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Why is he doing this ?! It seems like his nipping is getting worse and he tries to attack sometimes. When he is nipping he’s told no and whatever playing we’re doing we stop. Thinking of getting a muzzle because we have 3 small kids
 

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How old is the puppy? EDIT: I see in another thread that he's 12 weeks old.
Why did you get a GSD with 3 small kids?
What is your experience with large dogs or large herding breeds?

Can you post a video showing where you feel "he tries to attack"?

PS
You don't muzzle a puppy ....

Dozens of puppy biting threads on here. Read all of them.
 

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Because he’s 12 weeks old and bored, and needs more exercise and mental stimulation.
 
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Why is he doing this ?! It seems like his nipping is getting worse and he tries to attack sometimes. When he is nipping he’s told no and whatever playing we’re doing we stop. Thinking of getting a muzzle because we have 3 small kids
So you got a GSD. They are bred to chase and bite stuff. You need to train the puppy.

 

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They have teeth. Don't muzzle the puppy, not for being a puppy. You need to remove the puppy from the kids when either the puppy or the kids START to get overwhelmed. If you see things getting rough get the puppy out of there, and work with him. You have to teach the puppy, you also have to teach the kids.
 

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FYI, the breed rescue I work with has had TWO 12-week-old puppies surrendered by owners with young kids in the last 6 weeks. Both bought them from breeders who happily took their money and sold them a puppy without inquiring into their inexperience, or the age of the kids. The kids were miserable being used as the chew toys and having their stuff destroyed. The parents were stressed out and scared for the kids. The puppies were just puppies.

Be realistic with yourself that puppies actually tend to be more challenging as they get bigger -- adolescence and boundary-testing between 6-12 months can be a lot worse than puppy-mouthing at 3 months. At least puppies are cute -- adolescent buttheads aren't when they're 80-pounds of untrained energy. You either resolve to educate yourself on what you bought and get the kids on board with a trainer (for the humans on how to productively interact with a dog)....or he needs another home while he's still young and cute. A good training class isn't optional for an inexperienced owner with this breed--it's fundamental to learning how to raise a "good" dog.

BTW, one of the pups we've got in rescue right now had been with his fam for exactly one month (weeks 8-12) before we got him. That was enough time to teach him he can bite anything he wants, chomp down without consequences, and get away with anything. He had learned that biting humans helped to get his way -- don't want your ears cleaned? CHOMP. Hate getting a bath? CHOMP. Taking a toy away? CHOMP. Not giving you attention? CHOMP. Hungry? CHOMP. The family that owned him had taught him that CHOMP was an effective way of communicating with them. So now his foster family is spending weeks undoing that.
 

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Why did you get a GSD with 3 small kids?
Hi, not trying to be controversial or contentious but why is this is an issue exactly? Every reputable breeder has on their website (and most dog/pet theory websites) that I am looking at has on their website that the GSD is a good family breed of dog and supposedly good with children. Some of them have house raised GSD they keep as family pets around their own young children and presumably so do some of the owners on this forum.

I ask, because I am considering getting a GSD and also have 1 young child (aged 6) - does that mean I should not get a GSD? Surely it's about how the GSD or any other dog is trained (and its temperament)? If not, and again not trying to be contentious, does this mean I should get another breed?

I get that the breed may be too much to handle for a first time dog owner of any sort, but that is different from someone who has had dogs before, but not a GSD in particular.

Presumably every GSD owner on here that does not come from some type of professional working dog handler/trainer capacity was a first time GSD owner themselves at some point.
 

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Hi, not trying to be controversial or contentious but why is this is an issue exactly? Every reputable breeder has on their website that I am looking at has on their website that the GSD is a good family breed of dog and some of them have house raised GSD they keep as family pets around their own young children.

I ask, because I am considering getting a GSD and also have 1 young child (aged 6) - does that mean I should not get a GSD? Surely it's about how the GSD or any other dog is trained? If not, and again not trying to be contentious, does this mean I should get another breed?
Because it would seem that a huge number of people are unaware that puppies require time, energy and training. They bite, chew, pee, howl and carry on. they require teaching and training to turn them into wonderful family pets. They do not arrive on your doorstep preprogrammed and ready to go.
They are the perfect family dog and a well bred, stable dog can adjust to any situation with the right owners.
 

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Because it would seem that a huge number of people are unaware that puppies require time, energy and training. They bite, chew, pee, howl and carry on. they require teaching and training to turn them into wonderful family pets. They do not arrive on your doorstep preprogrammed and ready to go.
They are the perfect family dog and a well bred, stable dog can adjust to any situation with the right owners.
Yes that is fair enough and a much more reasonable answer (and in general can be applied to all breed of puppies/dogs that are acquired by people without the commitment) - I agree entirely.
But that is not what, at least to me, "why did you get a GSD with 3 small kids" infers. If OP had gotten an aggressive nippy pomeranian puppy (and I've had the unfortunate experience with a friend's untrained pommy), would someone say "why did you get a pomeranian with 3 small kids?" 😀

On that note, what do people think about getting a puppy that is 4-5 months old and has already been fully obedience trained. Obviously one needs to maintain the training daily but presumably this allows one to bypass some of the less desirable aspects of raising a puppy. Curious if anyone on here has done this or considered it at least?
 

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Yes that is fair enough and a much more reasonable answer (and in general can be applied to all breed of puppies/dogs that are acquired by people without the commitment) - I agree entirely.
But that is not what, at least to me, "why did you get a GSD with 3 small kids" infers. If OP had gotten an aggressive nippy pomeranian puppy (and I've had the unfortunate experience with a friend's untrained pommy), would someone say "why did you get a pomeranian with 3 small kids?" 😀
Because the general consensus is that people will not do what they need and then will blame the dogs. My parents just let me get chewed on until me and the pups worked it out.
 

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Frankly, a reputable breeder of poms would have been very hesitant to place a puppy with small children. Many won't. Small children are a lot of work and so is a puppy. That's compounded when you have a small breed pup that is easily injured. A GSD pup is a busy pup and needs a lot of interaction, training and WORK to be the wonderful family dog you see when they get to be .... 3 ;)

At 4-5 months, mine was still an exhausting work in progress, regardless of knowing obedience commands.
 

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Yes that is fair enough and a much more reasonable answer (and in general can be applied to all breed of puppies/dogs that are acquired by people without the commitment) - I agree entirely.
But that is not what, at least to me, "why did you get a GSD with 3 small kids" infers. If OP had gotten an aggressive nippy pomeranian puppy (and I've had the unfortunate experience with a friend's untrained pommy), would someone say "why did you get a pomeranian with 3 small kids?" 😀

On that note, what do people think about getting a puppy that is 4-5 months old and has already been fully obedience trained. Obviously one needs to maintain the training daily but presumably this allows one to bypass some of the less desirable aspects of raising a puppy. Curious if anyone on here has done this or considered it at least?
An aggressive nippy pom isn't going to cause life altering injuries.

GSDs are bred to chase and bite stuff. Without proper training, that's what they do, and they pick the target. They are also naturally suspicious. Without proper training, they pick what they are reactive to and how they choose to react.

I have a working line GSD with kids and babies around. They are incredible family dogs with proper training and leadership. Everyone that owns GSDs was a first time owner at one point. With the right dog and trainer, you will be fine.
 
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Shield K9 has an option to have a puppy fully obedience trained and sent to new owners at 4-5 months old. Assuming the training they provide is good and assuming the new owner does a reasonable job maintaining this training, does anyone see any downsides to doing this? Aside from missing out on some of the joys of bonding with an 8 week old puppy, there is the benefit of avoiding some of the more undesirable aspects of young puppies. Wondering whether or not this is a good option for families with a young child if one themselves are not a very good trainer? Thoughts?
 

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See above. They get more difficult after 5 months, not easier. You miss the cute part and get the "let me test boundaries with the rookie" part. Unless that program involves ongoing training for you, the owner, as the dog enters adolescence, I think your expectations of what a "trained puppy" means might be out of sync with the reality of living with one. There's no "off the shelf" good dog -- good dogs are earned through a lot of work, even if someone else starts them out with good foundation.
 

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Yes that is definitely a consideration, although they apparently use e collars and in order to ensure maintenance of the obedience they say to keep using them. Having never used clickers or e collars before in my life with any of my previous dogs, curious how many people on here used them for a. training and b. no longer use them or still keep them on the collar?
 

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Hi, not trying to be controversial or contentious but why is this is an issue exactly? Every reputable breeder has on their website (and most dog/pet theory websites) that I am looking at has on their website that the GSD is a good family breed of dog and supposedly good with children. Some of them have house raised GSD they keep as family pets around their own young children and presumably so do some of the owners on this forum.

I ask, because I am considering getting a GSD and also have 1 young child (aged 6) - does that mean I should not get a GSD? Surely it's about how the GSD or any other dog is trained (and its temperament)? If not, and again not trying to be contentious, does this mean I should get another breed?

I get that the breed may be too much to handle for a first time dog owner of any sort, but that is different from someone who has had dogs before, but not a GSD in particular.

Presumably every GSD owner on here that does not come from some type of professional working dog handler/trainer capacity was a first time GSD owner themselves at some point.
I asked because he is an obvious new to dogs and GSD owner (asking about muzzling a puppy) who obviously hasn't researched the breed. They are great with young kids, I have doe it several times myself with both infants and young children in the house and have all the requisite cute pictures.
But if he doesn't understand the nipping (and he uses "attacking" for which I asked to see video and he hasn't provided) and thinks a muzzle will help, I think it's a great thing to ask as to why they got a working/herding/drive breed with three young children.

In this case, I'm pretty sure he shouldn't have and should get a trainer.....too many dogs re-homed or out down from this situation
Why is he doing this ?! It seems like his nipping is getting worse and he tries to attack sometimes. When he is nipping he’s told no and whatever playing we’re doing we stop. Thinking of getting a muzzle because we have 3 small kids
 

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Hi, not trying to be controversial or contentious but why is this is an issue exactly? Every reputable breeder has on their website (and most dog/pet theory websites) that I am looking at has on their website that the GSD is a good family breed of dog and supposedly good with children. Some of them have house raised GSD they keep as family pets around their own young children and presumably so do some of the owners on this forum.

I ask, because I am considering getting a GSD and also have 1 young child (aged 6) - does that mean I should not get a GSD? Surely it's about how the GSD or any other dog is trained (and its temperament)? If not, and again not trying to be contentious, does this mean I should get another breed?

I get that the breed may be too much to handle for a first time dog owner of any sort, but that is different from someone who has had dogs before, but not a GSD in particular.

Presumably every GSD owner on here that does not come from some type of professional working dog handler/trainer capacity was a first time GSD owner themselves at some point.
Well, it depends on the pup and it depends on the kids, and it's hard to know when one is eight weeks old and the others are whatever age, what is likely not to work out. I would say, if you kid is a drama queen, but the thing is, too many parents can't see their kids without some amount of bias. And a real drama queen in other respects may put up with all sorts of puppy biting. I'd like to say that you should go with a quieter, less drivy, bitey, show-line of either American or German lines, than a crazy working line. But I would be wrong there too. The working lines tend to be more confident and can often put up with babies and children better than some of the show line dogs. Some of the show line dogs that might be fear-biters with men, maybe be awesome with kids. As is the case with all living things, there just is no perfect recipe. If you could crunch the numbers into a machine, where you put in all the information, age and lines and sex of the dog, litter size, number of full-siblings that had success with children of what ages, and the vital statistics of you kids, and asked for a 99.9% rate of positive reactions, you could probably get an answer of what pup to look for or not to look for. And you would be the exception of the rule, good or bad.

At the end of the day, you make it work out. If you and any other adult is 100% on board with getting a puppy and what kind, and willing to do what it takes, are committed, then you can make it work out. Getting a pup from a good breeder, and maybe a breeder with kids, whose adult dogs seem confident around children, that's stacking the deck in your favor. Puppies are a crap shoot. I don't know if GSDs are the best beginner dogs. When we were kids, we had a beagle-mix that would trip us with its chain, jump on us and make huge holes on us with its never-been-trimmed toenails, and rip our pant legs into shreds when our legs were in them. I don't know that Perky ever bit anyone though.

I will say this though, children who are raised with dogs, pups, are much less likely to be seriously bitten by dogs throughout their lives. I don't think it is a good idea to not have dogs when you have kids. And I don't think GSDs are a worse candidate than other breeds as a dog to raise up your kids with, so long as the adults want a dog, a large dog, a dog with energy and drive and the ability to get in serious trouble if not trained and socialized.
 
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