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Discussion Starter #1
We’ve been working on corrections with Tito with a prong collar, as we’ve been doing for a while now. Today he was going after a towel that had fallen that I wanted him to leave alone. I popped the collar while saying no and he turned around and went to snap at me, or so I assume. I wasn’t low to the ground but he turned and snapped and could’ve gotten my leg. Not sure if that means the pops we too forceful or if it’s just because he was in a playful mood, but I’m hoping to correct my corrections if need be. Thanks in advance!
 

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How old is Tito? Have you taught him positive and negative markers?
 

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There is a game called It’s Yer Choice that you can find on YouTube. That’s what I would work on. Teach him a leave it command instead of correcting him for something he likely doesn’t know is wrong. I’m not anti-prong collar, but there are far better ways to teach things than using a prong on a young puppy.
 

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What GypsyGhost said.Teaching and practicing alternative behaviors instead of the generic NO is very effective.
 

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1. That’s not the best way to teach leave it, no matter the age, much less 6 months.

2. If your dog is “coming up the leash” after a correction, dial it back a couple notches. Unless you’re a fan of getting bit, then by all means crank & yank away.

I’m very pro prong collar by the way.

ETA: before the self righteous brigade jumps my case I was being facetious, don’t crank & yank your dog.
 
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He needs to clearly understand the command "leave it" first before you start using corrections. He thought the correction was unfair and perhaps doesn't understand what he's being corrected for. The timing of the correction could also have been off.
 

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I started doing schutzhund with my dog when she was six. The trainer was pretty harsh with his corrections, and she bit him several times, hard enough to draw blood. This was a dog who had NEVER bitten me, even as a puppy going through the landshark stage! Okay, certainly not hard enough to draw blood...

So, agree with others above - the correction was too harsh and the dog felt it was unfair.

I use both prong collars and choke chains when necessary, so I am not anti-correction by any means.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you everyone for your advice! I’ll be using the It’s Yer Choice video today for sure, and lightening up on the intensity of the pops though they’re not any stronger than usual. Appreciate everyone’s advice!
 

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Thank you everyone for your advice! I’ll be using the It’s Yer Choice video today for sure, and lightening up on the intensity of the pops though they’re not any stronger than usual. Appreciate everyone’s advice!
Most people on here are not anti prong.

Most people on here do not use prongs for corrections for teaching simple obedience or behaviors, especially on a puppy.

Just what is it that your puppy is doing that is prompting you to keep a prong on it and use strong corrections? I suspect there is more going on here than a puppy trying to grab a towel. Maybe the people here could help you if they knew what was going on.
 
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