German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just got a new puppy back before Christmas, and I have an older dog. My older dog is socialized, has not always been an only dog (we have a cat, and when we got my older dog (Tanis) as a puppy we had another dog), and has always had some other animal in the house with him. I'm having some issues with getting these two to get along. The puppy will run right up to him and want to play, but he tends to growl, snarl, and if she's too pushy, he'll nip at her backside. She'll run off and that's all that happens, he goes on his way. She, however, always comes back. I've started using a leash when we are outside so I can control how close she gets, but I'm a little worried about this type of socialization with the two of them. I don't want her thinking this is how she should act with every dog she sees. They do have good moments, such as in the Jeep when she was in her crate, he had his own space, and they were laying against each other through the crate. Or right now she is in her playpen and he is laying just outside of it with her laying inside of it watching him.

I know he has to lay the ground rules for her, but how much should I allow? I've heard that I should allow no more than a nip, and I've heard that I should not even allow that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
always give the older dog attention FIRST when the two are together . Always feed the older dog first . the older dog gets EVERYTHING first . You dont want the older dog to feel like its position in your "pack" is being challenged by a newcomer .

JMHO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts
Without actually witnessing their interaction, it sounds like he is correcting her which is normal.
Puppies can be pushy and inappropriate and older dogs will correct them for that behavior.
Raising a puppy around another well balanced, well behaved dog is very beneficial.

I had my 19 week old pup at our training facility last night for a "lesson" with another well balanced dog. She is currently being raised with 3 other dogs and has done well but she can be very pushy with toys. My problem here is that none of the other dogs will push back. They have allowed her to win and she is now to the point that she will get aggressive with other dogs when there are toys present.
But during her "lesson" she received a quick correction from the other dog which put her in her place. She came back once more and with another correction she began to play appropriately. Today she is back with my other dogs and is playing appropriately again.

So other dogs can be beneficial, but I cannot say that is was is definitely happening in your situation without actually seeing the interaction. If I get a chance, I will try and upload video of our lesson last night and show you how it looks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
I got Saber 3 weeks ago. Speedy is a nonGSD, 12 years old, and the first 2 days he did a lot of snarling and snapping at her (not actually biting) which, I think, was him letting her know he was NOT a puppy and she was NOT to jump on him or take his stuff. He is little and he could be seriously hurt by a GSD pouncing on him. Anyway, she got the message, he is top dog. Now they get along wonderfully, no snarling or snapping needed. She play bounces at him and they play "chase" (he chases her) but she doesn't jump ON him. They wag tails and seem to really like each other now.

So, my advice, if there is not actual biting going on, let them work out the pecking order a bit with a watchful eye. If you start correcting the older dog all the time he may get resentful and never really like the pup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Without actually witnessing their interaction, it sounds like he is correcting her which is normal.
Puppies can be pushy and inappropriate and older dogs will correct them for that behavior.
Raising a puppy around another well balanced, well behaved dog is very beneficial.

I had my 19 week old pup at our training facility last night for a "lesson" with another well balanced dog. She is currently being raised with 3 other dogs and has done well but she can be very pushy with toys. My problem here is that none of the other dogs will push back. They have allowed her to win and she is now to the point that she will get aggressive with other dogs when there are toys present.
But during her "lesson" she received a quick correction from the other dog which put her in her place. She came back once more and with another correction she began to play appropriately. Today she is back with my other dogs and is playing appropriately again.

So other dogs can be beneficial, but I cannot say that is was is definitely happening in your situation without actually seeing the interaction. If I get a chance, I will try and upload video of our lesson last night and show you how it looks.
They eat seperately. His food is kept out all day and he just nibbles at it through out the day. She does not have access to his food (I dont' want her eating food designed for an adult dog). He is not actively chasing her down, and he doesn't go off on her just because she is near him. Honestly, there are quite a few barks and growls before the nip comes out, and he does not chase after her. My main concern was the nip. He doesn't do that often, only once so far, and she headed for the hills. Of course, she came back...He's not being aggressive toward her, he is curious of her, and if she isn't making noise, he'll search her out to find out why. Both of them were at PetSmart with me sunday and someone else with a German Shepherd barked at Alexandra. Tanis took offense to that. For her first vet visit I scheduled Tanis for a visit too. He had to be taken out of the room for something or other, and when he came back his first concern was the puppy. With that I am certain that he considers her part of the pack, but my previous dogs were very playful breeds (labs mainly) and took right to any puppy I brought in. Of course, this puppy is VERY energetic and younger than any other puppy I've had before, even Tanis, so maybe it's just a youth thing I'm not use to seeing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
We have a 13 or 14 year old GSD female and just got a 7 month old male puppy. Most of the time they are appropriate but he has so much energy. We cannot be everywhere to monitor them ( I am always in the room but maybe too far off to get him.) I keep a small water bottle in case he starts escalating in a way that is not good. I spray him a slight amount and it cools his jets and distracts him. When I move for the water bottle when he does something he knows he's not supposed to do he looks at me to see I am reaching for it or not. May not work for all but seems to keep him in line when he is not in my near reach...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Dealing with that right now. I have 2 older dogs, both 5, one male one female. Tanna (female) is taking on the "mom" role by growling and keeping 8 week old Cree (GSD) in line, Wyatt (Border Collie) is the goofy big brother. I was fearful Tanna would never accept Cree, but in the 3 days shes been home I think it will work out fine. They all need a week or two to sort the newness of it all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Just wanted to update this. She tries to lick his muzzle now, and he's not as cranky with her unless she starts to get too pushy. I've taken to letting him out to go to the bathroom, bringing him in, letting her out to use the bathroom, then playing with her until she's really tired. I then bring him out and it's less of an issue.

He also goes to her crate first thing in the morning to check on her, and they sniff at each other and she licks him through the crate. Getting better, but she's still a little too wound up for him. He's never been a wound up type of dog, but it seems to be settling a bit.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top