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i'm sure this question has been asked before, but i didn't find a thread on it. can someone point me to that thread?

i've been using a no-pull training harness which "mostly" works, but when i take him off the harness and back to a regular collar he starts pulling again :( my next method will be with a pinch collar, but if there's a better training technique that i can learn and apply, i'd rather do that

thanks!
 

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Whenever he starts pulling, just stop. And say something like "no pulling". Continue only after he releases pressure (which might take a time). Don't correct him more than "no pulling", just wait, he has to release pressure on his own will.

At first it will be frustrating. Because it won't work. And he will pull again and again and again. And you will stop and stop and stop. Just remember that you are not going on a walk, but having an training session.

It might take like 3 days with 1 hour walk/day. It won't be perfect, but it gets easier after 3 days, even if he pulls, he will release pressure instantly and you continue your walk. Once he fully gets it, you will never need any special collars again (which don't work anyway, as you already found out).

You can train him with standard flat collar.
 

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thanks Andy!

i have successfully used a pinch collar in the past, using the exact method you have described with a flat collar, so a pinch collar can work. i'd just like to not use one if i don't have to.

i am using the stop-sit-walk method with the no-pull training harness when he pulls too hard. for just "a little pull" i let the no-pull training harness do it's job, but too hard a pull and we sit until i say "let's go"
 

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I personally don't like using a harness to teach a dog not to pull, but that's just me. If it's working for you go for it! I currently use a training collar that has short plastic prongs, but in the past have taught the same thing with choke collars or slip leads or even flat collars. What matters most is looking at teaching the dog or puppy how to walk nicely, not getting somewhere. Patience and repititions are what work!
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong but pinch collar is prong collar yes? I've had my share of collars with my pup (going on 12 months). At 8 weeks he had a regular collar, which was ok until he'd gotten bigger and started pulling.

And then I had the harness (always on the front clip. Use back clip only for pulling eg. When you're rollerblading/skating and he's supposed to pull you), which of course worked since he is UNABLE to pull when he has it on the front clip. But him being unable to pull doesn't mean he won't, so the front clip harness is NOT training, just a tool to MAKE him not pull, instead of TEACHING.

So I did some research and landed on choke collar. Worked quite wonderfully during 'no pull' training. Put it all the way up in the neck behind the ears (Cesar Millan style), and he will understand that if he pulls, he chokes. That's what I have him on now, almost at all times. Still use the harness sometimes when we're hiking or at the beach, hiking sometimes I want him to pull me as we go uphill (hahhha) and at the beach / crowded public places like malls and stuff, just as a precaution if anything happens I can pull him with the handle on the harness.

I experimented on Prong collar too. Nope. Doesn't work (I've had a trainer showed me how to do it properly). Still doesn't work. He just pulls and pulls and pulls and doesn't even stop him from jumping. So no prongs for me. I know some people like using it and it DOES work for a lot of dogs and owners. Just not me and my boy. Plus personally it just looks uncomfortable so I opted it out.

Try the choke collar, honestly.

And also, just a suggestion, when we had one of our sessions with the trainer and my boy pulls, I kept saying 'No pull! No pull!' out trainer corrected me and said, 'Don't tell him what NOT TO DO. Tell him WHAT TO DO. Like, Heel! Instead of No pull!' Makes a lot of sense to me. Not only does he NOT pull, he now HEELS.

Here's a picture of my boy with his choke collar. (size 22", boy's neck is 19" at the moment). He's wearing a tutu. Ignore it. It's the only photo I can find right now lol.

Give it a go.
 

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I prefer the prong collar. You know it doesn't hurt too badly when a dog pulls against it anyhow but it is annoying and does remind my dogs not to pull too hard. I've had a choke collar that I used with a ridgie mix. Although I don't recommend them, it did work with her. 98% of the time it hung loose around her neck. Once she figured out how uncomfortable choking was all I had to do was slide it up near her chin and she heeled beautifully. She was a great dog and wanted to please. Although she was heeling it was more like a child asking mom not to count to 3! It wasn't because she liked heeling with me.

With all training, McGloomy hit the nail on the head. If you tell a dog NO, you should follow it with a YES. No, don't pull, Yes, heel, good. No, don't lunge, Yes, sit, good (works with kids too). Sometimes you'll hear this concept called No-Po-Po. (No Positive Positive) People like to come up with labels for everything.
 

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thanks Andy!

i have successfully used a pinch collar in the past, using the exact method you have described with a flat collar, so a pinch collar can work. i'd just like to not use one if i don't have to.

i am using the stop-sit-walk method with the no-pull training harness when he pulls too hard. for just "a little pull" i let the no-pull training harness do it's job, but too hard a pull and we sit until i say "let's go"
I don't think that these collars works. 0:)

With that collar dogs doesn't pull simply because it causes pain or it can't breathe. And you wrote it yourself. GSDs aren't stupid. Once you switch to flat collar, they are back to pulling. This type of collars doesn't teach not to pull by using respect to the owner. It just temporarily stops pulling. If dog goes through this type of training, once you take off leash, he will take off to the woods or something. Dog doesn't respect owner on a leash (respect the pain), why should he respect off the leash... . Collars doesn't teach not to pull.

But if you take a time and teach him not to pull on a flat collar due to respect to you, you will have more obedient (&happy) dog. And everything will be more easier (recall etc.).

Not a professional, just my approach, opinion.
 

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I have had luck with a Gentle Leader with my previous dogs. My GSD is a little too young to use one and he is always trying to be right at my heals.

I've also heard that the answer to pulling is to stop deliberately and turn around and go the other way.
 

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Instead of trying different collars have you tried training the "heel" position yet? I have found great training videos on YouTube for heel.

I think Mei was 12 weeks when I started training heel. I literally was training heel almost every day for at least 20-30 minutes. I started short distances first, like 100m then eventually around the block. Before I started training it, she would pull a lot like you're mentioning.

Have a lot of high reward treats and a lot of patience and your pup will get it!
 

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Instead of trying different collars have you tried training the "heel" position yet? I have found great training videos on YouTube for heel.

I think Mei was 12 weeks when I started training heel. I literally was training heel almost every day for at least 20-30 minutes. I started short distances first, like 100m then eventually around the block. Before I started training it, she would pull a lot like you're mentioning.

Have a lot of high reward treats and a lot of patience and your pup will get it!

20-30 minutes is a long time! are you talking about a focused heel or a loose leash heel? Either ones takes a lot of stamina :wink2:
But you are correct that practicing it a little every day and not allowing the pup to pull you around does pay off.
 

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20-30 minutes is a long time! are you talking about a focused heel or a loose leash heel? Either ones takes a lot of stamina :wink2:
But you are correct that practicing it a little every day and not allowing the pup to pull you around does pay off.
So, I took her for an off-leash (draggin on the ground) on the route I did heel and it took 8 minutes LOL. Maybe it felt like it took longer because I was giving her treats/training heel and what not. Maybe that is why it felt long before.

But yes, practicing when she was a little younger sure did help out where we are now! Now, I'm noticing I just have to say her name and she tightens it up quick.

Good luck OP!!! The time spent practicing every day or so sure does pay off.
 

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I have had luck with a Gentle Leader with my previous dogs. My GSD is a little too young to use one and he is always trying to be right at my heals.
We had a vet suggest a gentle leader once, we bought one and our dog at the time figured out if she let slack on it she could get ahold of the little leash off the side and she would turn around with it clamped in her mouth and pull us that way. Also I've read that it can be bad for the dogs.
 

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i'm sure this question has been asked before, but i didn't find a thread on it. can someone point me to that thread?

i've been using a no-pull training harness which "mostly" works, but when i take him off the harness and back to a regular collar he starts pulling again :( my next method will be with a pinch collar, but if there's a better training technique that i can learn and apply, i'd rather do that

thanks!

You aren't training your dog, he is just learning to read equipment.


Best method I have ever found for established or determined pullers is Koehler's. Even huskies stop pulling with it. But seriously, no equipment will make up for a lack of training. It sounds like you are expecting your dog to just figure it out and that is not going to happen. There are multiple free videos on line demonstrating heeling and loose leash walking.
 

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I did foster to transport dog rescue for 25 years. The dogs stayed only 2 to 4 weeks with me and all left walking on lead without pulling, crate trained and housebroken. These are displaced dogs, trying to figure out what's up and I had to accomplish these goals in the kindest fashion possible. I can count on one hand how many were puppies or under 40 lbs. Most were wild bucks that had never even had a collar on, nonetheless a lead. I used the about face method mentioned earlier. If the dog got ahead of me but not yet pulling, I simply turned to the right and headed in the opposite direction. There were some that had me so dizzy, I was walking drunk, but it works. Simon, my GSD was just as crazy (if not more so) than any of the rescues that I had with me. He learned very quickly to walk next to me or there was a surprise turnabout. I had two other foster GSDs and both of them learned much faster than most of the other breeds/mixes. They are pretty darn smart. I use a martingale only because a slipped collar could be disastrous but a flat collar would work just as well.
 

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I made up a game with Rumo which is like "Red Light, Green Light."

If he pulls, it's Red Light and I stop moving.
If the leash is loose between us, it's Green Light and I walk ahead briskly.

Anyway he got it in a handful of walks and is basically nice to walk now**
Thinking of it like our "Game" kept it from being like, "Don't pull! Bad dog!" and "Owner vs Dog" conflict.


**In "normal conditions". This excludes seeing running cats, deer, and rabbits.... **
 

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. . . If the dog got ahead of me but not yet pulling, I simply turned to the right and headed in the opposite direction. There were some that had me so dizzy, I was walking drunk, but it works. Simon, my GSD was just as crazy (if not more so) than any of the rescues that I had with me. He learned very quickly to walk next to me or there was a surprise turnabout. . . .
Oh, god I wished this work for my pup. Trying this now after the method of stopping each time she pulled was a fail. Leash walking is my only morning exercise for her before I go to work, I've already missed two trains and can't get up any earlier (currently getting up at 4:30AM). At some point I just have to get back to the house which is counter productive.
 

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Exactly. So if you don't have the time to make sure the pup does right, it's best to save the training for a day off. If you just head back home without getting the results you want, you are showing that you will eventually give up. It'll be a battle each and every time you walk and nobody wants that. Breathe.
 
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