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Hey all!

This is my first post so forgive me if I seem a bit clueless.

We get our first GSD about 4 weeks ago (now three months old) and things are going okay. She's contracted Giardia, then a UTI because of the Giardia (our vet tells us). So, we know that internally she doesn't feel good and want to somewhat deferential regarding puppy behavior because of it. But, we also want to make sure we are laying the proper groundwork into adulthood.

That being said, her biting/nipping is non-stop. The second she is let out of her crate in the morning it begins. We've tried always providing a toy, walking away, saying ouch and high pitched yelps (only makes her more excited and bite a bit harder) all while being consistent with our "no bite" command. My most recent tactic is to either bring her or command her over to a "spot" and make her stay for 2-3 min. Do you think this could do the trick? I didn't want to crate her because she's doing really well in her crate at night (no crying or potty incidents). Any other thoughts on how I can manage this going forward?

Thanks!
 

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Apart from a firm "NO" and turning away, I can't offer much more to help. My boy (now 17 mths) still bites my ankles as I come into the yard from inside. It's his way of saying I want to play. I've been distracting him with his favorite toy, but I realise this is only a bandaid solution.
I'd love to hear how other have overcome this annoying mouthing habit.
 

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There are puppy biting topics pinned on the top of the puppy behavior section of the forum that might be a good place to research techniques.

Redirection to a toy is a great method. The puppy is young and doesn’t know better or understand our language yet. The ‘spot’ time might be good and is nice to tech impulse control but it doesn’t exactly show the puppy what to bite, which is what redirection does. I’m not sure what you are doing with the toy, but you want to make fast prey movements. The goal is to make the toy more interesting than the mobile human thing the puppy is biting.
I have also found the biting is directly proportional to tiredness. So make sure the pup is napping well.
 

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Redirecting onto a toy worked best for us.

Agis gets more hyped up if you react strongly, so calm interactions when he's nippy are best (now, at 8 months, we mostly just have this happen in play when it's not unwanted, but we still try to be fairly calm or it's less light).
 

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Research what his Mom did when he nipped her too sharply.
Pick him up by the loose skin under his neck and give a brief but firm shake side to side with a firm "No bite" while you look him in the eye and a redirection to an appropriate chew toy. No anger or raised voice is needed.

There's no reason why a GSD should be nipping/biting you past teething at the latest.
 

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Research what his Mom did when he nipped her too sharply.
Pick him up by the loose skin under his neck and give a brief but firm shake side to side with a firm "No bite" while you look him in the eye and a redirection to an appropriate chew toy. No anger or raised voice is needed.

There's no reason why a GSD should be nipping/biting you past teething at the latest.
I consistently redirect to a fun, floppy toy. They outgrow it.
Getting in a dogs face is never a good idea. Do that to the wrong animal and it will end badly.
Honestly a lot of the crazy biting can be avoided with structured play and consistent boundaries. Most of it is an invitation to play and interact. Bored puppies are hellions.
 
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