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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Is it just a puppy thing or do all your dogs just want to play with other dogs? When we go to the off leash areas, many bets are off if he's unleashed when he sees another dog, regardless or not whether the other dog wants to play with him, he will try to. It is very hard to call him off this and I have not found a way around it besides leashing him, which kind of defeats the purpose of going. but he will sprint 200-300 yards down the beach to see other dogs.

He also does this when I let him off in the back yard, if the front gate is open and he so much as thinks that he hears the tinkling of tags, he sprints through and has to say hello to the other dogs. Steak does not work, his ball does not work, his frisbee does not work. :crazy: He is 9.5months now. He had gone through formal classes twice now, but he was always fairly or very distracted by other dogs. He has been corrected very harshly for doing this by other dogs plenty of times, but continues to go up to those same dogs even at that moment or at a different time.

Not very aloof if you ask me. or maybe I'm not fun
 

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My 2 cents;

I would correct this, much like you would correct any other behaviour, in a very controlled environment where you are able to dictate everything that happens.

1) Be in a room with just you and your dog, reward your dog for giving you attention.
2) have a friend with a very well behaved dog, visit you and come into the room.
3) Make sure you dog is leashed, and if he is too excited, ask your friend to leave and enter when your dog calms down.
4) slowly introduce your dog to your friends dog, by rewarding him with good behaviour (treats, "Good Boy!", Strokes, more time with the friends dog).
5) If your dog offers bad behaviour, remove the other dog from the room until your dog is calm.
6) as your dog gets the idea, try it in a more informal setting (outside, leashed), reward, and praise for good behaviour, and correct ("NO!") and remove the other dog for bad behaviour.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
My 2 cents;

I would correct this, much like you would correct any other behaviour, in a very controlled environment where you are able to dictate everything that happens.

1) Be in a room with just you and your dog, reward your dog for giving you attention.
2) have a friend with a very well behaved dog, visit you and come into the room.
3) Make sure you dog is leashed, and if he is too excited, ask your friend to leave and enter when your dog calms down.
4) slowly introduce your dog to your friends dog, by rewarding him with good behaviour (treats, "Good Boy!", Strokes, more time with the friends dog).
5) If your dog offers bad behaviour, remove the other dog from the room until your dog is calm.
6) as your dog gets the idea, try it in a more informal setting (outside, leashed), reward, and praise for good behaviour, and correct ("NO!") and remove the other dog for bad behaviour.
I had practiced this many times in class. The best way to get him to offer attention if I stand in front of him, blocking his path. If we are working on heeling, sits, stays, focus, he does not mind the other dogs. Leashed walks, must call for him to heel or he will stop and sniff or turn around and go for them. I reward him with off leash time if he does something, sit, heel, focus, recall. Don't get me wrong it is better than an aggressive dog, which is what I am trying to avoid by keeping him under control in those times when other dogs just do not like him, but when he gets into puppy play mode, he is all out and very hard to get back in to working mode, even if it is just for a recall.
 

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I think that for his own safety the behavior should be corrected, but it is nice to hear about a GSD that just wants to play and not kill:D My dog loves other dogs, but she doesn't go out of her way to play with them unless she knows them(like the neighbors dog). We can go to the pet store she pretty much ignores them, unless they approach her or bark at her..then she looks at them like "Whatcha barking at?" This doesn't happen to often, because when people see her coming they just grab their dog go the other way...pretty fast:( You have to find a way to train him with these distractions so he doesn't get hurt. Have you tried doing some training at the dog park, but outside the fence? This way he can see the dogs, but can't get to them and its easier to correct the behavior...a long line would work well for this.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think that for his own safety the behavior should be corrected, but it is nice to hear about a GSD that just wants to play and not kill:D My dog loves other dogs, but she doesn't go out of her way to play with them unless she knows them(like the neighbors dog). We can go to the pet store she pretty much ignores them, unless they approach her or bark at her..then she looks at them like "Whatcha barking at?" This doesn't happen to often, because when people see her coming they just grab their dog go the other way...pretty fast:( You have to find a way to train him with these distractions so he doesn't get hurt. Have you tried doing some training at the dog park, but outside the fence? This way he can see the dogs, but can't get to them and its easier to correct the behavior...a long line would work well for this.
I have yet to define the trigger really, when we are indoors or on a hike (trails and off leash) he will be fairly good and ignore other dogs, as long as they are passing by. Sometimes he gets caught up and chooses to play. If I keep walking and say nothing, he will lag behind as long as possible and then sprint back to me. Then in dog parks, leashed walks, forget it, he wants to meet everyone. I do correct him on lead if he breaks a heel command. I have tried training outside the dog park. He listens (sit, stay, heel), but stays focused on the other dogs inside - the gsd stare - and will whine the whole time like "let me in there!!"... then also when he actually meets the other dogs, some of the time he's done and comes back. Just wants to get to know who's around? Though if the other dog shows any signs of playfulness, off he goes. He ignores squirrels, people, children without any command from me. I'm just really confused by it, but the more I think, it is the training once more, what else could it be?
 

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I'm just really confused by it, but the more I think, it is the training once more, what else could it be?
Have you taught leave it or watch me commands?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Have you taught leave it or watch me commands?
Yes, fairly strong leave it (but not cat poop) - usually followed by recall or heel so it is almost automatic in most situations. Focus yes, very good again. Can recall from the middle of him chasing a deer, have done over 300 yards away in the middle of the woods, but when he gets into play mode, again, tough to stop him, I need to actually walk up and leash him, if I can catch them. And it's strange that when another dog - usually the smaller ones - is nipping at him and trying to get him to stop, he goes right back into it, ignores my commands and ignores their corrections. If a larger dog does it, back up he goes - once a hundred pound really dominant male gsd pretty much attacked him and pinned him for trying to say hello, got him off, and back into his face he went. That is what really concerns me. Dominance thing perhaps?
 

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Yes, fairly strong leave it (but not cat poop) - usually followed by recall or heel so it is almost automatic in most situations. Focus yes, very good again. Can recall from the middle of him chasing a deer, have done over 300 yards away in the middle of the woods, but when he gets into play mode, again, tough to stop him, I need to actually walk up and leash him, if I can catch them. And it's strange that when another dog - usually the smaller ones - is nipping at him and trying to get him to stop, he goes right back into it, ignores my commands and ignores their corrections. If a larger dog does it, back up he goes - once a hundred pound really dominant male gsd pretty much attacked him and pinned him for trying to say hello, got him off, and back into his face he went. That is what really concerns me. Dominance thing perhaps?
Why don't you try a long line inside the dog park? This way you can correct him before he takes off. It can be a controlled play time. You can then use the long line, leave it, and watch me all together.
 

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Why don't you try a long line inside the dog park? This way you can correct him before he takes off. It can be a controlled play time. You can then use the long line, leave it, and watch me all together.
I think this is a good idea, he still gets the freedom, but u also have the control to correct him when needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I will certainly up the training once again, I do think that is the only way around this, yes training seems to be the go-to answer I don't know why I ask any more... I really like the fact that he is a social butterfly, but it seems conflicting with breed standards, (my original concern) then again I am sure he was not bred under standards (puppy mill) so probably was bred out of him at some point.
 

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I will certainly up the training once again, I do think that is the only way around this, yes training seems to be the go-to answer I don't know why I ask any more... I really like the fact that he is a social butterfly, but it seems conflicting with breed standards, (my original concern) then again I am sure he was not bred under standards (puppy mill) so probably was bred out of him at some point.
Breed standard calls for them to be aloof, but is that in general or around people, dogs, all of the above? I think that you have a young dog that wants to have fun. He knows that the dog park is play time, he just doesn't understand that when you say its done its done. He is probably in a very excitable state at that point. I would think that you could try to go to him instead of calling him to you(you are probably pretty close to destroying the come command). You will probably have to calm him down, that is the switch your looking for, he has to learn how to calm down just as fast as he gets excited.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Breed standard calls for them to be aloof, but is that in general or around people, dogs, all of the above?
Beats me, maybe someone else could answer this. He is plenty aloof around people. And all I know is every other GSD that I have met cares little for other dogs would rather fetch with their handler than play with other dogs. but every dog is different, and yeah, is still young I know, and yeah, obviously I still need to work plenty with him. my work is cut out.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks dad.

jae; said:
He had gone through formal classes twice now,
jae; said:
I had practiced this many times in class.
jae; said:
If we are working on heeling, sits, stays, focus,
jae; said:
I have tried training outside the dog park.
jae; said:
I think, it is the training once more, what else could it be?
jae; said:
Yes, fairly strong leave it ... followed by recall or heel so it is almost automatic in most situations. Focus yes, very good again.
jae; said:
I will certainly up the training once again...yes training seems to be the go-to answer I don't know why I ask any more
jae; said:
yeah, obviously I still need to work plenty with him
 

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Beats me, maybe someone else could answer this. He is plenty aloof around people. And all I know is every other GSD that I have met cares little for other dogs would rather fetch with their handler than play with other dogs. but every dog is different, and yeah, is still young I know, and yeah, obviously I still need to work plenty with him. my work is cut out.
Just make training fun for both of you. Training is life long with lots of mistakes along the way. They are a wonderful breed and the more you know about them and what they need the better off the whole relationship will be. You'll get to where you need to be:)
 
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