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I have a 2year old intact male working line sable german shepherd. I'm thinking of adopting a 4year old sable male shepherd who IS neutered. What do you think? Good idea? Bad idea? Pros? Cons? We haven't met the dog yet, we are waiting to setup a time for us all to get together. My main concern is territorial issues I guess. My dog now is great with other dogs, but I've heard sometimes an intact male can be a target for neutered males to fight over alpha...I've never had 2 dogs at a time before. So any advice/opinions are welcomed :)...the dog we're thinking of adopting is a rescue. He's 4, has an enzyme issue and needs a special powder with his food every meal. He's supposedly really great with people, kids, other dogs, etc and was surrendered because the owner had a disabled child and the dog wasn't getting the proper treatment for his enzyme (they neglected to use the powder all the time due to money issues) and the dog didn't get the time/attention it deserved.
 

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Do a meet and greet with the dogs on neutral ground, possibly a couple times if you're able. IME, males tend to do better with each other than females meeting females. Really depends on the dogs in the end though.
 

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Thanks KZoppa. How do you tell if the dogs are playing or being aggressive? I know there can be a very thin line there...what should I look for when they meet?
 

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Thanks KZoppa. How do you tell if the dogs are playing or being aggressive? I know there can be a very thin line there...what should I look for when they meet?
Its a thin line and things may escalate when you bring the dog home. To be on the safe side, make preparations to keep them separated if necessary. That means extra room or space for the new dog and a crate, (or crate and rotate). Keep toys and food (bones, etc.) separate for each dog. Don't create situations where they may compete for the same things. Don't feed them together.
One good exercise after you get the new dog, is walking them both (each on one side).
 
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