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I read on a site that a breeder has more than two dogs, more than a female and male. So, let's say a breeder is just getting started and they do the research on both male and female's pedigree, has been in the breed for a while, and fits the breeder's standard. They get their first male and female. So is that person a BYB or really doesn't fit the standard because they do not have more than one of each breeding stock? What about breeders who stick with one male and female?
 

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I am not a breeder, but I do not believe responsible breeding is black and white. I see so many "rules" that I feel don't apply in all situations.
I don't see anything wrong with having a male and female only. I would question whether the male is the best mate or not, if they are using him for convenience sake, to save on stud fees, but I don't think that necessarily makes one a bad breeder.
Just my opinion.
 

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I read on a site that a breeder has more than two dogs, more than a female and male. So, let's say a breeder is just getting started and they do the research on both male and female's pedigree, has been in the breed for a while, and fits the breeder's standard. They get their first male and female. So is that person a BYB or really doesn't fit the standard because they do not have more than one of each breeding stock? What about breeders who stick with one male and female?
The web site that posted that is making an assertion not supported by fact. It's only an opinion. Which is fine. But it's not the last word on the subject.

A person with one male and one female that meet the conditions you specified can be a breeder. The term "backyard breeder" is misleading. A person can have a back yard, be a breeder, and not just be interested in a fast buck. A sincere love of the breed, the intent to learn as much as possible, and the intent to produce puppies that advance the qualities of the chosen breed will make for a good breeder.
 

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No, but it is a yellow flag.

The reason it is, is that it is very hard to find the perfect dog for a bitch, that will be the perfect dog for that bitch for every litter. What I mean is that breeders want to maintain and improve what they are breeding. They want what they produce to be as good as, and if possible, better than what they are breeding.

To do this, you have to match male to female. You have to have a good idea of structure and be able to properly assess your bitch, and then pick a dog that complements her. If her pasterns need a little help, you want a dog with correct pasterns. If her feet are a bit spread, you want a dog with nice compact, well arched feet. If she has a color problem you want a dog with good pigment.

Yes, you can match dog and bitch, buying both after they reach two years of age. But there is no guarantee that what they produce together will be what you were hoping for. A breeder who owns just a bitch, can choose a different stud next time, and not look back. A breeder who wants to own stud and dam, well, they will probably want to try the combination again, or sell one or the other and find another perfect mating. Not easy.

Also, a breeder who is looking to the future of the breed, if they have a successful litter, a pup with all the positive characteristics of the dam but with better feet, pasterns and color for example, they will want to keep this puppy to further their program.

I think that one bitch and one dog is a start, but to be serious about breeding, one would have to keep back pups, and purchase others to accomplish their goal.

If they have no goal, they are just a byb.
 

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Many breeders start out with a bitch. The bitches are the blood and life of a kennel. A breeder can use another breeder's stud, but that's useless without quality females.
 
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