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Hey all!

This is my first post so forgive me if I seem a bit clueless.

We get our first GSD about 4 weeks ago (now three months old) and things are going okay. She's contracted Giardia, then a UTI because of the Giardia (our vet tells us). So, we know that internally she doesn't feel good and want to somewhat deferential regarding puppy behavior because of it. But, we also want to make sure we are laying the proper groundwork into adulthood.

That being said, her biting/nipping is non-stop. The second she is let out of her crate in the morning it begins. We've tried always providing a toy, walking away, saying ouch and high pitched yelps (only makes her more excited and bite a bit harder) all while being consistent with our "no bite" command. My most recent tactic is to either bring her or command her over to a "spot" and make her stay for 2-3 min. Do you think this could do the trick? I didn't want to crate her because she's doing really well in her crate at night (no crying or potty incidents). Any other thoughts on how I can manage this going forward?

Thanks!
 

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Apart from a firm "NO" and turning away, I can't offer much more to help. My boy (now 17 mths) still bites my ankles as I come into the yard from inside. It's his way of saying I want to play. I've been distracting him with his favorite toy, but I realise this is only a bandaid solution.
I'd love to hear how other have overcome this annoying mouthing habit.
 

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There are puppy biting topics pinned on the top of the puppy behavior section of the forum that might be a good place to research techniques.

Redirection to a toy is a great method. The puppy is young and doesn’t know better or understand our language yet. The ‘spot’ time might be good and is nice to tech impulse control but it doesn’t exactly show the puppy what to bite, which is what redirection does. I’m not sure what you are doing with the toy, but you want to make fast prey movements. The goal is to make the toy more interesting than the mobile human thing the puppy is biting.
I have also found the biting is directly proportional to tiredness. So make sure the pup is napping well.
 

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Redirecting onto a toy worked best for us.

Agis gets more hyped up if you react strongly, so calm interactions when he's nippy are best (now, at 8 months, we mostly just have this happen in play when it's not unwanted, but we still try to be fairly calm or it's less light).
 

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Research what his Mom did when he nipped her too sharply.
Pick him up by the loose skin under his neck and give a brief but firm shake side to side with a firm "No bite" while you look him in the eye and a redirection to an appropriate chew toy. No anger or raised voice is needed.

There's no reason why a GSD should be nipping/biting you past teething at the latest.
 

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Research what his Mom did when he nipped her too sharply.
Pick him up by the loose skin under his neck and give a brief but firm shake side to side with a firm "No bite" while you look him in the eye and a redirection to an appropriate chew toy. No anger or raised voice is needed.

There's no reason why a GSD should be nipping/biting you past teething at the latest.
I consistently redirect to a fun, floppy toy. They outgrow it.
Getting in a dogs face is never a good idea. Do that to the wrong animal and it will end badly.
Honestly a lot of the crazy biting can be avoided with structured play and consistent boundaries. Most of it is an invitation to play and interact. Bored puppies are hellions.
 

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Try redirecting his attention give him a chew toy,..,Mine would Nip and bite our legs and feet,especially toes! Cute at first, though gets very frustrating! I now use a water pistol,give him a shot and say NO! He backs down and stops! was good for a few weeks,no toe biting,he just started doing it again at 16 weeks,once again,water pistol and he backs off.
 

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I'm not saying that I didn't do a lot of redirection when my puppy was young, but ai also taught her to STOP!

And I meant it! Face it, you're trying to shape a puppy into the dog you want them to be! Do you always want to have to distract them in order to regain control???

**** that! Tell the dog, in no uncertain terms that this stuff doesn't work...done!

Stop beating around the bushes and handle it straight on!
 

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I'm not saying that I didn't do a lot of redirection when my puppy was young, but ai also taught her to STOP!

And I meant it! Face it, you're trying to shape a puppy into the dog you want them to be! Do you always want to have to distract them in order to regain control???

**** that! Tell the dog, in no uncertain terms that this stuff doesn't work...done!

Stop beating around the bushes and handle it straight on!
I like you Tim lol

Too many owners afraid of being firm with their dog's unacceptable habits and that's exactly how you get sooooo many owners still asking how to stop their pup from biting/barking/digging/not coming/aggressive with dogs/people etc months and months later. Too many people wanting to be their dog's playmate instead of Leader.

*EDIT: They do the same with children with predictable results. ;)

Proper rest, exercise, mental stimulation, play, socialization, nutrition, redirection, yes....but correction!

Why is your pup still biting you months later? Because you let it.:ROFLMAO:
 

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Good luck. Mine just turned 6mo, finally lost all of his milk teeth, and the mouthing has slowed a lot. The habit/muscle memory is still there when he gets worked up, but 'no' is finally carrying some weight and he'll stop after a a soft "bite".

The first 6 months sucked....nothing worked. Nothing. Redirection, no!, yelping, etc. just got him more amped up. There was, and still is, a lot of crate time when he can't be reasoned with.

Hes a Euro blood WL, breeder selected him for me due to "less drive"....holy ****, I wouldn't want to see 'high drive'.

Hang in there, ignore it and redirect as best as you can. I'm sorry in advance for your ripped clothes and bloody hands.
 

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Ahh geez so I have at least 2 more months of this? Yikes! Been crating him more often lately when he is uncontrollable,I hate dong it but I have no other choice,he doesnt friggin listen! Thanks for the response,best a luck to ya!
 

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Hey all!

This is my first post so forgive me if I seem a bit clueless.

We get our first GSD about 4 weeks ago (now three months old) and things are going okay. She's contracted Giardia, then a UTI because of the Giardia (our vet tells us). So, we know that internally she doesn't feel good and want to somewhat deferential regarding puppy behavior because of it. But, we also want to make sure we are laying the proper groundwork into adulthood.

That being said, her biting/nipping is non-stop. The second she is let out of her crate in the morning it begins. We've tried always providing a toy, walking away, saying ouch and high pitched yelps (only makes her more excited and bite a bit harder) all while being consistent with our "no bite" command. My most recent tactic is to either bring her or command her over to a "spot" and make her stay for 2-3 min. Do you think this could do the trick? I didn't want to crate her because she's doing really whe scrate at night (no crying or potty incidents). Any other thoughts on how I can manage this going forward?

Thanks!
I've done the toy, ignoring her, pushing her away, yelping, playing the sound of a real puppy yelping and it never seemed like it would it. She would go in her crate if she got to excited and I would push my hand or arm further back in her mouth when she would bite me. Made her stop. Also praised her when she did stop bitting. She has gotten so much better. I no longer look like an abuse victim.
 

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I know we always try to solve the biting in a positive-for-us way. In the past with a 4 month old pup, I was greeted with a puncture wound to my upper leg. I That hurt! And in a reflex I cursed, yelled and grabbed him by the neck. Didn't have time to think of a strategy but it was the last time he ever bit me. I would never have done this in a conscious state of mind but it does show that he had an impulse control button.
 

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Ahh geez so I have at least 2 more months of this? Yikes! Been crating him more often lately when he is uncontrollable,I hate dong it but I have no other choice,he doesnt friggin listen! Thanks for the response,best a luck to ya!
Doesn't have to be but it sounds like you want to listen to those that say you have wait a few more months and then a few more months instead of those who say you don't lol:unsure:
 

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I'm not saying that I didn't do a lot of redirection when my puppy was young, but ai also taught her to STOP!

And I meant it! Face it, you're trying to shape a puppy into the dog you want them to be! Do you always want to have to distract them in order to regain control???

**** that! Tell the dog, in no uncertain terms that this stuff doesn't work...done!

Stop beating around the bushes and handle it straight on!
Missed this post. Good stuff Tim.
 

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Doesn't have to be but it sounds like you want to listen to those that say you have wait a few more months and then a few more months instead of those who say you don't lol:unsure:
More good stuff!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
First off, I'd like to thank everyone for their advice. This website has been a saving grace to my wife and I.

Madison, now at 5.5 months, is doing much better. She is still teething, but by the looks of it she's almost through that stage. Nowadays, the only time she mouths or "bites" our hand is when she gets picked up from daycare or the groomers. Basically, whenever we leave her anywhere for an extended period of time and gets overly excited to see us. She also loves to talk/whine for 5 minutes after we pick her up too. That though I feel is a product of being a quarantine dog, and us barely ever leaving the house. But even then, it's nominal and not nearly as nippy as before. It's definitely more mouthing than nipping. And, our "no" or "no bite" command with a slight correction has much more of an affect on her than it did a few months back.

It has also been nice to see that Madison's behavior is not out of the ordinary. As first-time puppy owners, it helps us get through times where we think we've gone horribly wrong somewhere and don't know how. Again, thank you to everyone. Now on to the forums that will teach us proper walking techniques, and also how to begin a raw diet.
 
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