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how do you "pick" a puppy from breeder who resides in another state? I'm relying on her weekly updates on their personality development...I'm not familiar with the type of questions to ask.. should I be concerned with an outgoing versus a more reserved personality...? and how much does a puppy typically weigh at 3 to 8 weeks..?
 

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Well our pups at 3 wks old weighed 15 lbs and probably 25 lbs now at 6 weeks of age. Sylby what do you plan on doing with the GSD that you bought? This depends on what going to be done with him/her schutzhund, or our is it going to be just a pet. If he/she is just going to be a pet I feel that it shouldn't so high drive. Is the breeder picking out your pup for you? If so he needs to know what your plans are for this pup.
 

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i'm thinking that usually you first tell the breeder about your lifestyle and what your hopes are for your puppy and what kinds of things you'd like to be able to do with your dog when he/she grows up, and the breeder chooses the best puppy for you. it's been my experience that the more experienced and ethical the breeder, the more likely it is that it will work this way.
 

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3-8 weeks is a big range to ask for weight.

My dog was tiny. At 6 weeks she only weighed 10 pounds (she was considered the runt). Now at 9.5 months she is almost 70 pounds. I really need to update my pictures.
 

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IMO, its a bad idea for customers to pick their puppy. Even if you can visit the pups on a regular basis as they grow, any decision would be made on a very, very limited amout of information. This is even more true if you're relying on emails and photos.

The breeder, who presumably is familiar with the bloodlines and parents, is experienced in interpreting puppy behavior, and who lives with the pups day in and day out for several weeks, is the person who should be matching puppies to future owners. No one is going to be able to understand the pup's individual personalities like the breeder. I would be very, very leary of a breeder who lets people pick their own pups. Especially without ever spending time with them.

Yes, you should be concerned with a "reserved" puppy. This isn't a good sign and can indicate a shy personality and weak nerves. Pups should be bold and outgoing.
 

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I do agree 95% with Chris....and picking pups from photos is insane and nothing more that BYB/commericalism/marketing...it is pure BS!

It takes a lot of studying of a litter to understand a "reserved" puppy - it is NOT necessarily bad, but for a novice to discern if it is really a strong, aloof pup or a nervy one is not realistic. I had one aloof pup, he was not afraid of anyone, just did not seek being petted - he would walk right up to someone, sniff them and walk away - people would try to pet him all the time, and once in a while he would really warm up to someone, but most people he ignored...not a problem. Helpers who tested him really liked him.

Lee
 

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My pup is aloof but not timid. He aclimates to new things super fast but just isn't into being petted, especially by strangers. He just doesn't see what the boxer gets so excited about.

My breeder picked my boy. When I went to pick him up and saw the whole litter I honestly would have picked to others before him.

After a little over a month home this pup is so perfect for us that it makes me feel God had a hand. We are all just too happy.
 

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Originally Posted By: Wolfstraum
It takes a lot of studying of a litter to understand a "reserved" puppy - it is NOT necessarily bad, but for a novice to discern if it is really a strong, aloof pup or a nervy one is not realistic. I had one aloof pup, he was not afraid of anyone, just did not seek being petted - he would walk right up to someone, sniff them and walk away - people would try to pet him all the time, and once in a while he would really warm up to someone, but most people he ignored...not a problem. Helpers who tested him really liked him.
True, I was just trying to keep it simple and avoid complicating things further with talking about the exceptions.


In reality more "reserved" pups are that way due to nerve and confidence issues, not other reasons. It takes some experience to tell the difference, and it definitely takes first hand observing of the pups over a significant period of time.

Since it sounds like the poster may not have the experience to tell the difference, and even if she does she can't based upon photos and emails, better to err on the side of caution and focus on the "outgoing" pups.
 

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Originally Posted By: EmooreDefinately tell the breeder what you want and let him/her pick the pup for you.
But also make sure the breeder is experienced in this, and willing to do so.

And be very upfront with the breeder on what your goals, expectations and preferences are with regards to the pup. The breeder should really work to get to know you and your lifestyle and your plans, as this information is imperative for them to pick out the right puppy for you.
 

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I agree that the OP should get a happy outgoing puppy.

But we must be careful with generalizing too much or being less specific because reserved is NOT timid...timid is timid. Reserved is not a negative, a timid pup will back away or shrink away from contact, a reserved pup ignores contact but is not fearful. There is a distinct difference IMO and it needs to be clear to a novice that alot of people will pass off timidity/fear as "reserved" or "aloof".

Lee
 

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Delta is the first dog that I have ever acquired by not seeing and handling first. We talked at length with the breeder, describing what we wanted in a dog ( i.e. our lifestyle). Many of my friends thought we were nuts but I must say Delta is everything we could have ever wanted in a dog. If you are comfortable with your breeder I have come to the conclusion that they can pick better for you......at least that has been my experience.

Pam
 

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Wolfstraum ........I am currently looking at GSD pups and found your explanation of reserved / timid to be interchanged by the novice or inexperienced GSD owner or possible GSD owner ( like me ) Thanks for the clarification and will chose my words more wisely now.....and make sure breeders also know what I want and be more specific in the type of puppy I am looking for. That could be a major factor in determiningg the right puppy from the litter. Thanks again.
John
 

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Texoma
The trick is to find the right breeder one that you completely trust. As many on this forum will attest that is no easy task. Some take years to find the right breeder.

I have owned German Shepherds for over 40 years and have trusted a breeder to pick a pup for me and it didn't turn out well at all luckly I was able to return the pup and get my money back.

My advise to you is to work with the breeder picking your puppy and definitly visit the kennel. In my book that is an absolute must.

Now a day's German Shepherds are a very expensive proposition.
You need to protect yourself as much as possible.
Most breeders now have puppy contracts make sure you have in that contract that you can return the pup for a full refund if you are not 100% satisified in 72 hours.
Make sure you read that puppy contract very carefully before you sign it.

Both Chris Wild and Wolfstraum are breeders and might have a different view on tjhis matter.

Buying a puppy should be a 2 way street between the buyer and the breeder not the breeder telling you the way they want things to proceed.
 

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That is an excellant book. The Monks of New Skete do an excellant job with their breeding program. Last summer I visited their monestary in New York state
 

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I read it before I got Dante, I wish I had read Purely Positive by Sheila Booth instead.
Just my experience and $0.02
 
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