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I got my puppy when he was about 7 weeks old (he's now about 9 weeks old), and we've been working on all the general training like house and crate training, however I've run into a specific problem that I'm not sure what to do about. When he rests in his crate then wakes up, I get him out and carry him outside to the bathroom zone and when he's done I pick him up and carry him back in. I'll either put him down once we walk up the stairs so he can run around and play for a few minutes or right back to his crate depending on what we're going to do.

This was all well and good until about 5 days ago. Lately when we come upon any of those places, he'll start squirming, struggling and squealing in my arms to be let down. I've tried to wait it out but he usually squirms harder and tries to spring off of me with his back legs. Today I waited it out and it took him about a whole minute until he tired himself out and I praised him and put him down quickly so he couldn't start struggling again when I moved. I'm not sure "waiting it out" is the appropriate thing to do in this case, and I'm looking for some guidance on what to do... I won't be carrying him around forever but I don't want him to learn to be overly excited and squirm around to get away from me. Any advice is appreciated, thanks!
 

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Keep doing what you did; waiting him out. He will learn that calm behavior gets him what he wants. Make sure to wait until two seconds of calm at least so he really will learn what calm means. Also I would pick him up on other times like before feeding him. It will help with teaching impulse control. Roll up your sleeves so that you will always stay on top of this little guy. He may be a pup that can take advantage of training inconsistencies.
 

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Is there a reason why you don't walk him to the door and to his bathroom zone (on leash)?

I got my puppy when he was about 7 weeks old (he's now about 9 weeks old), and we've been working on all the general training like house and crate training, however I've run into a specific problem that I'm not sure what to do about. When he rests in his crate then wakes up, I get him out and carry him outside to the bathroom zone and when he's done I pick him up and carry him back in. I'll either put him down once we walk up the stairs so he can run around and play for a few minutes or right back to his crate depending on what we're going to do.

This was all well and good until about 5 days ago. Lately when we come upon any of those places, he'll start squirming, struggling and squealing in my arms to be let down. I've tried to wait it out but he usually squirms harder and tries to spring off of me with his back legs. Today I waited it out and it took him about a whole minute until he tired himself out and I praised him and put him down quickly so he couldn't start struggling again when I moved. I'm not sure "waiting it out" is the appropriate thing to do in this case, and I'm looking for some guidance on what to do... I won't be carrying him around forever but I don't want him to learn to be overly excited and squirm around to get away from me. Any advice is appreciated, thanks!
 

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Keep doing what you did; waiting him out. He will learn that calm behavior gets him what he wants. Make sure to wait until two seconds of calm at least so he really will learn what calm means. Also I would pick him up on other times like before feeding him. It will help with teaching impulse control. Roll up your sleeves so that you will always stay on top of this little guy. He may be a pup that can take advantage of training inconsistencies.
For feeding time I've been making him sit and wait for me to put his food in his crate and then I give him the signal "OK!". The same with coming out of his crate. He's caught on to those pretty fast!

Is there a reason why you don't walk him to the door and to his bathroom zone (on leash)?
Well everything I've referenced told me to pick them up and carry them right where you want them to go. There's also another dog in the house which would be a huge distraction for him if she decided to run up to try to play. Lastly there's some stairs right before the door where I would be picking him up anyway.
 

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Might be time to let him walk on a leash.
Walk briskly and with purpose. If he gets distracted, keep walking and say, “ We’re going outside,” or whatever you use as marker for bathroom.
Pups get to the point where they hate being picked up, and most of us can’t pick them up when they get full size anyway, so you might as well just let him go to the spot on his own. A couple of stairs should be fine, he needs to learn to navigate them.
 

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Might be time to let him walk on a leash.
Walk briskly and with purpose. If he gets distracted, keep walking and say, “ We’re going outside,” or whatever you use as marker for bathroom.
Pups get to the point where they hate being picked up, and most of us can’t pick them up when they get full size anyway, so you might as well just let him go to the spot on his own. A couple of stairs should be fine, he needs to learn to navigate them.
I agree but he needs to learn to be picked up and remain calm. Even as an adult there may be a time when someone needs to pick him up.
 

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Dumb question but do you know the correct way to pick a puppy up, you don't really say much about it.
 

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I agree but he needs to learn to be picked up and remain calm. Even as an adult there may be a time when someone needs to pick him up.
I don’t know. I half agree with this. Archer hated being picked up as a baby and would kick, scream, and try to get down. It wasn’t necessary for me to pick him up, so I simply stopped. Now as a 75lb dog, I can pick him up whenever I want, and he has zero issues. Stays absolutely still. I never practiced it with him. What I did do was build a super strong bond and create trust. He didn’t trust me enough yet as a tiny baby, and I believe that forcing him to shut down when he’s scared and uncomfortable would have made it worse, not better. He trusts me now, and I can handle him in any way that I want because he knows I won’t hurt him.
 

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Dumb question but do you know the correct way to pick a puppy up, you don't really say much about it.
I pick him up with my hand under his rib cage and carry him so he is between my arm and my chest and support his back legs with my other hand (hard to explain in text). He isn't uncomfortable but when he realizes where I've taken him, he decides that he wants down right that second!
 

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I don’t know. I half agree with this. Archer hated being picked up as a baby and would kick, scream, and try to get down. It wasn’t necessary for me to pick him up, so I simply stopped. Now as a 75lb dog, I can pick him up whenever I want, and he has zero issues. Stays absolutely still. I never practiced it with him. What I did do was build a super strong bond and create trust. He didn’t trust me enough yet as a tiny baby, and I believe that forcing him to shut down when he’s scared and uncomfortable would have made it worse, not better. He trusts me now, and I can handle him in any way that I want because he knows I won’t hurt him.
My pup isn't scared, he just gets really anxious when he knows where we are. He's fine up until we get there and as soon as I put him down it's business as usual.
 

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My pup isn't scared, he just gets really anxious when he knows where we are. He's fine up until we get there and as soon as I put him down it's business as usual.
Okay, that just reinforces what I’m trying to say. If he’s not uncomfortable with being picked up, it’s unnecessary to do it. Since he isn’t uncomfortable with it now, you shouldn’t have any issues picking him up if you have to when he’s older. I’d still rather my dog saw something as a positive thing instead of simply shutting down because he was overpowered. To each their own.
 

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I agree that a dog should be able to be picked up. But he’s giving you signs that you might want to listen to.

I might suggest that you do some training sessions where you solely work on picking him up, not bringing him anywhere and work with little distractions around. Just a quick pick up or lift and then happy rewards.
I would definitely want picking up or carrying to be linked with happy thoughts for my dog.
 

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I agree with Pytheis, but if you insist on picking him up, maybe have a little bit of string cheese in your hand to feed him when you pick him up, and save it only for that occasion. String cheese works wonders over here.
Hats off to those who can pick up their GSDs. I can no longer do that.
 

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I got my puppy when he was about 7 weeks old (he's now about 9 weeks old), and we've been working on all the general training like house and crate training, however I've run into a specific problem that I'm not sure what to do about. When he rests in his crate then wakes up, I get him out and carry him outside to the bathroom zone and when he's done I pick him up and carry him back in. I'll either put him down once we walk up the stairs so he can run around and play for a few minutes or right back to his crate depending on what we're going to do.

This was all well and good until about 5 days ago. Lately when we come upon any of those places, he'll start squirming, struggling and squealing in my arms to be let down. I've tried to wait it out but he usually squirms harder and tries to spring off of me with his back legs. Today I waited it out and it took him about a whole minute until he tired himself out and I praised him and put him down quickly so he couldn't start struggling again when I moved. I'm not sure "waiting it out" is the appropriate thing to do in this case, and I'm looking for some guidance on what to do... I won't be carrying him around forever but I don't want him to learn to be overly excited and squirm around to get away from me. Any advice is appreciated, thanks!
my new puppy is a squirmer also and a diva-if she dont get her way she has a hissy fit.
 

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I only really carried my pup down the wood steps and the concrete yard steps at that age. Then, after that, not for long. I did work on him tolerating being picked up. But not for bathroom/backdoor transport. It was more important to me to teach him the route and the process of getting to the backdoor by his own steam and will. I too have another dog. One thing that has always helped us with leaving crates/distractibilty/excitabilty was having a prize to carry proudly. Id let him out give him his tug and he would parade to the steps, get carried down, then parade top the back door, get carried down those steps then placed down to go find a spot to pee. He would squirm, Id just ignore it. We worked on being held during near daily weigh ins, paw wiping, etc

I allowed him to start going down the steps I guess at about 10 or 11 weeks.

Not saying you are doing wrong, just sharing other ideas in case the juice is no longer worth the squeeze with the carrying struggle.
 

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When I got my boy at 8 weeks, as soon as we wake up in the morning I carry him down the stairs and outside to do his business,,Same spot every time, he would come in and walk on his own,,they dont seem to like to be held for very long,they get squirmish,,Id say by the 11th week, hed go down the stairs on his own and go out,first few times had an accident before he went out,,Hasnt been a problem since,he;s now 16 weeks,.
 

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My puppy went through this... what worked for me was to put her down as soon as she started struggling so she got the idea that as soon as she wants down, she just has to let me know and she’ll be safely lowered to the floor... then when she calmed down I picked her back up and kept going. This is one of those rare situations where if they feel slightly unsafe, their instincts are right because if they start to panic, you’ll drop them and they’ll be hurt... it’s not like being afraid of a leaf or a vacuum when force them into it and exposure will cure them of their irrational fear. She has to learn to trust you and you carrying her will not result in her hitting the ground.
 
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