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I’ve been trying to teach my 17wk old German Australian Shepherd Puppy recall and researched online and it suggests having him on a leash asking him to come and running away as soon as he reacts and when he does run with me he always jumps on me and tries to herd me where ever he wants to go and also when we are just going on runs not even in training I was wondering if anyone has any ideas on how to fix this vice/issue?
 

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I'm having this problem to and it usually results into a challenge of my authority to where I have to Alpha her so I'm interested in feedback as well.


She isn't normally like this so it just seems to come out of the blue. If we're inside, the only thing that usually calms her down is picking her up and bringing her to the kitchen where I have a baby gate I can give her a time out. But outside it usually results in me having to physically pin her and do the alpha stare. Both these methods are quickly going to become difficult as she grows. I'm hoping it's just puppy behavior that will pass because she is normally extremely obedient and responsive to commands.
 

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As for the jumping, it helps to put your foot/leg out and use whatever command you use for no. I just pull my knee up to my stomach which prevents him from actually jumping all the way up. This video might help:
 

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The method you're describing, calling your puppy and running the other way, is typically only used to entice them to come when there is something very interesting or exciting to the puppy, from my understanding. And often running away can tip the scale and get the puppy to recall when they may not otherwise.

But you don't NEED to do that to teach recall, and the reactions you both are describing proves that for a puppy with strong herding or prey drive it might not be the best approach! Your running gets the puppy all excited, then you punish them for being excited...leaving your puppy confused!

Recall is such a fundamental part of living with a puppy, that you seldom have to work too hard at it IMO. Just make it ALWAYS worth the puppy's effort when he complies. Call the puppy to eat, call the puppy to go outside and play, call the puppy to come and get a treat, etc. Teaching a puppy that recall is not optional is a little tougher...but you're not there yet.

Dutchy, please stop alpha rolling your puppy! He's not learning what you're hoping he is when you do that, and it will likely cause more behavioral issues for you in the future! To stop your puppy from engaging in an unwanted activity just square your body to them and tell them firmly. If that doesn't seem to work slowly start invading their space. It's not a threatening gesture, just an "I'm serious" one. When they comply immediately soften you posture and back off a bit.

Puppies tend to jump and mouth things when they get excited. The best way I've found to get them to stop is to teach them other things, like sit. Teach the puppy that running up to you and sitting gets the attention and treats he's after. Jumping and mouthing are gently discouraged or ignored. It usually doesn't take them long to understand.
 

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with my big-boy, when he was a little pup, if he jumped up I moved forward. I walked into his space so that he had to back up. Once his little bottom hit the ground in a sit, I'd make my body all soft and back up a step and tell him that he was a good boy. This worked with my boy because he is super confident. If you have a "soft" dog this might not be the best approach. With my gal-dog I did what Tim suggested. I simply told her to sit. Once her bottom hit the ground we'd move off on a little jog side by side. The herding instinct is strong in her. She carries something in her mouth to help with the urge to nip. In her case it is often a pine-cone.

disclaimer: when my husband comes home from work she will leap straight up, all 4 feet off of the ground, to give my hubby's nose a lick. One leap and she is satisfied keeping "4 on the floor".
 

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I'm having this problem to and it usually results into a challenge of my authority to where I have to Alpha her so I'm interested in feedback as well.


She isn't normally like this so it just seems to come out of the blue. If we're inside, the only thing that usually calms her down is picking her up and bringing her to the kitchen where I have a baby gate I can give her a time out. But outside it usually results in me having to physically pin her and do the alpha stare. Both these methods are quickly going to become difficult as she grows. I'm hoping it's just puppy behavior that will pass because she is normally extremely obedient and responsive to commands.
Please stop doing this. In fact, start another thread so this one doesn't get derailed.

The whole Alpha theory with all that dominance crap and pinning and rolling has long ago been debunked BY THE GUY WHO DEVELOPED IT TO BEGIN WITH.

The only thing you will do is ruin your relationship, break the dogs spirit or end up in the ER when your dog is big enough to fight back.
 

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I'm having this problem to and it usually results into a challenge of my authority to where I have to Alpha her so I'm interested in feedback as well.


She isn't normally like this so it just seems to come out of the blue. If we're inside, the only thing that usually calms her down is picking her up and bringing her to the kitchen where I have a baby gate I can give her a time out. But outside it usually results in me having to physically pin her and do the alpha stare. Both these methods are quickly going to become difficult as she grows. I'm hoping it's just puppy behavior that will pass because she is normally extremely obedient and responsive to commands.
Please STOP doing that! You risk RUINING your relationship with this puppy!! It's not necessary, based on wrong-headed thinking, and will serve no good purpose other than teaching the pup that you cannot be trusted. I can't imagine that you want that.

Tim has very good advice. Ditch the alpha nonsense and try what he recommends. If, after a full hearted effort, it doesn't work, come back and we'll be happy to offer more suggestions.

Aly

ETA: Just read a couple of more posts. I'm sorry if it feels like we're piling on, but too many of us have seen what happens when folks traumatize a puppy like this. There's a better, more productive way to teach a puppy manners and build a good relationship, at the same time. This ain't it.
 

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I taught recall with a long line and bowl of food. A retractable leash seems to work best but I wasn't going to buy one just for this.

Sit in a chair. Toss a piece of food to get the puppy to run to it. Don't throw it far at first because he doesn't understand the game and he needs to be able to see you throw it nd where the food is. call your puppy back and feed one piece at a time but in rapid succession. throw another piece. Call back. Feed.

If you use a clicker, you can click as soon a the puppy starts to come back to you so he knows he's doing right. If not, no big deal. he'll figure it out when he gets rewarded.
 

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when he does run with me he always jumps on me and tries to herd me where ever he wants to go and also when we are just going on runs
Do I understand this correctly? You are taking your puppy on runs with you? If so, please stop doing this. You can permanently damage a young dog's joints and tendons by running with them.

It's fine to play with your pup and run around the yard, but the puppy has to be allowed to stop when he is tired. Encouraging a puppy to run any distance can do serious damage from which he may never recover.

Young dogs should not go on runs until they stop growing and developing. For German Shepherds this is usually around 2 years old. I'm not familiar with your dog's breed so I can't say when their joints stop developing. But 17 weeks is definitely too young.
 

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I read Patricia McConnell's book (Other End of the Leash) and it suggests that to teach recall, you can walk away while looking over your shoulder (if you need a little extra body language to strengthen recall). This is how my dog "speaks" to me and asks me to follow him. When I do it to him, it works quite well to give him the same message - 'follow me' or 'come along'. Running away may just be too exciting!

I also disagree that there is any dominance involved! My first dog (when a puppy) used to leap on me all the time when I was running. The next moment, she would roll over and ask me to rub her belly. It really was just Play and energy and high spirits. She just has to be taught to contain herself and not leap up on you, and to come when called (several training methods suggested here!)
 
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