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Discussion Starter #1
never breakfast or lunch - just dinner.

I'm currently giving him 1 c in the AM, 1c at noon and 2 c at dinner.

I split the 2c at dinner time and gave it to him separately as I was thinking he was eating too fast and then subsequently throwing it up. That worked for a few days but last night he still threw up.

I'm leaning towards that he's eating too fast as he hasnt thrown up breakfast or lunch ever. Any suggestions on how to slow him down or what is causing this?

Thanks!
 

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Is he actually vomiting? Forceful stomach contractions, along with gagging and heaving.

Or is he regurgitating? A more passive act of expelling contents from the esophagus. It can look very similiar to vomiting but regurgitiation is usually more passive and not as violent. A lot of times it it is just a gag, a heave then open mouth, and spill out contents.

Is there any yellow fluid found in the contents? Does the food look broken down or just soggy? Of course that wouldn't apply to canned food if you are feeding that instead of dry.

Knowing which one it is helps to define whether the problem is coming from the stomach or the esophagus.
 

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If it is because he's eating too fast and you just want to slow him down, then there are a couple of things you might try:

put the kibble in something like a bundt pan, or put a large obstacle like an upturned coffee mug in the middle of his bowl---both will require him to pick out the kibble pieces a few at a time instead of wolfing down mouthfuls.

or spread the kibble out in a thin layer on a cookie sheet--he'll have to eat them piece by piece rather than grab a mouthful.
 

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Why not give him 1 1/2 cups for breakfast, 1 1/2 cups for lunch and ONE cup for dinner? Same amount in same time period.

Does it help if you add water to the food? Alot of water? I know that slows Bretta down. Also the bundt pan or add a huge rock (too large to swallow, I mean a large rock) to the bowl helps alot of dogs.
 

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Lisa,

He's reguritating - Its basically passive, whole nuggets of food coming up with just clear fluid and soggy food.

He's 4 1/2 months old - the breeder told us he was one of, if not the smallest in the litter. He's very food motivated and starts to panic if it gets past meal time.
 

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When he is eating at dinner - is there more people around,too much food, more noise, rushed feeling? Maybe he is feeling like he has to hurry - maybe changing his time of dinner or a relaxing walk. I find if I feed my dog when I am getting dinner ready, she feels the rushing around - so I feed her when we are sitting down or after - put her in an open top crate so no table begging. Less stress on me too, not having to watch that she isn't eating too fast.

Good luck & let everyone know how you are doing - may want to speak to your vet - if all fails.
 

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Originally Posted By: ClareLisa,

He's reguritating - Its basically passive, whole nuggets of food coming up with just clear fluid and soggy food.

He's 4 1/2 months old - the breeder told us he was one of, if not the smallest in the litter. He's very food motivated and starts to panic if it gets past meal time.
Ouch!

Ok, I don't want to go overboard because it's only a small chance, but if it continues after you slow down his feeding and especially if he has trouble gaining weight, I would definately let the vet do a barium x-ray on the esophagus to rule out any strictures or Megaesophagus.

Remember I may just be jumping the gun so don't panic. LOL!

It is rare disorder, but at the same time quite common in our breed.

Watch him closely though!
 

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I think I would also get a barium test done just to rule out megaesophagus. It's better to know. The test is way easy for the dog! All your pup does is eat food covered in barium and then gets an xray to see where the food is in the pup. And if it's all in the stomach, no mega. If it's still in the esophagus, or there is pouching, then you will know more.

Mega can be managed and our dogs can do well. I say that cause I have a hale and happy NINE year old GSD that's always been healthy and well. But you need to get a handle on the regurgitation because your main concern the first year is aspiration pneumonia and that happens from food coming up and then getting into the lungs when they take a breath.

http://www.thepetcenter.com/xra/xraycases.htm#Hip%20Dysplasia and scroll down to Esophageal Achalasia to see the xrays.

http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00133.htm has info and it IS GENETIC so you have to tell the breeder and they should not do a repeat breeding.

http://www.videxgsd.co.uk/gastrointestinal.htm

And here's my Elsa, remember she's now 9 and still doing great! http://www.4gsd.net/agility.html
 

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Originally Posted By: MaggieRoseLee

Mega can be managed and our dogs can do well. I say that cause I have a hale and happy NINE year old GSD that's always been healthy and well. But you need to get a handle on the regurgitation because your main concern the first year is aspiration pneumonia and that happens from food coming up and then getting into the lungs when they take a breath.
Absolutely! Not to mention it is VERY important to catch this early and with proper feeding techniques you have a better chance of minimizing further stretching of the esophagus and in some cases it will reverse completely.

I was not so lucky with my Mega rescue dog as her previous owners didn't manage her condition, so her esophagus is beyond what even a normal Mega dogs is. Even she is still doing ok, but possibly could have been a lot better had she been diagnosed as a puppy!

Let's hope that's not it. However, it is the number one cause of regurgitation in dogs so if this has been going on awhile I would do the barium. It's very easy like MaggieRoseLee stated!
 

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I only have a question, no comment. I've only had one experience dealing with mega-E, late onset aquired mega-E, so have no true experience with "normal" mega-E. But wouldn't mega-E, regurgetating, show up after every meal, not just after supper, or does the amount of each meal play a part in it?
 

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Originally Posted By: ArycrestI only have a question, no comment. I've only had one experience dealing with mega-E, late onset aquired mega-E, so have no true experience with "normal" mega-E. But wouldn't mega-E, regurgetating, show up after every meal, not just after supper, or does the amount of each meal play a part in it?
No it doesn't. A regurg can happen at anytime. Sometimes they won't regurg all day or even all week. It all depends on if the food makes it down to the stomach that time or sometimes the esophagus is just packing it in for the "motherload" regurg later on.


Sometimes MegaE is not even diagnosed because of regurging, but rather aspiration pneumonia.
 

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Originally Posted By: mamagoose No it doesn't. A regurg can happen at anytime. Sometimes they won't regurg all day or even all week. It all depends on if the food makes it down to the stomach that time or sometimes the esophagus is just packing it in for the "motherload" regurg later on.


Sometimes MegaE is not even diagnosed because of regurging, but rather aspiration pneumonia.
Thanks for the explanation. That's the experience I had with Yukon (he was fighting polymyositis and mega-E can be one of the side effects of the disease). Despite giving him small, "slurry" type meals spread out during the day, he would regurgatate anytime, and he often got aspiration pneumonia.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
so far we've had no issues with gaining weight - he's growing by leaps and bounds and definitely does not seem skinny at all. It seems to happen when there is a fluery of activity - new people, dying to go outside and play...

I am going to try the slowing down suggestions - we have a vet appt next Friday for the last of the puppy shots so I will ask about mega e then.

thanks!
 

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Originally Posted By: Clare

I am going to try the slowing down suggestions - we have a vet appt next Friday for the last of the puppy shots so I will ask about mega e then.

thanks!
It might be helpful to keep a journal. That way you can log when you fed him, if he regurged, if you thought he ate too fast, and any activites that went on during or after that time. Write down every detail no matter how insignificant you might think it is. Then take a look back and see if there is a common denominator.

I have done this with one of my dogs and it has really helped. I could see it helping in your case too.
 

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Ha! I journal my food - why not his?

Excellent idea because it may bring to light a pattern... Thanks again!
 

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My foster ate way to fast. In order to slow him down I put his kibble on a cookie sheet to spread it out. It helped alot.
 

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clare, I'd really ask and push for the barium test. My Elsa almost NEVER regurgitated, but she has it. She was also always a normal weight. And I'd much rather have the test and it be negative, then continue to worry.

And if it is positive, then there are tons of management things you can do to prevent the sometimes fatal aspriration pnuemonia and other problems. AS WELL AS TELLING YOUR BREEDER!

One of the reasons this condition is WAY more common in the breed than we hear about is because of dogs like my Elsa (and maybe yours). They seem fairly normal and can grow up fine. But they can still have the genetics for it and pass it on if they are bred. And some puppies can be so afflicted they never can even keep their mom's milk down and die either at a few weeks old or a few months old.

So it's not just for you but the breeder. Hey, maybe you can get the breeder to chip in and help with the cost of the barium test?
 

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Originally Posted By: Luca_stlIf it is because he's eating too fast and you just want to slow him down, then there are a couple of things you might try:

put the kibble in something like a bundt pan, or put a large obstacle like an upturned coffee mug in the middle of his bowl---both will require him to pick out the kibble pieces a few at a time instead of wolfing down mouthfuls.
This has worked WONDERS!!!!!

Thank you!
 
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