so he can acclimate. My other dogs also know the radius and are familiar with the line so when they play, they never get tangled or cloths-lined by it.

Other things are just common sense....make sure the dog can't get wrapped around trees and make sure he can't climb on anything (where he could jump or fall and get strangled). Make sure the collar you are using is fitted properly and is safe for tie-out. I use a collar with a "safety ring" so hypothetically, my dog could slip out of it if he ever got hung on something.

 

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Just like Liesje said, tie-outs aren't all that bad. I stopped getting the cable style one just because Finn hit the end of one going after a tennis ball when I overthrew it by accident. It was one of the 'can hold up to 200lbs' ones and it didn't even stop him. I started buying the long leads that are made out of leash material and I've never had a problem with it. He's never out on it without me being right there with him.
 

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Another suggestion, I use the "heavy duty" style tie-out stake:


The spiral ones are a joke for any dog more than a teacup Yorkie. I don't tie-out to trees or other objects because they don't rotate. This stake allows the cable to rotate around (and also has a swivel where it snaps on).

I've never had a problem using traditional tie-out cables but I always get the strongest one available (like the ones rated for a 250lb mastiff). They have big, strong snaps on each end. But also like I said my dog doesn't challenge the tie-out and doesn't hit the end of the line. He's very leash/collar smart so when he's restrained and he knows it, he's very well behaved.
 
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