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Hey guys

Z is over 6 months now, she has gone very tall and weighs 60lbs. Since we first had her we have always had the problem of her jumping up onto the dining table and stealing food. We have tried pushing her off saying no etc but now its just getting out of hand because not only she is much bigger and stronger. She is becoming even aggressive whenever we push her off, by this I mean very aggressive. She growls and attacks us with powerful bites and this happens every time for the past few months almost every single day and is getting extremely fustrated. I also dont want to crate her during dinner time bc I am afraid it will only get worse when she is even bigger and we dont want to use crates.

Please help is it normal?


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why don't you want to crate her? She hasn't earned the right to be with you when you eat. If it were a human child behaving like this you'd put them in a high chair and tell them they had to stay there.

you could also use Sit On The Dog Leash. You have to be firm and keep the leash short. Then when the meal is over, then they get some food in their bowl. This is how we taught our dogs to behave at restaurant patios.

So basically you have to draw the line and someone has enforce that line. It may mean missing a couple of dinners but it shouldn't take long for the pup to figure out that you mean business.

as far as the growling, I don't think it is aggressive. You pup probably thinks you are playing some awesome game!
 

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Crate her!! This behavior has been reinforced for the past few months (your timeline) and will take some time to replace. Keep a short lead on her while inside. If you have to lead her to the crate, you have the lead to use instead of reaching for the collar (helps avoid other issues). When you are done with your meal AND the table is cleaned off (set her up to win); let her out to eat her meal.

Begin solid OB training. Some would say you can do this yourself; however there is already a history that will require a more experienced eye to be involved.
 

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When max was a young pup he was very obnoxious at dinner time he would try to swipe something off the table when given a chance or not. One time we were over my mom and dads house -max was 12 weeks old -and max swooped in and grabbed a piece of hamburger as my dad was about to put it in his mouth!!!
We would hAve to crate max then later on put on a leash-"Sit on the dog" -This all took some time but learned how to control his impulses and lay down and watches us eat and sometimes fall asleep. . Almost thought that might not happen but it did with much effort on my part. He knew when he behaved he would get some left overs. I have seen this on this forum when Chip posted about "sit on the dog" a great thing to teach your dog.
http://youtu.be/W2WgOZUebnY
 

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I use a short tether leash on a puppy while I am eating, starting from the day we get the puppy. The dog is expected to lie quietly at my feet. At 9 months, my puppy will now lie down next to me without the lead. I did it every single time. He chewed through a few when I wasn't paying attention but he never steals food. If you crate him, it will stop but you need to work on food aggression because that is not an acceptable behave and it will just get worse. I don't have experience with that, but others here do.
 

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I looked back thru your previous posts and it appears you've been having issues for the last few months which sound like it's escalating. I can't tell if this is a case of an actually aggressive dog (and yes, dogs this young can just be genetically aggressive!) or if it's a case of a puppy being a jerk for lack of leadership and appropriate correction. But, given this statement

She growls and attacks us with powerful bites and this happens every time for the past few months almost every single day
I would advise you get someone in there to evaluate the dog and conditions. She will only get bigger, more powerful and more out of control. Where do you live at so people can advise a trainer?
 

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omg...that is NOT anything like "table training, aggression work". ZERO resemblance. Don't even say things like that so people that have no knowledge of table training can run with it. Not even as a joke.
 

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sounds like unintentional TABLE training , aggression work .

dog needs to be read the riot act. NOW.
Sounds like you had too much morning coffee. She/he needs serious advice. Crating during time you cannot work with her is the thing to do. The dog will never forget the success of stealing from the table; it is a life-long issue. Fortunately there are worse problems.
 

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omg...that is NOT anything like "table training, aggression work". ZERO resemblance. Don't even say things like that so people that have no knowledge of table training can run with it. Not even as a joke.


why not ?
that is the image that comes immediately to mind.

if I understand the dog is standing four paws on the table. ?

dog is on table , defends the space , owners go in there acting like a decoy doing prey work - forward motion in and backing off (with fright) when dog shows teath or barks and so dog gets ramped on the table .

UNINTENTIONAL ---

the dog is guarding territory and resource

he needs to be sent a message so that he doesn't even , ever, think to jump onto the table.

how do you let this develop . Apparently this has happened since the dog was a pup.

" She growls and attacks us with powerful bites and this happens every time for the past few months almost every single day"

this is serious.

I wonder what else is going on where the dog is allowed to rule the roost?

get the dog into a crate .
Keep the dog out of any dining area where you should be able to eat in peace and
quiet . No dog begging or intimidating.

don't feed from the table . don't feed from the counter during food prep in the kitchen .
don't let the dog push your buttons.


This is where aversive correction -- one
 

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wolfy dog;7943545The dog will never forget the success of stealing from the table; it is a life-long issue[/QUOTE said:
You could be right...but I'd wager....a few sessions around the table coupled with properly timed adequate corrections will also never be forgotten ....


SuperG
 

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why don't you want to crate her? She hasn't earned the right to be with you when you eat. If it were a human child behaving like this you'd put them in a high chair and tell them they had to stay there.

you could also use Sit On The Dog Leash. You have to be firm and keep the leash short. Then when the meal is over, then they get some food in their bowl. This is how we taught our dogs to behave at restaurant patios.

So basically you have to draw the line and someone has enforce that line. It may mean missing a couple of dinners but it shouldn't take long for the pup to figure out that you mean business.

as far as the growling, I don't think it is aggressive. You pup probably thinks you are playing some awesome game!
How do you know when it's aggression or not? If it were me, I would think it's aggression. Because you are sort of taking away their food by not letting them get on the table. How do you know when it's aggression or not?
 

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Possibly unintentional object guard training, but I'm picturing the dog putting her front two feet on the table, not all four feet. So not really table training.

Not even close to normal behavior. Begging is normal, stealing food is normal. A dog growling and biting people over the people's food at the dinner table is not normal.

A few options.

Crate the dog.

Train the dog to a solid down-stay. Like a poster mentioned sit on the leash. That can take some effort and be annoying while eating dinner, but will work.

Correct the dog firmly and strongly. That is more difficult to do right. Since it's gotten to this point with the OP, to go this route find a good trainer and work with him or her.

I'm guessing there are issues with other aspects of the human-dog relationship?
 

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Why bother sugarcoating the method for correcting via a crate ...which most likely will only manage the problem due to lack of access.

I know what I would do.....and it would resemble "leave it" training...heavy consequence/correction for even lifting those front paws off the ground to get on the table. I'd set the dog up for failure...all kinds of food on the table...close to the edge... to make sure he wanted to get on the table....makes the timing easier for the correction. First time the dog walks past the table on lead without trying to pull its crap....plenty of reward then.

But that's just me....

SuperG
 

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Super G, yes that is how I'd handle it, too. Corrections for sure.

But, if this is the only place where there is conflict, putting the dog up while eating, while just a management technique, can't be done "wrong".

I am afraid if the dog has gotten this bad already, a trainer might be in order. Because I could see some conflict resulting from this if the OP does it wrong. Someone might get hurt. Dog has already shown she is willing to put teeth on skin over this issue.
 

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"if this is the only place where there is conflict, putting the dog up while eating,"

probably isn't the only place where there is conflict -- use of crate is so objectionable it makes
me wonder if the dog has any limitations to behaviour.
 

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Why bother sugarcoating the method for correcting via a crate ...which most likely will only manage the problem due to lack of access.

I know what I would do.....and it would resemble "leave it" training...heavy consequence/correction for even lifting those front paws off the ground to get on the table. I'd set the dog up for failure...all kinds of food on the table...close to the edge... to make sure he wanted to get on the table....makes the timing easier for the correction. First time the dog walks past the table on lead without trying to pull its crap....plenty of reward then.

But that's just me....

SuperG
Definitely. This dog is running the show. I would use a long line with a prong to correct the first couple times. Dog jumps, Whap Correction.

BUT - previous posts say this behavior is not just restricted to the table and has been going on for a couple of months. This is a young dog barely out of puppyhood. I think there have been zero rules, impulse control, manners. IMO, this person could really benefit from a trainer to show them how.
 

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I agree, Carm, that there is probably conflict elsewhere. But for tonight's dinner, why not crate the pup while this whole thing is figured out. Or put her in the yard, or whatever.

I believe management is a fine tool for some cases. A leash, for example, if the owner can't bother to teach a recall.

All about keeping dogs and people safe. So many people never bother to train anything.
 

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Well then .... Rules, Structure and Limitations ... "Clearly" this dog has none! A "trainer" can't fix this ... as long as the at home conditions don't change. The OP needs to either up his game or rehome the dog, pretty much that simple.

If rehoming is not on the table ... then it's time to :
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For the dog.

A "Prong Collar" is not a "viable' option for this owner at this time. If they understood how to "properly" use a "Prong Collar" then most likely ... they would not be having these issues?? The dog needs a "reset" "Behaviour Modification Protocol" to stop the table crap .. right "Freaking Now" and then "work" on the rest of the dog's issues ie "Taining."

It's not that hard to send a proper message ... the "OP" just has to know how ?? Option one an E-Collar, crank it up high, wait for the dog to do the behavior and hold the button down for a count of three, ... the table problem ... solved! That is "NOT" how you "Train" a dog with an E-Collar but it is how you stop crap like this!

Looks like this:

That's a "Checkbook" solution because your going to have to buy an "E-Collar" and learn how to set it up. If you go through that much trouble and expense, then ... you might as well find a "Trainer" to learn how to "Train" your dog properly with an E-Collar.

Option two can give the same results and cost, ... "Nothing" use a "Bonker!" A towel bound with rubber bands, when the dog commits to the act ... you throw the "Bonker" at the dog and "hit him in the head with it" deliver an "Aversive" and teach him "to make better choices!!"

So ... yesterday should be the last day "that" crap happens. Sally Scooter can demonstrate.:

Beyond that ... its' time to "make some changes" in how this dogs lives in this household ... "Crate Train" the dog. "Train Place and do Sit on the Dog" and institute a "No Free Roaming in the house Policy and keep a "Drag Leash" ( a leash with no handle to get caught on furniture) on the Dog for use inside, so you "don't" have to be laying hands on the dog. You would grab the leash to guide the dog either back to "Place" or to his "Crate" because indoors ... that is where this dog "needs" to be for the next 30 to 90 days. And if the biting and jumping is an issue?? Just se a "Pet Convincer." :Pet Convincer.com

Or go to a "Bicycle Shop" an but a Bicycle Air Pump ...have the cost. Moving on. The following is under "The New Dog a Challenge" heading but it would best to just flat "start over" ... see here.:

https://stickydogblog.com/2012/10/11/i-just-got-a-rescued-dog-what-do-i-do/

And the details for "Place/Crate and No Free Roaming ... can be found here:
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/7837361-post12.html

None of it is hard and the whole of the "process" is what "Rules, Structure and Limitations" or (Management) looks like. The only thing required is "commitment" from the owner to get it right.

http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/7837361-post12.html

Oh yeah and ... find a trainer:
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/7378442-post9.html
 
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