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If there is a better place for this question, someone could move it.

Ok, I really, truly, don't understand this mindset.

Why is it that some owners will take a perfectly healthy young dog, 18 months old, that is not having behavioral issues, does well with the other household dogs, and is great with the part-time kid, and neuter him, just because, she "doesn't intend to breed or show him, and wants him neutered."

This person seems to manage her critters just fine. Her other critters are altered, so it is not a boy-boy thing or the inconvenience of having both male and female dogs intact.

I guess I figure, if it isn't broke, why fix it? I can understand bitches, not everyone wants to go through 3+ weeks of bleeding, twice a year. I get that. And if some rangy, mangy border collie mix climbs your fence when you aren't right out there with your bitch, you might have mongrel pups to deal with. But why fix a dog that isn't broken? Why do people "just want him neutered."

Are preople really offended by boy-parts?

Ok, here is my issue with this: she has two young males, not just one. One was neutered younger, about 10 months old. So, now that they are both around a year and a half, isn't it possible that if you take the testosterone away from the second male, it may make the two closer in rank and more likely to spar if they get a bug up their behind? If you have three young males (1 boxer), and an older spayed bitch, and you have balance in your pack where the young boy (who is only there some week-ends), about 7, can command them all to sit and wait until he passes out the treats, do you really want to mess with that balance?

Probably, being young and full of energy, and good about training/working with the dogs, all will be ok. But I don't understand it, unless the intact male was being a jerk/bully.

BTW, when she got the second young dog, she did not have the older bitch -- that one was hers, but with her x and she didn't know she would ever have her back, but she has had her back for at least six months, maybe longer. And the boxer is her brothers, but has been there now for several weeks, so maybe it is a lot of dogs. But she handles them fine.
 

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she needs to read about neutering a dog before they have completely developed.
 

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Pet owners are constantly being bombarded with the "be a responsible owner - spay and neuter your pets" message. There are too many ignorant/stupid dog owners who either tie their dogs out to a tree or let them run loose, and then end up sitting in the Walmart parking lot with a boxful of mongrel unwanted pups to get rid of. If your friend is a responsible owner and manages her pack well, and ensures that her males cannot wander, she probably doesn't HAVE to neuter.
 

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What maxtmill said^^^ And I agree that if you have a good balance in the pack leave well enough alone!
 

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Pet owners are constantly being bombarded with the "be a responsible owner - spay and neuter your pets" message. There are too many ignorant/stupid dog owners who either tie their dogs out to a tree or let them run loose, and then end up sitting in the Walmart parking lot with a boxful of mongrel unwanted pups to get rid of. If your friend is a responsible owner and manages her pack well, and ensures that her males cannot wander, she probably doesn't HAVE to neuter.
This. Breeders can talk until they are blue in the face, show buyers the studies that back up their policies and make buyers initial the line where it says they agree not to neuter until 2 years or their warranty is void. But buyers will still listen to vets and rescues that push the "You have to neuter to be responsible" agenda, such as what happened to a Great Dane breeder a friend co-breeds with just recently. Neutered at 14 WEEKS!!!!! Violated the contract and voided the warranty less than a month and a half after they got the puppy.
 

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I don't do it. Makes them harder to manage weight wise by a good bit. Riker was neutered before I ever got a hold of him and I feed him like he was a bird and he gets out plenty tries to act like a malinois and keep up with the other two and still manages to be a tubby guy. The intact mals are muscular and trim and they eat a lot more.
 

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My dog was intact when I got him & we found out the county requires them to be neutered in order to license them. That was why we had him neutered. He was a year and a half old. He was well behaved both before & after.
 

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All of mine are fixed because I don't believe there is any reason to keep them intact. I will never keep a dog intact. There are health risks either way. I just choose to deal with the risks involved with a fixed dog versus an intact dog. This comes from working at a vet mostly and what I seen coming in on a regular basis. Across the board there were always more serious issues with intact dogs whether it was pyo or prostrate,etc. Most owners don't catch either of those in time. People on here are different and are a much smaller % of the general pet population in general(care, training, vaccinations, etc). I've done the early neutering, slightly later and the last one was 17 months or so. I did have him xrayed to make sure growth plates were closed and checked the hips. I would have waited until plates were closed if they weren't already. My dogs are all lean and muscular, quite active. I had an issue with my oldest golden--he gained a lot of weight and I realized one day he was fat. I put him on a diet and got him down to where I wanted him to be several years ago and he still weighs the same. Midnite was a big boy-weighed just over 100 pounds at one point--he now stays betwern 82-85 and that is ideal for him. Weight management isn't an issue. I definitely like Apollos personality since he was fixed. He is still very focused on me, but more easy going and not as edgy.

Maybe your friend wonders why you choose to keep yours intact? It's a personal choice and what works for one doesn't work for all.
 

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Pet owners are constantly being bombarded with the "be a responsible owner - spay and neuter your pets" message. There are too many ignorant/stupid dog owners who either tie their dogs out to a tree or let them run loose, and then end up sitting in the Walmart parking lot with a boxful of mongrel unwanted pups to get rid of. If your friend is a responsible owner and manages her pack well, and ensures that her males cannot wander, she probably doesn't HAVE to neuter.
Put me in this camp also! I thought it was the "responsible thing to do." Rocky (OS Wl GSD) was a done deal when I got him at seven months ( as a rescue) Gunther (Am Band Dawg) was a year old (I had no idea, they were going to cut his nuts off???) :eek:

And my Boxer Struddell was four before I got her fixed (Boxer's and Ace, which I told them not to use ... no problem.) The only reason it was four years was because as I said I did not want to put her under anesthesia.

But I thought it was the "responsible" thing to do?? I did not realize I had already been doing the responsible thing for four years?

So yeah I fell for it to. :eek:
 

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I don't get it either, honestly.

I'm only getting Butters fixed for two reasons: one, she is a female, making it more challenging to prevent oops litters. (something I do not feel comfortable doing for the rest of her life) and two, because we don't know her history, so health wise, getting her fixed is most likely going to end up being safer than leaving her unaltered.

Of course, I'm strongly opposed to early fixing and won't be getting her's done until she's nearly 2 years old.

But fixing a pet for no other reason that "why not?" eh.
 

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I had my guy done at 26 months .. I am moving to an area where few dogs are spayed or neutered and with my health issues I was worried a female in heat would be living in my area or be in an area where I was walking him and didn't want my guy to struggle to get to her ... worried about my ability to hold him back because of my poor balance ... it probably is stupid to think I would have a problem because he is very focused on me and great on walks but the thought of him escaping my yard was worrying me. He hasn't changed a bit .. no weight gain .. same temperament .. if it wasn't for my health issues I would have probably let him stay intact .. but in all honesty, I love him so much I might have given in to my deep wish to have another GSD just like him and studded him out for one of the pups - this solved both issues .. I hope he never has any heath issues because of my decision but it was done out of love for my best buddy.
 

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Less muss and fuss, for me getting Delgado done was not just about him but about how other dogs were reacting to him. There honestly is medical evidence both ways, and being in the rescue world you definitely see a lot more irresponsibility and health issues than the normal John Smith. I don't regret keeping Delgado intact longer than I usually did nor do I regret neutering him
 

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There honestly is medical evidence both ways, and being in the rescue world you definitely see a lot more irresponsibility and health issues than the normal John Smith. I don't regret keeping Delgado intact longer than I usually did nor do I regret neutering him
I think people involved in rescue or in the veterinary field are more likely to see the why of spay and neuter because they deal with seeing the consequences of not spaying or neutering daily(whether it's health or unwanted pregnancies)

Many years ago vets took their time and explained things to people. Now a days unless a person is educated the vet will go the easiest route. They are tired of banging their head against the wall. I explained to my vet what rehab I was giving Robyn for her FHO, because it was never recommended, she said that swimming is very good. I couldn't resist so I asked why she didn't mention it. Her answer was because people do what is minimally required, so it doesn't come up. Is that right? Probably not, but how many times do they tell people stuff and it goes in one ear and out the other? Constantly and consistently. A completely different vet pretty much told me the same thing when I came in with my FHO booklet and schedule for Brennan.

It's much easier for vets to pull it the responsible card, because it's simple and people hear that. They do not ask any questions because that would be just to difficult. It's the same with vaccinstions and obesity in pets. Vets don't say much or recommend anything because people don't listen or they get offended.
 

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When I told a friend that I was going to keep Remi intact indefinitely, he said "why torture him like that". His thinking was that the dog has urges to procreate and by getting him fixed you take those urges out. If you don't, you are torturing him with his desire being there but not being able to act on it.

Remi is still intact and will remain that way. If I have to control my urges, he has to control his :D
 

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When I told a friend that I was going to keep Remi intact indefinitely, he said "why torture him like that". His thinking was that the dog has urges to procreate and by getting him fixed you take those urges out. If you don't, you are torturing him with his desire being there but not being able to act on it.

Remi is still intact and will remain that way. If I have to control my urges, he has to control his :D
The only problem with this is that you are human your dog isn't. In males the hormones they have boils down to sex hormones. Do they need to have sex? Once the hormones do their job with assisting in growth(which I do believe is needed and I didn't necessarily believe before) What other reason do they need them for? It's just as silly as someone saying they won't fix their male because it will make him less of a man--really? It's a dog, not a man!
 

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It is pounded into peoples heads that in order to be a good pet owner they have to have their animals nuetered. I don't think I've ever seen a TV program even suggest that keeping a dog intact is a good thing it's always a negative. So people are really getting one sided info. They are told you will be responsible for all these unwanted puppies. Well. I'm sure I'm not the only one here with intact animals and have never had an accidental breeding and have dogs perfectly happy, healthy and intact.
 

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Could very well be a personal preference.. nothing more, nothing less.. Maybe they've weighed all the options and decided neutering is best for there situation, life style?

One of my males is neutered, but it was due to a health issue.. One that is very common in unaltered males... I've not noticed a change in his weight, behavior, drives, aggression, etc.. What I have noticed since his health is back up, just how crappy he was feeling, but this dog still gave me his all..

Had a female that was spayed, same with her.. no change what so ever...
 

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My older intact male recently had an injury that we were trying to diagnose. He has had an enlarged prostate,( when around bitches in heat triggers it) and sometimes it flares up causing him pain. I took him to the vet because he was clearly in distress(hunched, yelpy and wouldn't go outside or even walk unless I made him).
I was examining him at home I did compare him to my younger male for any abnormalties in the groin area and she commented that was smart as she seldom sees any males that are intact anymore.
I am glad I use a reproductive specialist regularly. The regular pet vets are all about spay/neuters. My repro vet is more about individual cases and keeping the dog intact if possible.
It ended up being a left side body injury, he either skidded on ice or was T-boned by my younger male.
 

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The only problem with this is that you are human your dog isn't. In males the hormones they have boils down to sex hormones. Do they need to have sex? Once the hormones do their job with assisting in growth(which I do believe is needed and I didn't necessarily believe before) What other reason do they need them for? It's just as silly as someone saying they won't fix their male because it will make him less of a man--really? It's a dog, not a man!
I thought the hormones continually offered benefits for structure not just for growth?
 

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If the dog is 18 months or older and they don't plan on breeding, why not neuter? What if the dog got out and impregnated some other dog? Accidents happen. Not to mention, neutering can prevent some types of cancers, so if the dog is old enough to be fully developed why shouldnt he be neutered?
 
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