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I think it is good to put the dogs out there for all to see.
It is hard to keep our eyes every where. If not for "plea" postings I would not have known about little Fresno. That was a save accomplished by this entire board.

I would feel worse if a dog was in my area, and I did not know it, and it was PTS, and I has room.
 

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I think Paula makes a great point. I remember on one occasion crossposting a dog and connecting with a rescue that was only 40 minutes away - who did not know that the shelter he was at existed! They did not have room for him, but they began working with that shelter as a result.

I would like to add that I don't know what anyone else's inbox looks like, but I get at least two or three pleas a day that make "Can someone help this dog please??" look like complete indifference.

They are messages that say:

<span style='font-size: 14pt'><span style="color: #FF0000">IF WE DON"T GET ENOUGH DONATIONS THIS DOG WILL DIE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! </span></span>

Sometimes I can help. Many times I can't. That's part of life.

dd
 

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I agree with many postings, that the Urgent section is important and yes, even though I said that sometimes I walk away feeling guilty (really, really, heartbroken) and wonder- how many more of these dogs can be saved if all the people asking, would just foster ONE? BUT- I know that not everyone is able to do so, and that sometimes its just my own emotions making me think those things. SO, Yes, bumping, pleading, making it personal is important because sometimes that is what we need to see to make it really hit home.
 

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I've seen situations in my area where the line between overload and hoarding gets very blurry. Where the volunteer is at every adoption event with multiple dogs and is actively placing the dogs who come to the events trying to get the numbers down. But then there are the 4-5 per year, usually ones that have become ill and required extended TLC to bring them back to health, who somehow never make it onto Petfinder or to the adoption events. Then you've got someone who is actively doing rescue but, at least in my eyes, is also actively collecting dogs. And this will be the person who, when there's some emergency, will be the only one to step up and volunteer to fit just one more in. What then?

Yes, and wasn't there the nice lady (you and some longtimers know who I'm talking about) a couple years ago who pulled lots of GSD's from MAS, bc she wanted to help and felt pressured by those" help him" pleas - who had no one else step up to the plate to help- and she also was later accused of hoarding and insanitary conditions and those same people who pleaded for help (and who's dogs she saved, mind you!) shunned her and badmouthed her. That's what you get, for giving in and taking "just one more".

Yes, those pleas do more harm then good, IMO. I know lots of dogs who were pulled without even a proper temp-test (and turned out aggressive), just bc people felt pressured to help. Those emotional pleas are one of the reasons I rarely post on urgent thread anymore.
 

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Quote: I've seen situations in my area where the line between overload and hoarding gets very blurry. Where the volunteer is at every adoption event with multiple dogs and is actively placing the dogs who come to the events trying to get the numbers down. But then there are the 4-5 per year, usually ones that have become ill and required extended TLC to bring them back to health, who somehow never make it onto Petfinder or to the adoption events. Then you've got someone who is actively doing rescue but, at least in my eyes, is also actively collecting dogs. And this will be the person who, when there's some emergency, will be the only one to step up and volunteer to fit just one more in. What then?
I think that this question is actually being addressed in many of the governance threads that have been begun - because it's a governance and oversight issue. A good rescue will have an intake coordinator who decides which dogs get pulled and which foster they go to (this may be two roles in the organisation) so you don't have people pulling dogs ad hoc without being clear on the fact that 1. There is room in the rescue. 2. There are adequate resources within the rescue to provide that dog with whatever he needs, be it medically, training-wise or what have you.

dd
 

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Also why it is important to release dogs to rescues or adopters, and less to the private rescuers. Granted, I have pulled a dog on my own once and luckily found a home for Lady, but I would not do it again. You really need a rescue's support and approval for this, unless you are independently wealthy and can afford to care for the dog properly.
 

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Yes!! And I really believe it is the one-person rescue that is more likely to get overwhelmed, not only due to lack of resources, but because there is no sounding board in place to provide a wider perspective.

dd
 

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I can't think of one reputable rescue that I have worked with, in the real world and face to face, that uses highly emotional language in either their internal communications or in their communications with shelters or other rescues.
Paula, when you communicate with the folks up in Washington, do you lay it on thick and use words like "he is pleading for his life here", "she is fighting hard to live, can you say no to those begging eyes"?
Look, I am not suggesting that people stop making posts that bring emotion into play. Just as someone said yesterday, it is emotional work and you can't help but be moved by the plight of these dogs. But I do think, and a lot of people agree with me here, that this emotionally pressured language has gotten out of control and is ruining the rescue forum here.
Why can't people just bump and comment that that dog is tugging at them? Why the over kill?
I am not pointing the finger at any member here in particular with this next statement. But I think it needs to be said, so I'll say it. Using the tactics of a used car salesman is the work of an amateur. Ask anyone who has been actually doing rescue for a while (and I am again talking about the people that are actually in the trenches and doing the work), and they will tell you that using that kind of over the top, pressured language is what an amateur does.
Maedchen, I stopped posting in the rescue threads for the same reason. As have others. You aren't alone.
Sheilah
 

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i have to agree with sheilah here. i've been following this thread w/interest, b/c for me, when i was doing cat rescue heavily and making (feral) intake decisions - emotion had nothing to do with it. i didn't have time for emotion, i was too busy.
 

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I tend to agree. My concern is that if seasoned rescuers aren't swayed by emotional language (and I agree that by and large they aren't - I do think it adds to the heavy guilt burden we all already walk around with but it's unlikely to push us to take that particular dog) then the people it does sway are those newer to rescue and/or those most at risk of becoming overwhelmed because they can't say no and want to save them all - which is precisely what we want to avoid.

And I guess, as I mentioned before, I do sometimes get cranky about being asked to do things by people who won't do them themselves. Bumping or talking about that person's affection for the dog doesn't bother me at all - it's the "please! Why won't someone do something?" stuff that gets me. But leaving my occasional curmudgeoniness aside...


My take is that the highly emotional language can be dangerous to the dogs and isn't probably the best thing although I recognize the sincere and admirable intentions of the posters.

Where I think that kind of language can be a great asset is in the posting of pleas for contributions from the wider dog owning world (not the rescue community) and in getting the word out to the public that pet overpopulation is real and that wonderful dogs die every day.

Perhaps posters could partner with rescues to do some kind of networking? I'm going to talk to Rosa about some of these ideas and perhaps others might benefit from partnerships as well.
 

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Originally Posted By: pupresqI tend to agree. My concern is that if seasoned rescuers aren't swayed by emotional language (and I agree that by and large they aren't - I do think it adds to the heavy guilt burden we all already walk around with but it's unlikely to push us to take that particular dog) then the people it does sway are those newer to rescue and/or those most at risk of becoming overwhelmed because they can't say no and want to save them all - which is precisely what we want to avoid.
Ah. Now this makes sense to me. I wasn't seeing how hard it could be for people new to rescue to read that and not fall for it. I was new once. Still am, really. But now I remember seeing people post things like that somewhere, and we all look at it thinking "Newbie!".

Thank you.
 

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I had not planned on posting here at all and I did not post on the other thread either.

But I have to say I first "met" Sheilah (Sit,Stay) on line on this board in the urgent rescue section. I had just moved out here from Kentucky and she was looking for a transport for a GSD out of Oregon to her place in Idaho. I answered and we had arranged to get it set up for me to pick the dog up in Portlannd and meet her near the Idaho border with it. Turns out her husband had to make a trip that way so he drove extra hours to get thei GSD and bought it all the way from around Salem to Boise, Idaho. That is a long drive.

I was marginally involved in rescue in KY and did some transport, shelter pulling and short temr foster work for Brightstar. I have not done that in a while as this is a very isolated area for rescue. I help locally where I can.

Those activily in the trenches have my respect. I think many make excellent points about this issue on both sides of the fence.
 

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I just wanted to make sure my post was clear.

I was only trying to state that the urgent section is a tool for dogs that might be unseen to a rescuer that is close by.
I usualy look at the area to see if I am close enough to offer any assistance. I do not really read the personal comments.

I would not have known about Fresno if not for the post.
My intent is not to justify the content of the posts, but that I feel the section has value. : )
 

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Hi, Kathy! That was Ziggy. I can't even remember now what little town he came out of in Oregon. I took Tanner through a puppy kindergarten class and Ziggy's parents were in the same class with Ziggy's little brother, a Golden named Gilby. Anyway, back to the subject at hand...
I don't think anyone believes that the rescue threads don't do a lot for many dogs. Bringing these dogs to the attention of a wider audience can only be a good thing.
Paula, I couldn't agree with you more. The section has huge value. I have never said that the rescue threads shouldn't be there. What I have said, and will continue to say, is that the language that some posters use has gotten out of hand. The emotional over kill of the pleas for someone to "look into those eyes and find it in your heart to make room for just one more" is not doing the dog any favors.
That is what I have a problem with. Someone said that using that language makes them feel like they have done their part, makes them feel better. Okay. Great. But it doesn't do the dog any good. In fact, in the long run, it could be causing a great deal of harm. You are turning off the very people that you want to attract.
Rescue isn't only about making yourself feel good. It is about helping how and where you can. I think I would feel better if I were to stand in the parking lot at animal control, yelling abuse and foul language at the people there to surrender their pets. So, I feel better after having done it, but are the animals better off?
I support these rescue threads with all my heart. But there has to be some accountability in their use.
I really appreciate the fact that some members have come forward and posted their agreement with me. Maybe if enough people speak up, consistently, then behavior will change.
Sheilah
 

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I read the threads daily...I'm still here. I get emails by the hundreds pleading.....I don't only read this stuff here. I am also on tons of other forums...all pleading. I'm still reading...I'm still rescuing...I'm still there...
 

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In fact I have a dog at my feet that was on the gas list in GA for the next day. Not from this forum and not a GSD. Its like the kid that saw all starfish and was throwing them back in the ocean an old man approached and said son you cannot make difference and as the little boy threw a starfish in the ocean he replied I made a difference in this ones life. So maybe if you make a difference in just one dogs life it is worth it......
 
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