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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi guys, I have a puppy that is very scared from other dogs (any size). He's so scared that he try to bite the other dog, he pisses while trying to escape, he " scream " and sometimes if he can't escape he sleeps on he's back. he is now 9 weeks old. What should I do?

He's not afraid from people, cars, sounds, .... only from dog's ( even the mirror !)

I forgot to mention that the other dogs where not agressive ,
 

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He needs to be socialized, socialized Socialized, SOCIALIZED... with lots of dogs and people and sounds ect... up until they are about 6/7 they need to be heavily socialized to have a well balanced dog and prevent aggression... try getting him into a puppy class this will help with socializing him, if he is scared back him away and wait for him to calm down then try slowly approaching...

My girl is 7 months and was the same way as your pup at that age and she is fine now. Best of luck
 

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the breeder told me that he never had that problem before. The parents are brave and they are never afraid. " that's what he said" I don'think that yhe breeder is honest.
 

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At 9 weeks, a pup has maybe had his second set of shots. Meeting other pups (who are confirmed for at least 2nd set as well) should be in controlled play groups not dogs in general public.

Without knowing the complete circumstances with your pups reactions, it sounds like he is being overwhelmed. Especially at this age, it is crucial that all of his experiences be good. If this was my pup, I would back way up, locate a very experienced trainer with a puppy group ASAP, explain the reactions you have already seen, and begin the socialization within that group. I would do this today. Once he has had his third set, and he has gained some confidence in the play group, you can introduce him to calm dogs/pups, one then maybe 2 at a time. Avoid dog parks.
 

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give the dog a break. At 9 weeks you have only had him one week so he is not even secure in his surroundings , stressed from leaving home, change of food, water, after effects of recent "processing" which includes worming and vaccinations. He feels vulnerable because he is vulnerable.
There is no need for him to have this kind of exposure. He is scared to death , wants to avoid and can't so he is already put into fight. The stress is going to affect his body - possibly a depress of the immune which may bring demodex . You are not making a good association with other dogs and may end with big problems later on.

If you can go back to the breeder with your pup and have him socialize with any of is remaining littermates , or his dam.

Now if he were with his littermates and dam and a strange dog came into the picture , what do you think would happen?
That mother-dog would show her ferocity in defense of her babies and drive that strange dog into the next province.
She would not welcome the dog to put her young at risk.
 

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Were the other dogs interested in yours, being friendly and sniffing?

Shadow would scream in terror if other dogs were 'aggressively' friendly (excited about meeting other dogs and making friends) when she was little while taking her puppy obedience classes and would behave like she got touched by acid if another dog made any physical contact. She grew out of it, but still isn't very interested in other dogs running up to her. We have another resident dog that she's always been very playful with, though, which probably helped.

Avoid dog parks, it'll freak yours out probably. If there are other dogs in the neighborhood that are behind fences you could stroll by to get yours used to the presence of other dogs without them being close by, or if you know of a dog that is very laid back yours might be able to make the first friendly steps whenever he's interested.
 

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Forget about the other dogs, she doesn't need to be around them right now. Just trusted dogs and even that is supervised and not a free for all. You have a baby, literally. Be a strong & fair leader, bond with this pup. Build her confidence. Start short training sessions, let her follow you around the house while getting chores done, bring her with you when you run errands, explore the yard together, have her climb over & under yard chairs, etc. Encourage & praise her.
 

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Had same problem with my Zeus...

...and was going to add something to this thread. But the last four posts say it all...but for one thing...

YOU MUST BE THE PACK LEADER AND NOT TOLERATE ANY OTHER DOG ATTACKING YOUR BABY. Be overt. Be aggressive. Take decisive action if the puppy is threatened. Do harm, as needed.

DEFEND HIM.

You simply won't believe the loving and trusting reaction from your dog that will result from you defending your baby puppy from all comers.

LF
 

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Forget about the other dogs, she doesn't need to be around them right now. Just trusted dogs and even that is supervised and not a free for all. You have a baby, literally. Be a strong & fair leader, bond with this pup. Build her confidence. Start short training sessions, let her follow you around the house while getting chores done, bring her with you when you run errands, explore the yard together, have her climb over & under yard chairs, etc. Encourage & praise her.
THIS.

If you watch good older dogs around a pup in their pack they will show you how to raise a confident pup. They tolerate all kinds of nonsense from the baby, let him "attack" them and chew on them (within reason), climb on them and so on. But they do NOT allow a strange dog to scare the baby. The point is to build the pup's confidence and make him secure in the pack. As owners WE take on that role.

Protect and be loving and tolerant of your puppy because someday he is going to weigh 80+ pounds, have big, white fangs, and you want him to have your back.
 

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Forget about the other dogs, she doesn't need to be around them right now. Just trusted dogs and even that is supervised and not a free for all. You have a baby, literally. Be a strong & fair leader, bond with this pup. Build her confidence. Start short training sessions, let her follow you around the house while getting chores done, bring her with you when you run errands, explore the yard together, have her climb over & under yard chairs, etc. Encourage & praise her.
Agreed. Dogs don't need other dogs, they have you. Make sure you don't get her out of her comfort zone. Don't force her to like other dogs. When she's older she will probably get better, but for now, you are her best friend and protector.

Every day people walk their dogs past my house who are terrified of my dogs. These poor little dogs bark and shy from my house, yet the owners drag them past my house every day. they don't get it. I don't get it!

And to be fair, when I see these scared dogs coming, I move my dogs inside for a while. But I don't always see them in time.
 

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Kingo.

Carmspack is spot on. Develop your own relationship w the pup first - not that you aren't, but introduction w other dogs, right now, is premature. Let her observe your confidence and relaxation in any situation and she will soon follow.

I've iintroduced two pups into my own household of multiple German Shepherds on different occasions and have had complete acceptance within two days - but those are with mature, well balanced adults, already under my direction. I have a 5 month old male GSD who we brought home at 12 weeks. He was moved in with two four year old female GSD's. The first day was interesting, but by day three - the sisters understood he was here to stay and he understood he was accepted, but there would be boundaries.

Having other dogs in your household can help build confidence quickly, so long as you lead the process. If she is a single dog, provide her with love, structure and exercise for now. Consider external dog interactions in a couple of months. She'll be fine. Best of luck.
 

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I had a puppy at about 10 weeks or so develop fear of little yippy barking dogs that lived next door he never even really saw, so much so that he didn't even want to leave the house or yard in that direction. He had been to puppy socialization classes and showed no fear with my other older dogs. It just seemed to be little yippy barking dogs in the distance that really did him in. It was compounded by loose packs of little yippers that roam around here. Gangs of them.

I did something perhaps a little controversial.

I took him out and we set out looking for the little roving packs and at first he was scared it took lots of cajoling and a little bit of dragging but we finally found a pack of them and when they confronted us in the street I proceeded to chase those little guys with my puppy in tow. The yippers ran in terror and the puppy upon seeing this shed all his fear very quickly.

What would have happened if they came after him? They'd have been punted. Loose hostile dogs on a public street are fair game IMO. It accomplished a few things. 1. He trusts that I will have his back and defend him. 2. He gets to see their barking is pretty much for show.

Fast forward a few weeks later and if he spots one that isn't confronting us and tries to give chase I just give a gentle correction and we go on about our business. Fear is gone, respect for me as his protector goes up, he doesn't bark or attempt to chase other dogs, problem solved.


Your puppy's issue is not genetic if it was he would show fear towards his environment and people. It is a confidence and trust issue.
 
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