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Hi guys, I'm sorry for annoying you all with the same questions, I've had my puppy for a week now he's 9 weeks old, almost 10, growing very fast.. So I wanted to get one issue addressed, the biting problem... I know he's a puppy he's curious they're suppose to bite and they're called 'land sharks' for a reason :wink2: (I warn everyone he is a little land shark ;p) but it's getting to the point he's drawing blood and only at 9 weeks.

The first method we were told to do was to say; "Ouch!" really loud and immediately end playtime and walk away, come back in 10 - 30 seconds, at first this method use to work lovely, but now it no longer does, instead he doesn't pay attention anymore when I walk away and end playtime and nor doesn't care... Now it's upgraded to a point where when I do this he wraps his whole mouth around my leg and starts biting, it really hurts, and I can't walk away because he's doing this, I don't wanna push him off because that makes matters worse.

The second method I attempted was redirecting my puppy with a toy. This method fails to work as well, I instantly try to get his attention on the toys, but he rather go for my hand and or still tries to bite my hand and doesn't care for the toys. Keep in mind.. I stuck to Method #1 the most throughout the time I had him while trying to redirect him with toys.

The third method I was told to do by some trainers and from reading online on the forum, and from some breeders was to hold his mouth close (not squeezing his mouth or any of that) - and hold it close and firmly say; "No biting!" - this method does not work either, and it promotes to him to bite even more and harder. Someone I know who is a trainer and has well-behaved dogs closed his mouth and made him accidentally bite his tongue (I believe), so it promoted him to bite and mouth more and then I yelled at her. I'm scared of doing this method because does it even work, I do not want him becoming fearful, nor do I ever want my puppy to follow-up from any abuse, ever, so should I keep going with this?

Today I called the breeder, earlier when I was walking him because again out of the blue on our walk he wraps his mouth around my leg and starts biting, so I decided to call the breeder, she told me to redirect him with toys, I told her that method isn't working so she told me to grab him by his scruff and say; "No!" firmly. Should I do this method for now on, what method should I do, is grabbing him by the scruff and saying NO ok?

I know he's just a baby, I'm just scared if this will continue into a very bad habit where he is actually biting as he's an adult, I don't want him being put down for biting nor do I wanna muzzle him because he has a glorious temperament and truly is a gentlemen pup. I have loads of marks on my hand from his teeth, and my skin tends to "pop-up" after his bite so I do a big soap and water rinse.

Hope you guys can help me out, when will he grow out of his behavior approximately? - I know he's clearly teething, I try to get him as many teething toys as possible that help with his mouth.

I will be taking him to obedience school when he is 12 weeks (get's his second sets of shots) for now I cannot have him near any other dog, and or take him there :( *sigh)
 

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I'd wear better protective clothing :) Go back over, and persevere with the advice you received in your previous thread.

Puppy biting... Hints and tips to help


There is no quick fix. Having a german shepherd puppy will be some of the best and worst moments of your life. It takes A LOT OF WORK, i.e. patience, perseverance, consistency, and time, to end up with a well behaved dog. But, the end result is worth it.

If your skin is allergically reacting to his saliva, taking antihistamines may help.
 

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You need to change the way you think. It is not using one technique for less than a week with a puppy and expect your training is done. Think Toddler... repetition over a much longer period of time. Some individuals that longer than others. But if you are clear, consistent, fair and reinforce the positive the Toddler does learn. Get ready to work with this dog pretty intensively for 18 months... at a minimum.

Enjoy and don't worry too much.
 

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NO no no " I know he's a puppy he's curious they're suppose to bite and they're called 'land sharks' for a reason "


they might , but they are not supposed to -- so QUIT this right now.


Dogs that are well socialized within their litter -- the right time and exposure to littermates and their DAM (which is often too little or too much) ---- and then shown what is expected - you are not a toy and you are not a playmate and you are not a victim (ouch?)
I don't like the advice on squealing or ouching - watch a litter with litter mates -- if there is too exuberant battle-play the recipient might squeak and then give the antagonist a good oh-yeah-take-this , and don't you being doing that to me again response .
If the recipient did not do this the antagonist would - what-a-wuss take some more of this -- and ramp up .


don't rile the dog up in frantic play where the dog is beyond capping
there is so much more to dog leadership than being a playmate
 

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We've found the absolute best way to curb this behavior is to grab them by the scruff give a gentle tug and literally growl at them. Deep gutteral grrrrr. A good dam does this to her pups when they do something they shouldn't. It's not mean, it's not too rough... these are dogs and they respond to dog ways. They aren't humans, so don't humanize them. You may have to do it repeatedly. Right now your puppy is telling you that he/she doesn't respect you at all. You are a play thing. This is BAD. If the biting continues and the pup doesnt get the message, the next step is pinning it to the ground on its side with a finger or two applying light pressure to the neck. Do NOT choke your dog. The idea is to dominate him with pressure on the neck like another dog would make him submit. Add the growl of course. Each time he bites pin him on his side, give his neck a light squeeze/growl and hold him there until he stops struggling. Make him submit to your authority now, or you are going to have a hard time later. Remember these aren't children. They need a pack leader not a playmate. I allow my dogs to lightly mouth me, but not bite. They NEED to have jaw control.
 

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Simply correct and redirect. Teach the dog what it is permitted to bite/chew utilizing both type No Bite/chew items & Bite/chew items consistency is key and often times produce very rapid and rewarding results. Good Luck!
 

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Absolutely nothing worked with our WL puppy. Nothing. I tried redirecting, squeezing, scruff shake, loud No, Ouch! He kept biting. I watched some of those videos and finally decided to use treats in a closed fist. I was surprised he began licking my first to get the treat out, so I kept doing that. When I got tired of treating, I shoved a toy in his mouth. Both worked but he was still biting, although much less.

Then I got creative and decided to look at WHY he was biting. WL dogs are very oral. They communicate with their teeth, so what was he telling me? I began noticing patterns. He bit me more when he was hungry or thirsty, when he needed to go outside, when he needed exercise or was tired. So I tried to give him what he needed. It worked somewhat. If he got really bad, I put him in the crate with some puppy chew toys. He could destroy many toys, so I picked carefully. The biting gradually stopped.

He learned bite inhibition, too, from our older dog, because he was hurting her as much as he was hurting us.
 

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As a breeder, I deal with this GSD pup issue from the very beginning before new owners have to suffer "land shark attacks".
First line of attack is that breeders not let the pups go to their new home until a minimum age of 8 weeks. Personally I try to keep my litters till the age of 12 weeks. I will let them go at 8 if there is an older dog in the home to mentor the pup through this "mouthy" period. The key factor in controlling this issue is with nipping in the bud before the pups begin to feel that mouthing humans is just a distraction for a real toy. Mother dog and siblings teach the pup bite inhibition using their mouths. They retaliate to show the pup what it feels like to get bitten. One day last week, when a prospective owner came to see the pups, Malibu did a demonstration of her method of pup control. Little Barry pup was just totally excited showing off for the visiting stranger and he nipped at his mother. She immediately growled and put her mouth over his head. Little pup head disappeared right into her mouth. My heart stopped. Please don't bite the pups head off while we have company! After a muffled pup yelp, her mouth opened and a startled Barry dropped to the ground. He backed up a step with a new look of respect on his snout for his Mamma. I pointed out to the new owner that was how to address a pup putting his mouth on a human. Pups have to be taught constantly and with serious consistency that they don't mouth humans. Say "NO" in a loud, stern voice and grab the pup by the back of the neck pinching hard and fast, while lifting the front feet of the floor. The combination of lack of balance and some quick release pain tells the pup this is not a good idea and he won't repeat too many times.
We do this from the very first time any of the little buggers put their first shiny new milk teeth needles on us. They learn quickly who and what is off limits. Distracting with a toy does not teach not to bite. It teaches to move to a new target but pup will be back as long as the possibility of a stolen nip with out correction is a possibility. A consistently, quick correction will curb the pups behavior. Pups are looking for a good time. They are true "party animals', just wanting to have fun in a puppy way. We have to teach them they must allow for our human frailty to get what they want.
Give them chew toys to relieve the pup tooth pain. And as a plus, chewing on a knucklebone will give them exercise and nutrients to help their ears stand up straight.
There are times in a pups life when we have to be firm in the way we correct. Dogs that think that they can get away with putting their mouth on a human can potentially become dangerous and unpredictable dogs that can end up suffering by losing their home.
Don't reward or replace these behaviors, FIRMLY but fairly correct.
 

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Guys, I've tried everything. He's very stubborn.. Very, I love him, but he starts biting my friends legs, or even mine (putting his WHOLE mouth) on us as if I'm a deer and biting and holding. I've tried re-directing him on a toy again but he doesn't CARE for the toy he just LOVES to bite us.

I've tried walking away and ending playtime, he doesn't care, instead he bites the nearest person near him, or finds a shoe somehow, he doesn't pay attention, and the moment I come back he continues to doing what he did.

We tried everything, none of it works.
And I've tried that training video that one of you linked me, I held my hand with treats in it and whenever he backed off when I said off, I treated him. He picked this up easily and nicely fast for a treat, but when the biting occurs on someone, and I say off and wait he will NOT release from their leg, or me.

He knows "sit" and "come" and his name, he does NOT respond to any commands unless he feels like it.

We excersie him everyday, and play with him all day. It doesn't help.
 

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NO no no " I know he's a puppy he's curious they're suppose to bite and they're called 'land sharks' for a reason "


they might , but they are not supposed to -- so QUIT this right now.


Dogs that are well socialized within their litter -- the right time and exposure to littermates and their DAM (which is often too little or too much) ---- and then shown what is expected - you are not a toy and you are not a playmate and you are not a victim (ouch?)
I don't like the advice on squealing or ouching - watch a litter with litter mates -- if there is too exuberant battle-play the recipient might squeak and then give the antagonist a good oh-yeah-take-this , and don't you being doing that to me again response .
If the recipient did not do this the antagonist would - what-a-wuss take some more of this -- and ramp up .


don't rile the dog up in frantic play where the dog is beyond capping
there is so much more to dog leadership than being a playmate
I do not rile him up, he does it randomly out of the blue and starts biting really hard and or follows somebody and goes for their legs. If you pet him he decides he wants to mouth and bite on your hand really hard, just from calmly petting him. (I never pet him from the face, by the way always his back)

I have tried the training video I was linked and taught him 'off' he doesn't go off UNLESS it's a toy, when it comes to your hands he forgets his training.
 

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Try a fairly large piece of fleece and tie a line to in so you can move it around with quick little jerks separated from your hands. Put a light leash on him with no handle that can drag around with him. before you even take him out of the crate, tease him with it. Keep it in sight as you open the crate and let him attack it. Holding the line and the leash, walk him outside and play with him with it. Make the fleece more interesting by tugging when he has it and jerking it around like its trying to get away when he doesn't have it. Use the leash to keep him from getting to you and tease him with the fleece, letting him get that.

Concentrate on doing only that for a while, no petting or affection for a while. No redirection, very directly to what you want him to bite. Pretty quickly he'll focus on that fleece, now you can correct him if he bites something else, lightly with the leash and combined with that, end the game. Now ending the game means something. Wait a minute and start again. You want to create some value for the fleece and show a clear distinction for whats not going to get him any satisfaction.
 

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Yes- what Steve said. Read his post a few times so you understand what he is saying to do and why.

Invite the puppy to play tug throughout the day. Make it tiring and super fun. Take him out of the crate and be ready to engage him in play. Devote a good ten minutes to fun tug. No huge rules, like outing or fetching, just focus on getting him excited about the toy and biting the toy. Drag it around on a string. Encourage it, praise him, then finish on a high note and put him in the crate after play so he can digest what happened.

Do not allow biting skin or clothes. You give him chance to fulfill that oral fixation to bite and tug on your terms. Make tug with the toy the best thing ever!

Maybe a pure sport trainer or PPD might do things differently but teeth on skin for any pet dog is a big nope. Teach it early.

Set him up to succeed. If your brother is over, show him how to play tug with the pup and be there to stop biting skin or clothes. It's not hard, pup is easy to physically manipulate. Be firm, fair and consistent. I do not tolerate "land shark" puppies. This sets them up to fail in future, in my opinion.
 

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Yes- what Steve said. Read his post a few times so you understand what he is saying to do and why.

Invite the puppy to play tug throughout the day. Make it tiring and super fun. Take him out of the crate and be ready to engage him in play. Devote a good ten minutes to fun tug. No huge rules, like outing or fetching, just focus on getting him excited about the toy and biting the toy. Drag it around on a string. Encourage it, praise him, then finish on a high note and put him in the crate after play so he can digest what happened.

Do not allow biting skin or clothes. You give him chance to fulfill that oral fixation to bite and tug on your terms. Make tug with the toy the best thing ever!

Maybe a pure sport trainer or PPD might do things differently but teeth on skin for any pet dog is a big nope. Teach it early.

Set him up to succeed. If your brother is over, show him how to play tug with the pup and be there to stop biting skin or clothes. It's not hard, pup is easy to physically manipulate. Be firm, fair and consistent. I do not tolerate "land shark" puppies. This sets them up to fail in future, in my opinion.
I do this all the time, but now he aims for biting my hand when playing tug, when my brother was playing tug with him, my brother is a very calm person and is never rough and plays gently, he also aims for his arm, bites and tries to jump to get at our hand.

I just tried the string thing, he's uninterested and only cares about my hand and legs still.

Sigh.. Should I just try to bond with him, and wait till he's 12 weeks he's 10 weeks now and rely on obedience school?
 

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NO no no " I know he's a puppy he's curious they're suppose to bite and they're called 'land sharks' for a reason "


they might , but they are not supposed to -- so QUIT this right now.


Dogs that are well socialized within their litter -- the right time and exposure to littermates and their DAM (which is often too little or too much) ---- and then shown what is expected - you are not a toy and you are not a playmate and you are not a victim (ouch?)
I don't like the advice on squealing or ouching - watch a litter with litter mates -- if there is too exuberant battle-play the recipient might squeak and then give the antagonist a good oh-yeah-take-this , and don't you being doing that to me again response .
If the recipient did not do this the antagonist would - what-a-wuss take some more of this -- and ramp up .


don't rile the dog up in frantic play where the dog is beyond capping
there is so much more to dog leadership than being a playmate
Carmspak, this was a really really good post. A lot of people unwittingly create bad behavior.
 
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