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Hey everyone! I've had my puppy(almost 10 weeks old) a full week now and have been taking in as much information as I can about what's expected of me as a new owner etc. to make her life the best it can be.

I'm trying to set up/find a training schedule that has worked well for all of you more experienced parents. I know every dog is different when it comes to how fast they learn etc, so this might not be possible. Basically trying to find a schedule that fits her age. What should I work on first and once that's completed where do I move on from there.

So far I've been teaching her the basic sit, down, and come, which I was amazed at how fast she picked them up. I've also been teaching her to wait until I release her before she runs out of her crate. Any advice would be appreciated.

If someone with experience training would like to mentor me that'd be great.
 

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I work on basic manners - no jumping, no begging, no trampling over people to get out the door/down the stairs first. Sit. Wait. Come. Down. All as the opportunity arises.
Feeding time is also a good time to work on sit (or down) and "wait" commands.
I really don't follow a sit schedule on what I teach when or in what order.
 

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I believe I just explored my pup's new world with her for the first couple weeks......outside, inside, in the vehicle not going anywhere at times and other times taking a short trek in the truck with her and showing her off to friends and family. I recall spending time teaching them their names and playing hide and seek games once they had a bit of confidence in their new surroundings.....something I did to make the recall stronger as time passed by. I think I just spent those first couple of weeks initiating the bond and keeping it lots of fun with minimal expectations...heck they're just little Tasmanian Devil babies at that age .....

SuperG
 

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I work on basic manners - no jumping, no begging, no trampling over people to get out the door/down the stairs first. Sit. Wait. Come. Down. All as the opportunity arises.
Feeding time is also a good time to work on sit (or down) and "wait" commands.
I really don't follow a sit schedule on what I teach when or in what order.
Yeah I make her sit before I open a door or feed her etc.



I believe I just explored my pup's new world with her for the first couple weeks......outside, inside, in the vehicle not going anywhere at times and other times taking a short trek in the truck with her and showing her off to friends and family. I recall spending time teaching them their names and playing hide and seek games once they had a bit of confidence in their new surroundings.....something I did to make the recall stronger as time passed by. I think I just spent those first couple of weeks initiating the bond and keeping it lots of fun with minimal expectations...heck they're just little Tasmanian Devil babies at that age .....

SuperG
Yeah I haven't taken her anywhere because i'm scared she'll get parvo if I introduce her to too many places. So i'm waiting for the rest of her vaccinations.
 

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You don't want to wait too long, and how to do that and avoid Parvo is tricky. We did take our pups out and about before the last vaccination. Parvo could be brought home on your shoes, so even keeping your pup home is not fool proof. That being said, no need to take chances and going someplace frequented by many dogs. A ride in the car to look out the windows would be nice.

As far as a schedule goes, it will be changing a lot the next few months. For house breaking I took the dogs out before they needed to, sometimes setting a timer. Once they got better at Holding It, they went out as they felt it was needed. My boy used to grab a shoe and bring it to me to tell me it was time for a walk. My gal sits on a step near the front door. Both pace as if doing the pee pee dance if I ignore their hints.

Walks start off short and frequent. Now my grown boy gets at least a three mile walk most days and the pup is up to a mile and a half. They both get to run around and wrestle in the yard.

remember pups NEED their naps. If a human toddler gets over tired they get cranky and whine. Puppies, over tired, get rowdy and nippy.

Your Sit, Stay, and Walk Near Me are all important. Some sort of Drop It command is important right now. Pups will put all kinds of wrong things in their mouths. Make Recall, which little pups are good at, something very positive.
 

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You don't want to wait too long, and how to do that and avoid Parvo is tricky. We did take our pups out and about before the last vaccination. Parvo could be brought home on your shoes, so even keeping your pup home is not fool proof. That being said, no need to take chances and going someplace frequented by many dogs. A ride in the car to look out the windows would be nice.

As far as a schedule goes, it will be changing a lot the next few months. For house breaking I took the dogs out before they needed to, sometimes setting a timer. Once they got better at Holding It, they went out as they felt it was needed. My boy used to grab a shoe and bring it to me to tell me it was time for a walk. My gal sits on a step near the front door. Both pace as if doing the pee pee dance if I ignore their hints.

Walks start off short and frequent. Now my grown boy gets at least a three mile walk most days and the pup is up to a mile and a half. They both get to run around and wrestle in the yard.

remember pups NEED their naps. If a human toddler gets over tired they get cranky and whine. Puppies, over tired, get rowdy and nippy.

Your Sit, Stay, and Walk Near Me are all important. Some sort of Drop It command is important right now. Pups will put all kinds of wrong things in their mouths. Make Recall, which little pups are good at, something very positive.

Thanks for all of the great advice. For house breaking I just keep her with me at all times. The only time she gets a little freedom without constant supervision is right after she gets done going to the bathroom. Otherwise i'm normally playing/working with her.

I haven't thought about teaching her the drop it command. What would be a good way of doing so? I guess I could introduce the command during fetch when she returns the tennis ball.

Also what is the common way of making her stay by my side at all times. Is it the same as teaching "heel"?
 

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Also what is the common way of making her stay by my side at all times. Is it the same as teaching "heel"?
The heel command can mean different things to different people. I expect my dogs to walk politely with me on leash and have specific criteria that I've trained for a loose leash walk, but I really don't use "heel" because it's not as strict as what is usually meant - dog's head in line with the seam of your pants, either with or without constant focus on you.

I take my dogs out for long leashed hikes on paved paths and dirt trails at a nearby regional park, which can vary from 3-10 miles. To me, it's not realistic to expect a perfect tight heel for hours on end, especially with them paying attention to me the entire time. This is supposed to be enjoyable for them too!

I start out with a young puppy off leash around the house. I lure with a treat, I teach them to target my hand, which they can then follow. I do quick turns in both directions, having them stop and sit whenever I stop (I train the sit by luring the head up with a treat, marking and giving the treat when puppy's butt hits the ground). I do it both inside and outside in the dog run, which is a long narrow area down the side of the house.

I don't have a training schedule for puppies, but I do spend a lot of time working with them. It's really more of a list of things that I work on in no particular order, usually several at once. A technique I really like is called "capturing" behaviors, which is basically catching your dog doing something on their own and rewarding them for it. So rather than asking my puppy to do something when it has no idea what the word means yet, I wait until puppy does it on her own (such as "down"), and then I mark it, either verbally ("yes!") or with a clicker, and toss a treat. The more I reinforce that behavior, the more the puppy offers it up, and then I can begin to name it, putting it on cue. This works great for sits and downs, eye contact (the "watch" or "look") command, and coming towards me ("come").

Halo came home at 10 weeks old and started puppy class 3 weeks later. She was pretty distracted that first week, but by week #2 she did so well that after class one of the other women came up to me and asked how I got her to focus on me like that. :) At that point I had spent so much time rewarding her for eye contact that she would sit or lay down and stare at me, hoping to get a treat, lol. Since you can't teach your puppy anything unless you first have her attention, that's one of the most important things you can work on.

I love this game for teaching impulse control, and it's totally appropriate for young puppies. I spent some time every day doing this with Halo, using part of her lunch kibble. I added eye contact too, so she had to back away from the food in my hand and look at me, but I worked up to that:

 
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I haven't thought about teaching her the drop it command. What would be a good way of doing so? I guess I could introduce the command during fetch when she returns the tennis ball.

Also what is the common way of making her stay by my side at all times. Is it the same as teaching "heel"?
For the drop it, I simply said our command word...Phooey... and removed the item from their mouth. As a young pup they accepted this and learned quickly that Phooey meant something was NOT for the mouth. frequently but not always, I had a treat to replace the dropped item.

For fetch it is different. The item needs to be released but can be retaken. We use the German word Aus for that. And we almost always make it a positive experience. for instance, one ball is dropped and it is immediately tossed again...or a second ball is tossed to chase. If it is a tug toy, right after the release we tease them into another bite. The last Out / Aus the toy is replaced with a chewy treat.

for loose leash walking, it is trickier. My boy was harder to teach this to than my gal. My boy wanted to forge ahead and play with other dogs and chase the squirrel, and if he bit the leash it meant he was bored so we did some obedience drills along the way. Rewards were bits of Red Barn rolls or a Ball on a string. He loved that. Eventually we had to take a class where he could get used to working near other dogs without expecting to play with them. And we use a prong collar (make sure to get good advice if you go that way...and hold off until at least six months)
My gal likes walking near me, so once she reached six months I swapped from a harness to a collar and she does great. Of course, having our big boy to play with, she is less prone to want to play with strange dogs.
 

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I don't have a training schedule for puppies, but I do spend a lot of time working with them. It's really more of a list of things that I work on in no particular order, usually several at once. A technique I really like is called "capturing" behaviors, which is basically catching your dog doing something on their own and rewarding them for it. So rather than asking my puppy to do something when it has no idea what the word means yet, I wait until puppy does it on her own (such as "down"), and then I mark it, either verbally ("yes!") or with a clicker, and toss a treat. The more I reinforce that behavior, the more the puppy offers it up, and then I can begin to name it, putting it on cue. This works great for sits and downs, eye contact (the "watch" or "look") command, and coming towards me ("come").

Halo came home at 10 weeks old and started puppy class 3 weeks later. She was pretty distracted that first week, but by week #2 she did so well that after class one of the other women came up to me and asked how I got her to focus on me like that. :) At that point I had spent so much time rewarding her for eye contact that she would sit or lay down and stare at me, hoping to get a treat, lol. Since you can't teach your puppy anything unless you first have her attention, that's one of the most important things you can work on.

I love this game for teaching impulse control, and it's totally appropriate for young puppies. I spent some time every day doing this with Halo, using part of her lunch kibble. I added eye contact too, so she had to back away from the food in my hand and look at me, but I worked up to that:



For the drop it, I simply said our command word...Phooey... and removed the item from their mouth. As a young pup they accepted this and learned quickly that Phooey meant something was NOT for the mouth. frequently but not always, I had a treat to replace the dropped item.

Alright thanks! I'll add those things to the list of what needs to be worked on. I did some of the impulse exercises today and she caught on quickly =P
 
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