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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all!!

I am new on this board and im from Denmark.

I got a 9 week puppy (male GS), that me and my girlfriend have had for a week now.

We live in an apartment and things are going ok.. He has 1-2 accidents a day inside, but most of his potty is outside. We try as hard as we can to notice, when he is searching to get out..

Our big problem is his teething and biting in everything.. He bites our ankles, hands etc. really hard and wont let go. We have tried every single advice from squelling with a high voice, giving him timouts in another room (Then he just starts barking like crazy, but we dont let him out until he is quiet). We've tried to startle him with waterspray, loud noise (coin in can), saying "no" etc..

He understands the command "No", when i train with goodies and he also understand "release", when training with goodies.. But when he gets too playful and excited then he wont listen or let go.. Her just latches on and hold on tight. When we try to walk away he just run after biting even harder.. When we give him time out in another room, he reenters a few minutes after starting all over.. He also barks A LOT during his "freak-outs"..

We live in an apartment, and has neighbours to worry about..

But our biggest problem is his freakouts.. We are getting a bit desperate sometimes, because he really bites hard and a lot. Barks and snap at our hands.. We walk him 3 times a day and we bring him to the dogpark every other day..

/Kim
 

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I probably would wait on the dog park until he has had a couple sets of vaccines in him. 9-10 weeks is very vulnerable yet to diseases.

Have you tried offering chews and redirecting to the chew. Raw marrow bones are good and when he gets the marrow out, you can fill with peanut butter. You can freeze a cotton rope and that will feel good while he chews on it. You can have a special chew item he only gets while in his time-out area that he can work on that will help him by satisfying the need to chew/teethe and keep him busy so he doesn't bark.

Is the timeout area behind a shut door, or in an x-pen or behind a baby gate. The point is not to isolate him -- closing the door. But just to keep him from being able to eat you. But he can still be in an area where he can see and hear everything going on. Baby gates can be very good for this.

Remember he is a baby and chew he must. I always teach mine the GENTLE command with a treat. And then I apply it to things, Gentle with my fingers. Don't offer him fingers. put your had into a fist -- much less pleasant to bite a fist, the mouth does not fit around it as well -- not much you can do about the ankles though, except separating the ankles and the puppy when it gets to be too much.
 

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I probably would wait on the dog park until he has had a couple sets of vaccines in him. 9-10 weeks is very vulnerable yet to diseases.

Have you tried offering chews and redirecting to the chew. Raw marrow bones are good and when he gets the marrow out, you can fill with peanut butter. You can freeze a cotton rope and that will feel good while he chews on it. You can have a special chew item he only gets while in his time-out area that he can work on that will help him by satisfying the need to chew/teethe and keep him busy so he doesn't bark.

Is the timeout area behind a shut door, or in an x-pen or behind a baby gate. The point is not to isolate him -- closing the door. But just to keep him from being able to eat you. But he can still be in an area where he can see and hear everything going on. Baby gates can be very good for this.

Remember he is a baby and chew he must. I always teach mine the GENTLE command with a treat. And then I apply it to things, Gentle with my fingers. Don't offer him fingers. put your had into a fist -- much less pleasant to bite a fist, the mouth does not fit around it as well -- not much you can do about the ankles though, except separating the ankles and the puppy when it gets to be too much.
@ Selzer, we hae tried to redirect his attention to his chewing-toys, bones etc, but human feet and ankles are much more fun and moves around more :) But i will try the rope and marrow-bone..

We just bought a babygitter today, so he wont be isolated, but can have visual contact to us..

Thanks for the advice.. Keep'em coming :D
 

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Is he getting enough sleep? You should probably crate him for an hour long nap every two hours or so to make sure he isn't overtired, my girl did this very early on and that was the main cause - we were letting her sleep in the living room but realized distractions always woke her up so it was never good solid rest.

Leg biting and biting other things we would lightly grab her scruff and pull her just until she let go while saying "no" in a deep voice and sticking a toy in her mouth. I'm not talking about picking the front legs off the ground or shaking the scruff, just enough pressure and a light backwards pull so that they realize they are being pulled off. Nothing aggressive or painful, that would make things worse. We also wore pants and long sleeved hoodies in the house so if she did get us we didn't have to jerk back so suddenly because that always got mine more excited.

If you've wore the puppy out by walking and playing and the biting still continues and seems to get worse its definitely overtiredness.

Ps: we're also in an apartment. it makes exercise so much more difficult sometimes but running around the house, scent games (we hide piles of Lara's food in corners, lock her in the xpen while we are placing them, and release her with "go find it" and the sniffing to hunt them out really tires out her mind, lots of mental stimulation) and training are your friends :)
 

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Hey Guys!!

Last two days has been a really living ****... He bites even more now.. Going totally crazy.. Peeing inside four times within an hour (He had just been outside for a walk).. He now plashes his water (We take it away and say "no", when he starts)... He bites and snaps at us.. Totally ignoring the "no".. When we train the no, by laying a snack on the floor before him, saying no when he tries to get it, he is VERY good and just keep staring at the snack, not taking it before he is given "go". So he understands the "no", but when he bites the cofee-table and us, he doesnt care..

We gave him a bone with marrow, which he loved.. After 15 minutes we took away (trading with a good treat), so that we can give the bone to him later, keeping it interessting...

We also tried the time-out behind a "fence", so that he can still see us. When he is in time-out he barks like CRAZY, but he is only let out when he is quiet, but when he comes out. He starts all over.

Running out of options, since nothing seems to work even the slightest.. We know, that he doesnt learn overnight, but nothing seems to catch to him at all. He just get more crazy..
 
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