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In order to stop muzzle biting is it okay to grab the muzzle gently and hold his mouth closed for 5-10 seconds? I was told this is a good way to teach the puppy to not bite. The theory is that redirecting with a bone or toy is rewarding for biting. We tried redirecting and muzzle hold and the hold works better but I want to make sure I’m not engraining anything bad into my puppy by doing this technique
 

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Instead of thinking of redirecting as a reward, think of it as teaching and learning what is appropriate to do. It may take a while but it should get easier the more consistent you are with it.
 

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I was lucky with Katsu - I got her at 4 months because the breeder held her back for a SAR home (only to change her mind on it later). She came crate trained, and didn’t not landshark me.

She did, however, chew on things I’d prefer she didn’t. I did ge redirection method. “No” or “Uh-uh” for the thing I didn’t want her chewing on, offer something okay to chew on, and a “yes!” When she took it. It seemed to work pretty well with my Shiba Inu when he was younger.
 

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There's nothing wrong with making a puppy uncomfortable when it wants to chew on a human.I don't think it's a good idea to grab them though.You don't want them to avoid your hands and begin ducking away from a touch.
What I have done successfully is to make a fist and push (gently!!)into puppy's mouth until he backs away and lets go voluntarily.I don't say a word to him,just let him learn by natural consequence that biting causes discomfort.As soon as he lets go animate a toy for him to chew and praise!And yeah,puppy slobber on your hands is the downside,lol:)
 
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I tried grabbing the muzzle when Kai was younger, but it would only piss him off and make him try and bite me more, therefore I've always attempted to redirect instead. Just my experience.
 

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Teach the No Bite command.
 

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you'll have to find what works for you but ill say that with one of mine we did grab the muzzle and hold his mouth closed, at first he would try to bite right after we let go to let us know he didnt like that then i just grabbed it again for attempting to bite me. then after a few times he learned not to and we no longer have that problem.
 

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I prefer a scruff grab. When you grab the pup's muzzle it often elicits more biting, kinda of like what they would do with a litter mate. The scruff (or side of the neck; usually easier to reach) grab says in no uncertain terms that this is a behavior you don't agree with. This is exactly what mom would do, and puppies are conditioned to understand it as a disciplinary action. Some pups will immediately submit; some might immediately repeat the action as if to say, "Is this what you don't want me to do?" You then have to respond with another, stronger grab, maybe a little shake to say, "Yep. Don't do it again."



Expect the puppy to forget this lesson, especially during excitement, so be prepared to address it each and every time.
 

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In order to stop muzzle biting is it okay to grab the muzzle gently and hold his mouth closed for 5-10 seconds? I was told this is a good way to teach the puppy to not bite. The theory is that redirecting with a bone or toy is rewarding for biting. We tried redirecting and muzzle hold and the hold works better but I want to make sure I’m not engraining anything bad into my puppy by doing this technique
No! Grabbing the muzzle is something that I would never do to a puppy. Not sure who gave you that advice, but it is really and advice. With most dogs it will make the behavior worse. It will undermine your relationship and cause trust issues.

Also, we are not dogs. I am not a mother to my dogs, so I do not act like a dog that has a litter of puppies nor treat them in the same way. I would not grab a dog by the scruff of the neck and shake either. For the dogs I have owned and raised from puppies, high drive working line GSD's they would react more aggressively from that type of treatment.

Simply stay calm, don't make any quick motions and give the puppy something appropriate to bite or chew on. Puppies do this when they are teething, give the dog something acceptable to bite then reward and praise when it is biting the toy, rag or tug that you gave it. Behaviors that are reinforced are likely to reoccur.

My hands are for praising and petting only with my dogs. I never hit, shake or grab my dogs for punishment. I find staying calm, having patience and rewarding the correct behavior works wonders.
 

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Also, we are not dogs. I am not a mother to my dogs, so I do not act like a dog that has a litter of puppies nor treat them in the same way. I would not grab a dog by the scruff of the neck and shake either. For the dogs I have owned and raised from puppies, high drive working line GSD's they would react more aggressively from that type of treatment. s.


I'm not a mother to my dog. I am the boss.:) And underlings do not put their mouths on the boss or the other humans in the boss's house.



Personally, I want my dogs to be bite inhibited; they are imposing enough especially when people see how well-trained they are. If people ask if my dogs bite I say, "Only when they're supposed to." ;-)



Your mileage may vary~
 

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I'm not a mother to my dog. I am the boss.:) And underlings do not put their mouths on the boss or the other humans in the boss's house.



Personally, I want my dogs to be bite inhibited; they are imposing enough especially when people see how well-trained they are. If people ask if my dogs bite I say, "Only when they're supposed to." ;-)



Your mileage may vary~
I'm more of a benevolent dictator, than a boss. I don't teach bite inhibition to puppies, mainly because I do bite work with my dogs. The dogs I raise from puppies don not put their teeth on me, if they do it's a puppy thing and I redirect. Once, they are older I have not had a problem. It is easy to teach a dog who is in charge and who can and can not be bit. I can do that with out limiting bite inhibition.

Now, I have an older dog that I got at 3 1/2 who is a Dutch Shepherd and a real beast. Teaching him that biting me or coming up the leash took some time and a lot of patience. This dog is more than imposing and a very serious dog. He is not bite inhibited, quite the opposite. He just doesn't want to bite me and that is what I want.

It is just a mindset, philosophy and matter of raising and training dogs. I deal with very strong, serious dogs on a daily basis. Puppies are puppies and little concern to me if they bite. I just give them something appropriate to bite and move on. I stay very calm, rarely lose my cool even with adult dogs and reward the proper behavior. It works for me. More people should try it.
 
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