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I have a 4 yr old male GSD who I purchased when he was 3.5m old. When I meet up with the owner I immediately noticed he wasn't in the best of health he looked sad and somewhat thin. I should have known better, the owner was sketchy but I was young dumb and really wanted a dog. I felt bad about this pups situation. I purchased him for $500 and received his AKC papers work in the mail.

When I brought him home he was timid but became very attached to me that same day. I immediately noticed aggression issues when ANYONE would get near me. I attempted to correct this and socialize him but he absolutely hated other people. He was VERY large for his age and would bark aggressively at anyone who would approach me. It was hard to believe he was only 3.5m and I wouldn't have believed it if wasnt for his baby teeth coming out.

I was worried and tried everything I could to socialize but nothing worked. His owner kept him and his parents in a fenced yard so they never saw anyone else. 3 weeks later I received his AKC paperwork along with his family tree. The paperwork honestly didn't mean anything to me as I loved him and he became my bestfriend. At first I overlooked the paper work and it wasn't until he was around 6m that I started to look at his family tree (his aggression towards others had grown during this time).
I was shocked to find his parents AND his grandparents where both SIBILINGS. It honestly made me feel terrible and explained to me why he had such aggressive behavior towards everyone. He's never shown ANY aggression towards me and I absolutely love him. He eventually came around to tolerating my brother after months of being around him. He was a liability and became so aggressive I couldn't bring him around other people. I'm certain this didn't help but I was truly scared he would hurt someone as he began to lung at others.
He's know 4yrs old and unfortunately there's been several circumstances in my life that I'm no longer able to care for myself and much less him. It pains me to think I haven't been able to spend to with him as I would before. I'm in college now and facing financial and health issues to the point where a family member had to take him in. He's been with this other person for 6 months now and I know he's not getting the life he deserves. He's locked up all day. I'm lost and I'm huriting because I can't care for him and I don't know what to do. I'm hoping I could find a GSD sanctuary that could take him in. I feel absolutely terrible about having to even think about this but I don't know what else to do. I'm not sure it would even be a possibility as he is VERY aggressive. I'm not sure if anyones has had any experiences with dogs whose paent where sibilings. He doesn't have any visible deformities that would indicate inbreeding. I love my friend please help any advise would be appreciated.
 

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Well, someone needs to answer you. The chances of you finding a nice place for a very aggressive 4 year old dog are slim. The people that could handle him very likely don't want to. The places that want him, well you just don't want your best friend there.
I would say work with a trainer, because the dog needs training not socializing, but it sounds like that may not be an option.
So make an appointment, take him and you out for the best day ever, and then put him down.
Sorry. I have no better answers.
 

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I really don't like stories like these as they break my heart. I have to agree with Sabis mom. It's awful for you to read a response like this I'm sure. The reality is you can't care for him and you shouldn't expect anyone to be willing to take on such a difficult challenge and liability. Please believe me, we here on the forum don't take the position of euthanizing an otherwise healthy dog lightly. But the facts are you aren't likely to find anyone willing to take him and give him any good quality of life. Even your friend that is caring for him "keeps locked up all day". That's not a good life and will actually just make his aggression worse. I'm very sorry you are in such a tough situation at such a young age. Adult decisions can be very hard.
 

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What do you mean by locked up all day? In a backyard? Basement? Garage? Crate? In a house?
 

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While I tend to agree with Sabi, I am not putting that final stamp on something based on an internet post. IF a trainer isnt and option and it sounds like it isn't- please call a GSD Rescue that will come evaluate the dog and at least tell you to put him down based on actually meeting him.

Can you share the pedigree? Sorry you are dealing with this :(
 

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No reputable breed rescue will be interested in knowingly taking on a dangerous, human-aggressive dog. Most of us place good dogs in regular pet homes--there are no "magic" homes waiting to fix dogs like this in the rescue world.

IMHO, it's also not a rescue's job to tell you to put him down. The responsible thing would be to pay a trainer for an evaluation, or else ask a vet who already knows the dog. With a 4 year old, he's surely had some vet visits where you talked to the vet about behavior challenges, right? How about calling your regular vet and asking for an opinion? I know of several vets who are very, very honest about this stuff -- a couple of my friends have told owners with fixable dogs in bad situations to just sign the dog over to the clinic, and they'll find a suitable placement, while also telling people with dangerous dogs to please put the dog down. In these cases, they knew the dogs and the owners pretty well to be able to distinguish that which was caused by the owner's inexperience, lack of structure, and absent follow-through from that which was a dangerous, genetic flaw making the dog unsuitable as a pet. That phone call to ask the dog's regular vet for advice probably wouldn't cost you anything, if you've got a decent relationship stretching back 4 years.
 

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Agree with Magwart on this 100%. Get the dog evaluated by a trainer at a minimum. Then make decisions- one of which could be to get your life to a place you can keep this dog. He's made it to 4 years without a bite incident- seems like maybe things aren't as bad as they seem? Plenty of GSD are reactive.
 

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Call the breeder, ask if they will take the dog back. If they won't they won't. Is the dog neutered? I would probably neuter the dog before sending it back to the breeder. If they are sketchy, then you don't want the dog bred. On the other hand, you love the dog, and even if the breeder is going to use the dog for breeding, it is better than being dead. Sometimes people think a dog is very aggressive, that is really very scared. They look about the same. A very aggressive dog in any hands can be very dangerous. A scared dog in inexperienced hands can be more scared and more of a liability, that same dog in the hands of an experienced person, that is not be subjected to uncomfortable situations, might be just fine, in that situation.

I the breeder will not take the puppy back, and you cannot provide for your dog, and your dog is dangerous, then you need to do the right thing, and that would be putting the dog down at the vet. Rehoming an aggressive dog shouldn't be an option.
 

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Well..at least he hasn't bitten anyone.

I know there are training academy's that board your dog and train him for a month or so. Have you looked into any of them? It sure would be a shame to separate for such a devoted dog.
 

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"I purchased him for $500 and received his AKC papers work in the mail."
I'll go out on a limb and assume this isn't the type of breeder that takes dogs back forever. But yes, contacting the breeder first is always on your should do list.

"I'm in college now and facing financial and health issues to the point where a family member had to take him in"
People in this situation GENERALLY don't have money for a board and train, or a private trainer.

Calling a breed specific rescue and having an in person meet/greet/powow is probably the closest this person can get to a skilled eval. And no it isn't a rescues responsibility to tell someone to put a dog down, but especially a breed specific one WILL have an interest in saving a dog that may have trainable or manageable behaviors that the current owner may not realize is trainable and manageable. Nobody here reading a post can tell what is really going on.

I once met and evaluated an "aggressive"GSD that was labeled as such because he attacked a small dog in the house, and then the shelter would not put him on the adoption floor because he was "exhibiting concerning behavior". His concerning behavior was excited gentle mouthing and vocalizing because he was being let out of his kennel, and tug/ball drive. He misdirected sometimes and got your hand. Dog was actually social, happy to play tug with a new person, and was aloof towards other dogs at the shelter passing by. He was also handler searching. It was heartbreaking. His name was Zues, he is probably dead because people who don't understand the breed misdescribed things. He didnt get adopted by the potential home we had (I was going to pull for the rescue) because the vet at the shelter said his hips looked (edited to correct info) "ok" on Xray but did feel loose when they moved them around. They xrayed during a neuter at the potential adopters request. What are the chances a shelter vet used proper postioning during a casual xray during a neuter or knew how to evaluate socket tightness manually ? MMMM..not very good. The dog was about 3 and had beautiful movement. Shame.

If I have learned nothing over the last 2.5 years in being more personally involved with the breed, is never believe what you are told by just anyone, believe what you see or what known skilled people tell you.
 

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My neighbor told me that they returned their labradoodle pup because he was getting too "Aggressive". When we talked about it, she said he was jumping up and biting their clothing, biting their hands, and he had ripped her jeans. To me, that's typical untrained big puppy behavior.? But I don't think she believed me. They returned their "Aggressive" pup (several months old) to the breeder.

I'm not saying OP's dog is not dangerous!! He could very well be a very scary dog!
But agree that it's best for "Aggressive" behavior be seen/checked in person.
 

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OP here it certainly has been difficult these past few months. I'm looking into taking to the vet to see if neutering my help his behavior. For those of you asking yes he has demonstrated aggressive behavior towards other people ever since he was a pup. As he grew we could no longer trust him around as he began to lunge at people. There's has been many situations where we have had close friends come over in an attempt to socialize him and he goes crazy anytime anyone get near me or him. It's very scary as I would hate it if he were to bite someone and be forced to out him down. A couple of months ago I was visiting him, he currently stays in a 10x15 ft large HEAVY DUTY kennel inside a fenced backyard. Well I was putting him back in the kennel when my brothers pitbull ran outside the house and playfully jumped on me as I was closing the kennel. My dog went crazy and managed to push the kennel door as I was closing it and attacked him. He bite my brother's dog and wouldn't let go until I managed to calm him down after 3 mins. Luckily my brothers dog wasn't seriously hurt but I'm sure had I not been there he would have most certainly killed him. Ever since then I've grown increasingly worried of what might happen if he gets out. I love him so much and know he was just trying to protect me but for a moment I was almost scared of him. As I was calming him down I could feel his growl and strength. He is very VERY strong at 100lbs. I'm lost about what to do but I'm going to do some research about neutering him. Thank you so much for taking the time to respond.
 

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This sounds less of a an inbreeding issue and more of a socialization issue starting with the breeders. Puppies need to get used to people being around them to help prevent this. However at this point he's 4 now and almost half way through his life.I doubt many would want to take this dog in but maybe, just maybe you might find someone willing to take the risk. Best odds are to find a way to take care of him yourself and I wouldn't put too much hope in changing his personality imho.
 

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The dog can live in a 10'x15' kennel until you are finished with college. I doubt very much that he would have attacked the pit if you weren't there. That sounded like resource guarding, and you were the resource. He saw the pit bull trying to get attention from HIS person. I would suggest to the brother that he ensure the pit bull is inside when he goes out to care for your dog. If you finish college in 2-3 years, the dog may still have 4-6 good years as your best buddy. You can manage such a dog, by waking at night, using a muzzle, and so forth.

My brother's dog was 3 years old when his partner died. He could not manage the rent on his own, and my parents let him move back in with them, but would not allow him to bring the dog. Jazzy did not get along with my 2 year old bitch. We had WWIII at my house one day, and all three of us were in the ER. They were jealous of attention I was giving, the bitches HATED each other, would have killed each other. Jazzy stayed outside in a kennel for two years. It did not hurt her at all. When my brother finished school and bought a house he came and took Jazzy home. She lived in the house with him, and loved the cats, and when I came over, she ADORED me. She lived to be over 13. And, my brother didn't bother to visit her when she was at my house. She was his dog though and very bonded to him. It's a temporary arrangement.

Neutering can make a difference Dogs have testosterone and like other male animals, if you remove the hormones, it can alter some behaviors. Neutering WITH an increase in exercise, leadership, and training would do best, but you are not in a position to do all of that now. But keeping him in the kennel at your brothers is better than putting the dog down. It's harder on you than the dog because you see the dog through a human filter.

How committed are you to the dog. If you are willing to buy the dog's food, and do something in return for your brother, it's a workable solution.
 

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Have you sought help from a trainer familiar with the working breed? That is step #1 and should have been step #1 the day you experienced issue. More than half of the times that I've seen a dog labeled "aggressive" for myself, the problem is 50% or more due to the way the owner reacts to the dog's behavior or lack of proper guidance to the dog that further exacerbate a fearful or willful dog. The longer it's allowed to live like this, the worse it gets. The dog is in a state of anxiety when it acts out, it's a terrible state to let the dog remain in that state of mind all these years. When you don't nip it when it first arise, it will only get worse. If your dog is truly as bad as you've described, it's not a dog that a reputable rescue will take in.
 

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OP - before putting the doggo down, check with a breed specific rescue in your state. Don't know where you are, but if anywhere near the Louisville, KY area you might contact Tier Haven. They are a GSD rescue and have been in the rescue business since the 90s. They have a few people who work with behavior issues. If you're not nearby, maybe check to see if there is a similar organization near you. At least maybe they could evaluate your dog and see there's any hope.
 

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I tend to agree with Selzer's advice. If you decide to take it, our experience with our previous shepherd might help dealing with the situation long term. Our previous GSD turned about as aggressive as yours is at about a year old. Neutering helped a little, but not all that much. In neutral territory (like the vet's office) he was generally fine, but in the house or on the streets where I habitually walked him ('his territory') if a person or a dog came withing 20 feet my wife used to jokingly say that "he would eat them soon as look at them." With his family and friends, he was a 95 lb lapdog. The aggressiveness never changed enough even after neutering and training to make him trustworthy and for 10+ years (he died of DM and even the last 2 years of his life with him in a hip sling didn't change the behavior all that much) walks with him were a constant zig-zig of street crossings to avoid other people and dogs. What we did learn is that we could acclimate him to new people inside the house by muzzling him and letting him slowly get acclimated to the new person on his own terms as long as the new person was willing to put up with up to a few minutes of seriously vicious sounding barking in the beginning. Keeping him under control could eliminate the barking, but didn't let him come to terms with the new person, so letting him acclimate on his own terms was the only option that we found to work. After a little while he would quiet down because the barking was having no effect and he couldn't do much more than bark. Eventually he would approach the person and sniff them and then ignore them. After a further while, when he approached again and if he allowed it then the person might pet him, which would happen eventually. After an hour or 2 of this, when our Bear (his name) finally realized this new person wasn't so bad/dangerous after all, we would take the muzzle off and let him approach the person (all with him under strict control) and gauge his reaction, which by this time was invariably friendly and from then on that person was his friend for life and allowed to come and go unmolested.
 

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"I purchased him for $500 and received his AKC papers work in the mail."
I'll go out on a limb and assume this isn't the type of breeder that takes dogs back forever. But yes, contacting the breeder first is always on your should do list.

"I'm in college now and facing financial and health issues to the point where a family member had to take him in"
People in this situation GENERALLY don't have money for a board and train, or a private trainer.

Calling a breed specific rescue and having an in person meet/greet/powow is probably the closest this person can get to a skilled eval. And no it isn't a rescues responsibility to tell someone to put a dog down, but especially a breed specific one WILL have an interest in saving a dog that may have trainable or manageable behaviors that the current owner may not realize is trainable and manageable. Nobody here reading a post can tell what is really going on.

I once met and evaluated an "aggressive"GSD that was labeled as such because he attacked a small dog in the house, and then the shelter would not put him on the adoption floor because he was "exhibiting concerning behavior". His concerning behavior was excited gentle mouthing and vocalizing because he was being let out of his kennel, and tug/ball drive. He misdirected sometimes and got your hand. Dog was actually social, happy to play tug with a new person, and was aloof towards other dogs at the shelter passing by. He was also handler searching. It was heartbreaking. His name was Zues, he is probably dead because people who don't understand the breed misdescribed things. He didnt get adopted by the potential home we had (I was going to pull for the rescue) because the vet at the shelter said his hips looked (edited to correct info) "ok" on Xray but did feel loose when they moved them around. They xrayed during a neuter at the potential adopters request. What are the chances a shelter vet used proper postioning during a casual xray during a neuter or knew how to evaluate socket tightness manually ? MMMM..not very good. The dog was about 3 and had beautiful movement. Shame.

If I have learned nothing over the last 2.5 years in being more personally involved with the breed, is never believe what you are told by just anyone, believe what you see or what known skilled people tell you.
I tend to agree with Selzer's advice. If you decide to take it, our experience with our previous shepherd might help dealing with the situation long term. Our previous GSD turned about as aggressive as yours is at about a year old. Neutering helped a little, but not all that much. In neutral territory (like the vet's office) he was generally fine, but in the house or on the streets where I habitually walked him ('his territory') if a person or a dog came withing 20 feet my wife used to jokingly say that "he would eat them soon as look at them." With his family and friends, he was a 95 lb lapdog. The aggressiveness never changed enough even after neutering and training to make him trustworthy and for 10+ years (he died of DM and even the last 2 years of his life with him in a hip sling didn't change the behavior all that much) walks with him were a constant zig-zig of street crossings to avoid other people and dogs. What we did learn is that we could acclimate him to new people inside the house by muzzling him and letting him slowly get acclimated to the new person on his own terms as long as the new person was willing to put up with up to a few minutes of seriously vicious sounding barking in the beginning. Keeping him under control could eliminate the barking, but didn't let him come to terms with the new person, so letting him acclimate on his own terms was the only option that we found to work. After a little while he would quiet down because the barking was having no effect and he couldn't do much more than bark. Eventually he would approach the person and sniff them and then ignore them. After a further while, when he approached again and if he allowed it then the person might pet him, which would happen eventually. After an hour or 2 of this, when our Bear (his name) finally realized this new person wasn't so bad/dangerous after all, we would take the muzzle off and let him approach the person (all with him under strict control) and gauge his reaction, which by this time was invariably friendly and from then on that person was his friend for life and allowed to come and go unmolested.
The dog can live in a 10'x15' kennel until you are finished with college. I doubt very much that he would have attacked the pit if you weren't there. That sounded like resource guarding, and you were the resource. He saw the pit bull trying to get attention from HIS person. I would suggest to the brother that he ensure the pit bull is inside when he goes out to care for your dog. If you finish college in 2-3 years, the dog may still have 4-6 good years as your best buddy. You can manage such a dog, by waking at night, using a muzzle, and so forth.

My brother's dog was 3 years old when his partner died. He could not manage the rent on his own, and my parents let him move back in with them, but would not allow him to bring the dog. Jazzy did not get along with my 2 year old bitch. We had WWIII at my house one day, and all three of us were in the ER. They were jealous of attention I was giving, the bitches HATED each other, would have killed each other. Jazzy stayed outside in a kennel for two years. It did not hurt her at all. When my brother finished school and bought a house he came and took Jazzy home. She lived in the house with him, and loved the cats, and when I came over, she ADORED me. She lived to be over 13. And, my brother didn't bother to visit her when she was at my house. She was his dog though and very bonded to him. It's a temporary arrangement.

Neutering can make a difference Dogs have testosterone and like other male animals, if you remove the hormones, it can alter some behaviors. Neutering WITH an increase in exercise, leadership, and training would do best, but you are not in a position to do all of that now. But keeping him in the kennel at your brothers is better than putting the dog down. It's harder on you than the dog because you see the dog through a human filter.

How committed are you to the dog. If you are willing to buy the dog's food, and do something in return for your brother, it's a workable solution.
I have had/trained GSD's for twice as long as you have lived. The more I learn about women, the more I love my dogs. If you are able to finish college, you are able to take care of this problem. I currently have two rescued aggressive GSD's, & recently buried another. Lobo's owner wanted a good watch dog, & got Lobo as a puppy. He was tied to a tree for five years, slept in his own pee/poop, & twice/day his owner threw some rice on the ground & beat him with a 2x4---until one day Lobo broke his rope & killed the guy. I took Lobo home as police were on their way to shoot him. The rope had cut into his neck, & it took weeks to heal. He never wore a collar, & was with me 24/7. Never had a problem with animals or people for our 10 years together. Now I have three GSD's---all rescued & all "aggressive". I will gladly take yours (here in Costa Rica) but would prefer you grow up & learn personal responsibility. Trust me, you'll earn more doing that than you will in school. You can call me (AJ) at ** Personal info removed **
 

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I agree with those who are encouraging you to keep the dog where he is until you finish college. visit him as often as you can. in the meantime watch all the videos on u-tube regarding working with aggresive dogs- there are many different trainers and you can learn a lot.
 
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