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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

One of my puppies (3 months old) is continuously picking on the youngest puppy ( 7 weeks old).
Not sure what to do :frown2:

any advice?
 

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Both GSD's? Usually the three month old will no just how hard to play with a younger pup. They can kind of sense it. If no one is getting hurt, they teach each other bite inhibition. Just limit the play time. The younger one needs a break.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks!
Yes, I'm there to breakup when they start playing too rough or they youngest starts yelling.
During the day, they stay separated from time to time with gates but they keep looking for each other to keep playing :laugh2:
I guess GSDs know how to deal with themselves but I cannot avoid to worry a little :smile2:

The little guy is the one in my avatar 0:)
 

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GSD's don't really know how to deal with themselves.

The 3 month is just playing but the size difference is to much. Keep them separated. You can allow them to play but monitor.

Also keep them separated and work with them so they bond to you and not each other. Two puppies at a time is never recommended.
 

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Too rough of play can teach your puppies poor social skills. If your puppies have different play styles, one can wind up being bullied all the time which can lead to undesirable behaviors such as anxiety, fear, or even aggression. When they are older, rough play can easily escalate into something serious. Unless you know that either dog is being fair and appropriate with corrections, it is best to discourage the behavior and handle it yourself.
 

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GSD's don't really know how to deal with themselves.

The 3 month is just playing but the size difference is to much. Keep them separated. You can allow them to play but monitor.

Also keep them separated and work with them so they bond to you and not each other. Two puppies at a time is never recommended.
Totally agree. The young of any social animal is raised by older animals in some sort of a social structure. We remove puppies from litters and moms so we can bond with them and make them part of our family. So we must take on the roll of teaching them how to act AND not putting them in situations where they can't know how or can't do the right thing. Older puppies, younger puppies, strange adults (dogs) with new puppies...these are situations where the animal is going to impulsively do whatver it impulsively feels like and one may be hurt or bullied or develop social problems for life.

There is no place in nature that I am aware of where babies of one animal are plunked wih older babies or adults unrelated where things just work out ok.
 

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Both GSD's? Usually the three month old will no just how hard to play with a younger pup. They can kind of sense it. If no one is getting hurt, they teach each other bite inhibition. Just limit the play time. The younger one needs a break.
Bad advice; one (the 3 month old) can become being a bully and the other one can develop dog aggression.
It is unnatural with this age difference to grow up together. Keep them separate until they are more equal. What are their genders? If they are same sex, you could very well have more issues to deal with.
OP, listen to the others who replied.
 

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Hello OP!!


I am in no position to give sound advice but wanted to share a recent experience that may be somewhat related ( or may be totally unrelated)... In this scenario it was Josie (GSD) picking on/being rough on Haylie (JRT).



We have a 10 year old Jack Russell Terrier and Josie was 9 weeks old when we brought her home. Somewhere along the they way I thought the right thing to do was to let them ‘figure things out’ and thought that allowing her to play, sometimes rough, with Haylie (our Jack Russell) would teach her manners, reading cues and bite inhibition. When Haylie used to bark real hard or try to nip her, Josie would back off. Flash forward Josie recently turned 1 year old and just a few weeks ago things escalated with Haylie being injured one day and the next day (with me ) a trip to urgent care for a dog bite with animal control involved and a 10 day home quarantine.
 

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Bad advice; one (the 3 month old) can become being a bully and the other one can develop dog aggression.
It is unnatural with this age difference to grow up together. Keep them separate until they are more equal. What are their genders? If they are same sex, you could very well have more issues to deal with.
OP, listen to the others who replied.
Ok you are right Wolfy Dog, I didn't see the video of how they are playing. I suggested monitoring the play time as other have suggested. But I guess the key word from the OP is "picking" on. From my experience with my dogs and puppies I have been around, I never had a bully. YOU ARE SO RIGHT!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Bad advice; one (the 3 month old) can become being a bully and the other one can develop dog aggression.
It is unnatural with this age difference to grow up together. Keep them separate until they are more equal. What are their genders? If they are same sex, you could very well have more issues to deal with.
OP, listen to the others who replied.
Female (older one), male (youngest)
 

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My adult dog has had puppies and *still* doesn't know how to properly play with them. She was trying to "play" with a 7-week-old heeler puppy a few weeks ago and kept smacking it with her paw, totally bowling it over each time, and I'm pretty sure she just had no idea what she was doing wasn't appropriate for that small a pup. That's how she instigates play--smacks dogs with her paw. The poor heeler puppy hated it. We put an end to the "play" immediately.
 
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