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Discussion Starter #1
In my search for a german shepherd puppy (working line) I found that breeders can typically offer a) FULL Registration, b) Limited Registration only, and/or c) your choice of Full or Limited with different prices/fees.

It appears to me that some breeders are more protective of their bloodlines and tend to offer only limited registration, also can reject potential buyers if they are breeders or own a kennel. well, it makes sense. However, I do have several questions about the Pros - and Cons of Limited versus Full Registration, if limited have any advantage at all, why I will want to buy a dog with limited rights?

It appears that granting Full registration for the previously given "limited registration" will depend on the 24-month evaluation of hip, health, etc, and whether the dog earned some titles? So why some kennels offer full registration, if you will assume they want also you to train the dog and get the dog to pass the health exams? Due to the genetic background and medical history of their dog, are they confident the dog will not develop any health problems like myelopathy or hip dysplasia?

Do the dog needs to actually earn a title, or if he competes or consistently train to compete will qualify the dog to get the full registration. As by the narrative on those websites, it appears that this is more at the criteria of the breeder/seller, so they can always refuse to change the registration to Full.

If I want a dog for a family companion, but I am willing to train the dog and follow with some of these sports, it is worthy to get a puppy with limited registration, or should I only look at dogs with full registration.

If you buy a puppy with limited registration limit your ability to breed this dog. But ... does it means that you can't breed absolutely? or you can breed but you will be unable to register the new puppies?
Let's say hypothetically for example, that you breed your limited-registered female with a full-registered sire. What about if the new puppies pass the health test at 24 months and train to compete and turn out outstanding winners? Can they still qualify to be registered?

Who regulates all these laws and policies above?

Any lights in this confusion will be greatly appreciated,

Thank you in advance
 

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It's really pretty clear on the AKC website:

"Limited Registration means that the dog is registered but no litters produced by that dog are eligible for registration."
 

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It really varies by breeder and situation. Dogs who are going to be shown must have full registration and be intact to compete. Many breeders as such will sell these dogs in co-owns in order to help maintain their line and continue breeding the winning dogs they produce.

In working lines selling dogs on limited and switching to full after meeting the breeders requirements helps protect the breed and person's breeding reputation and helps prevent poor examples of the breed from being bred.

Breeding dogs on limited registration is a huge no go. People who are doing it are often breaking the contract they had with their breeder and as such are being dishonest and generally only in it to make money/fulfill selfish desires. Dogs on limited registration should not be being bred. AKC registers the dogs, the breeders are the one who handle the type of paperwork for registration the buyer gets.

There is really no real reason to have a dog on full registration if you aren't planning to breed it or show it. If you are planning on breeding the dog then there should be zero issue purchasing on limited and moving to full once the dog has proven breed worthy.

If you just want a family companion and don't plan on being a responsible breeder then there's nothing wrong with limited registration. It won't impact anything in your life with your dog.

I've noticed a lot of the breeders I've seen in GSDs that will give you full registration on a puppy if you pay more outright are often not very reputable. A lot of the reptuable breeders will only give full with the passing of the requirements and/or if they know and trust you. I'm sure there's a lot of variation in this as I don't know every breeder, but it's something I've noticed while looking for breeders.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you so much for the clarification.

What I find difficult to understand was still many breeders still will give you Full on the go when granting Limited registrations seems to be the more common-sense approach overall.
 

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I have one dog I bought with full registration, no written guarantee. One I have on limited registration with stipulations for attaining full.

Here is how I look at guarantees and registrations

1. I don't care about a guarantee. Once I buy a dog, it's mine. I'm not giving it back. And if there is a genetic issue then I'm not going to want a replacement. Buy health insurance.
2. Full registration is only in play if you plan on breeding the dog. Any breeder that sells on limited has stipulations on how to attain full registration which included titling the dog. If the dog is not titled, or is not a working dog that has proven they are breed worthy, then you shouldn't be breeding anyways.

So just find the dog you want and the breeder you trust.
 

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It really is up to the breeder as to what they want to offer. I personally sell all my puppies on AKC Limited Registration. Will that stop someone from breeding, no, but now I have added a $10,000.00 penalty for breeding with limited registration, so hopefully that will deter anyone even thinking about it. The whole reason breeders sell on limited versus full, is that the individual pup should prove themselves breed worthy, by passing official health clearances and earning a title of some sort, more that just a CGC (which any dog should be able to pass). The breeder has done everything they can to breed and raise a good quality puppy to that point, now it's up to the owner to follow through. Once you meet those requirements, I will gladly sign over to full papers at no additional charge. That is three fold, as it protects my reputation, it protects the puppy, and it protects the breed itself. Bottom line, if you are wanting a companion, then breeding rights isn't even an issue. If you want to train, title and compete, then the breeder is going to be willing to sign off to full rights after the buyer has met the requirements.
 
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