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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I haven't been here for a while, but trouble has turned me in this direction. The three trainers we had in mind didn't work. One was sketchy, the other had unsure records, and the third was incredibly expensive. ( this isn't about trainers though)

And Kias' behavior is not getting better.

On Thursday our dog sitter (we were on vacation) was given a rude awakening. Kias loves her husband to death, and when she was with him (her husband) for a few minutes Kias got reactive very suddenly. The behavior was aimed in her direction. I'm thinking it was protectiveness, but I'm not sure. He did it again on Friday as they sat together watching TV. He was jumping around, barking, and getting upset overall when she got near her husband.
My parents think it has to do with the sounds. One time she was getting on a rocking chair (creaking) and the other time she was using a roller (sticky roller thing, it makes a weird sound) on him. But I don't think that's the case, or has anything at all to do with it.

I've no idea what to do other than correct the behavior as soon as I see it. But the weird thing is that he's never done it with us! Never ever has he been like that around any of my family.

Also he has taken a swipe at a kid who put his hand out to him. He was fine and wagging his tail until the kid reached his hand out. Then he backed away, and when the kid didn't remove his hand, Kias took a swipe. No harm done thankfully, but it happened so fast and in an area that I didn't want to make a commotion in. So I wasn't able to do anything but bring him out the door as fast as I could.

I know if that has to do with the hands, because he was fine until the hand came out, and it was obvious he was staring at the hand as he backed away. That time it was reactivity.

I really need some immediate suggestions on how to go about dealing with the hand thing and the protectiveness please. I'm hoping he won't do the protective thing again, but I'd rather be sure and get some suggestions for what to do when that happens.

If anyone has any suggestions or comments, please share them. Positive or Negative.

Thanks guys.

P.S. I know I'm not probably the most reputable person around here after the whole dominant dog thing I started and how I responded to the comments given. I was trying to do something I wasn't able to do and I made the wrong statement of myself. (More like I made a fool of myself) I'm trying to renew my reputation now and leave that behind. If there are any hard feelings in that direction, I apologize. I was getting to overly confident in this place, so I took a big break. Apologies are aimed at whoever responded to the Dominant Dog thread or any others that I made a fool of myself in.
 

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Hey no matter what or who, everyone has made an error in judgement, had an opposing view or overreacted to something. Don't fret, people are on here to help. I don't have experience with this but I would consider training him to a muzzle, he can wear it around others until you have this issue underhand. Best to you!
 

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Just to clarify, it seems you have two issues:

  • jealousy led to aggressive posturing while his family was out of town
  • reactive towards kid reaching into his space while out in public. What does 'swipe' mean here (bite, paw, bark)?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just to clarify, it seems you have two issues:

  • jealousy led to aggressive posturing while his family was out of town
  • reactive towards kid reaching into his space while out in public. What does 'swipe' mean here (bite, paw, bark)?
Nip/bite. Not a real hard bite, just more of a nip.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey no matter what or who, everyone has made an error in judgement, had an opposing view or overreacted to something. Don't fret, people are on here to help. I don't have experience with this but I would consider training him to a muzzle, he can wear it around others until you have this issue underhand. Best to you!
You are right. I really didn't want to muzzle him, but it seems to be the best safety precaution. Does it make people less inclined to approach him if I use a muzzle? I want people to still to approach him so that he can get used to it.
 

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Jealousy-
If you aren’t seeing the reactivity, it would be hard to work on. My boy has moments of jealousy with loved ones. It’s almost like resource guarding. I worked on putting my hand on my husband, then ‘yes’ and treating. Then hugging, ‘yes’ and treating. Then hugging and kissy noises, etc. Baby steps so the dog realizes what to do in those situations. It didn’t take long for him to adjust to it.

Kid reactivity-
I agree with the muzzle idea for now. Did Kias bark or whine at all to show his discomfort? If it were me, I’d really analyze the signs he was giving you before that event. If you really think about it, kids are a strange entity. They move weird and act unpredictably. If the dog is already over stimulated by a new place or too much socialization at once, then a kid would become an easy target because they are so abnormal and don’t follow typical human rules. But it’s really hard to judge from an online post description. More exposure from a distance might help with realizing the kids aren’t a weird alien race but tiny, energetic humans. My boy does great with kids at home but in public, he’s still uncomfortable around them. Playgrounds are a very strange thing to him. Just make sure he’s either muzzled or there is a great distance if you are working on exposure.
 

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Your dog is only 6 months old right? Kind of normal for pups to go through a bratty stage at that age. What did your dog-sitter do when he was barking at her? If she doesn't tell him off or show authority then of course he won't respect her.

If your dog doesn't like to be approached and touched by strangers then personally I wouldn't encourage people to do that. If he is showing discomfort, backing away, barking / growling etc, then you need to stop it immediately.
 

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Apologies are aimed at whoever responded to the Dominant Dog thread or any others that I made a fool of myself in.
Thank you for apologizing to the helpful member on the list. Please don't think of yourself as a fool.
1. Internet discussions get heated. That is just the nature of things. Without the face to face signaling of normal conversation, it can be hard to communicate about emotionally charged issues.
2. Dominance theory is a very heated issue. Like many other things in dog training if you put five people in a room... over the course of a 1-hour discussion you will hear ten different opinions.
3. Dominance theory is complicated and quite hard to experimentally prove with scientific rigor.

You did the correct thing in letting the issue drop. Then you continued your learning from another approach with fresh observations about your dog which stimulated fresh questions.

I had a similar issue with my barking out the windows thread. Many people gave sound advice that worked well from their experience. I got frustrated because, after biweekly sessions with my trainer and a followup with my vet, the experiences people were sharing diverged greatly from the recommendations from my local professionals. My outburst was largely directed at myself. As a new GSD owner, I didn't have the knowledge or vocabulary to clearly express myself.

My local professionals have been great for helping me read and understand my dog. This list has been great for helping think about what is going on in the pup's head and why that might be.

As far as the nipping at another kid, I got a "Please ignore me I'm training" Dog vest from Vest (select your size), Please Ignore Me, I'm Training, Light weight service dog style vest, dog vest, dog cape, jacket, in training . Ole can get remain calm while standing right next people... as long as they don't stare at him or reach out a hand to pet the top of his head. To be honest, I would be pretty grumpy if someone I didn't know tried to pat me on the top of my head.

Instead of letting people touch Ole. I ask them to:
1. Kneel down about 5 feet from Ole.
2. Hold their hand out with their palm up about a foot off the ground. No treats in their hand.
3. Then I ask them to say 'touch.' That is the cue I use to have Ole touch my palm with his nose.
4. Ole can make the decision to touch their palm with his nose and receive a treat from me or he can move on. I just say sorry, " It looks like we need to do some more desensitization training." No harm, No foul.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Jealousy-
If you aren’t seeing the reactivity, it would be hard to work on. My boy has moments of jealousy with loved ones. It’s almost like resource guarding. I worked on putting my hand on my husband, then ‘yes’ and treating. Then hugging, ‘yes’ and treating. Then hugging and kissy noises, etc. Baby steps so the dog realizes what to do in those situations. It didn’t take long for him to adjust to it.

Kid reactivity-
I agree with the muzzle idea for now. Did Kias bark or whine at all to show his discomfort? If it were me, I’d really analyze the signs he was giving you before that event. If you really think about it, kids are a strange entity. They move weird and act unpredictably. If the dog is already over stimulated by a new place or too much socialization at once, then a kid would become an easy target because they are so abnormal and don’t follow typical human rules. But it’s really hard to judge from an online post description. More exposure from a distance might help with realizing the kids aren’t a weird alien race but tiny, energetic humans. My boy does great with kids at home but in public, he’s still uncomfortable around them. Playgrounds are a very strange thing to him. Just make sure he’s either muzzled or there is a great distance if you are working on exposure.
He didn't bark or whine, but he backed away and turned his head to the side with his ears flat. I noticed that and I could have caught the kid and pushed his hand away or something, but it happened too fast.

Your dog is only 6 months old right? Kind of normal for pups to go through a bratty stage at that age. What did your dog-sitter do when he was barking at her? If she doesn't tell him off or show authority then of course he won't respect her.

If your dog doesn't like to be approached and touched by strangers then personally I wouldn't encourage people to do that. If he is showing discomfort, backing away, barking / growling etc, then you need to stop it immediately.
He is 6 months old. I don't think the hand situation was bratty; however, that's possible with the dog sitter. I don't know what she did, but I know her to be pretty firm with her dog and Kias and I don't think she ignored the situation. I do think she corrected him, but I will ask her and find out what she did.

He was frightened when the kid put his hand out. The reactivity is based on when people get into his space, make eye contact with him or me, or talk to either one of us.

I agree he shouldn't be touched by strangers on a regular basis, but I don't want a dog that is growling and barking at people whenever we walk past them. Do you have any ways that I could do that without getting people around him too much?

I was thinking of maybe having my brother run ahead and ask a person coming toward us to give him a treat as they go past, and maybe putting their hand out really slowly with the treat in it when they come up.

Thank you for apologizing to the helpful member on the list. Please don't think of yourself as a fool.
1. Internet discussions get heated. That is just the nature of things. Without the face to face signaling of normal conversation, it can be hard to communicate about emotionally charged issues.
2. Dominance theory is a very heated issue. Like many other things in dog training if you put five people in a room... over the course of a 1-hour discussion you will hear ten different opinions.
3. Dominance theory is complicated and quite hard to experimentally prove with scientific rigor.

You did the correct thing in letting the issue drop. Then you continued your learning from another approach with fresh observations about your dog which stimulated fresh questions.

I had a similar issue with my barking out the windows thread. Many people gave sound advice that worked well from their experience. I got frustrated because, after biweekly sessions with my trainer and a followup with my vet, the experiences people were sharing diverged greatly from the recommendations from my local professionals. My outburst was largely directed at myself. As a new GSD owner, I didn't have the knowledge or vocabulary to clearly express myself.

My local professionals have been great for helping me read and understand my dog. This list has been great for helping think about what is going on in the pup's head and why that might be.

As far as the nipping at another kid, I got a "Please ignore me I'm training" Dog vest from Vest (select your size), Please Ignore Me, I'm Training, Light weight service dog style vest, dog vest, dog cape, jacket, in training . Ole can get remain calm while standing right next people... as long as they don't stare at him or reach out a hand to pet the top of his head. To be honest, I would be pretty grumpy if someone I didn't know tried to pat me on the top of my head.

Instead of letting people touch Ole. I ask them to:
1. Kneel down about 5 feet from Ole.
2. Hold their hand out with their palm up about a foot off the ground. No treats in their hand.
3. Then I ask them to say 'touch.' That is the cue I use to have Ole touch my palm with his nose.
4. Ole can make the decision to touch their palm with his nose and receive a treat from me or he can move on. I just say sorry, " It looks like we need to do some more desensitization training." No harm, No foul.
Thanks for that Dave. That's so true.

About Kias; good plan. I could definitely try that. The only problem is that I know and have a lot of kids coming to my house frequently that are young and want, of course, to touch the doggie all over. I guess he just needs to be in his crate for that.

He has a very similar reaction as Ole. He could go through a crowd if asked, just when people start actually coming near his space and making eye contact or touching him, then it is a whole different ballgame.
 

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Kathryn,
First of all, I've had and/or been around German Shepherds since I was born (that's over 40 years) and I'm still learning. I don't claim to know everything and I've sought advice on here as you know. Every dog is different and everyone has their own way of feeding, training, and dealing with issues. Not every bit of advice is helpful. That being said, first of all I would tell people you come in contact with to ignore Kias, especially kids. They should not look at him or attempt to touch him until he demonstrates that he is ready for it. A lot of people just don't read the signs. Crating him when people are over is a good idea. Second, I don't think a lot of people on here realize(d) you are a kid. A very intelligent kid, but one nonetheless. I know I didn't at first. So, at least in my opinion, that should be enough for people to forgive and forget on here and move on!
 

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Thank you for apologizing to the helpful member on the list. Please don't think of yourself as a fool.
1. Internet discussions get heated. That is just the nature of things. Without the face to face signaling of normal conversation, it can be hard to communicate about emotionally charged issues.
2. Dominance theory is a very heated issue. Like many other things in dog training if you put five people in a room... over the course of a 1-hour discussion you will hear ten different opinions.
3. Dominance theory is complicated and quite hard to experimentally prove with scientific rigor.

You did the correct thing in letting the issue drop. Then you continued your learning from another approach with fresh observations about your dog which stimulated fresh questions.

I had a similar issue with my barking out the windows thread. Many people gave sound advice that worked well from their experience. I got frustrated because, after biweekly sessions with my trainer and a followup with my vet, the experiences people were sharing diverged greatly from the recommendations from my local professionals. My outburst was largely directed at myself. As a new GSD owner, I didn't have the knowledge or vocabulary to clearly express myself.

My local professionals have been great for helping me read and understand my dog. This list has been great for helping think about what is going on in the pup's head and why that might be.

As far as the nipping at another kid, I got a "Please ignore me I'm training" Dog vest from Vest (select your size), Please Ignore Me, I'm Training, Light weight service dog style vest, dog vest, dog cape, jacket, in training . Ole can get remain calm while standing right next people... as long as they don't stare at him or reach out a hand to pet the top of his head. To be honest, I would be pretty grumpy if someone I didn't know tried to pat me on the top of my head.

Instead of letting people touch Ole. I ask them to:
1. Kneel down about 5 feet from Ole.
2. Hold their hand out with their palm up about a foot off the ground. No treats in their hand.
3. Then I ask them to say 'touch.' That is the cue I use to have Ole touch my palm with his nose.
4. Ole can make the decision to touch their palm with his nose and receive a treat from me or he can move on. I just say sorry, " It looks like we need to do some more desensitization training." No harm, No foul.

Asking people to kneel down in front of a dog who has tried to bite someone could result in a bite to the face, and could also result in more direct eye contact between stranger and dog. Just a thought. I don't know what Ole's issues are but for OP, I wouldn't do this
 

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When it comes to strangers, I suggest they ignore the dog and not expect to be able to pat it. Many of us don't allow strangers to touch our dogs without very good reason (vet, groomer, trainer, etc).
At 6 months old your pup is going to need clear structure. They are adolescent and will try all kinds of things to try and figure out their place in the world. A face to face trainer / mentor will be very valuable to you. Trying to solve these things with just a paragraph of text won't be that helpful.
Personally I'd say much less freedom for the dog and a good few months of Nothing In Life Is Free.
 

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It's not a good idea for people to offer him treats,their hands,or to focus on him at all.It tends to make an uncomfortable dog even more uncomfortable.His focus should remain on you.
The other possible outcome is the dog is food motivated enough to go past his comfort zone to get the food, then he eats the food and is too close to the person and feels bad and/or growls/bites.
 

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I don't know what Ole's issues are but for OP, I wouldn't do this
Agreed, all I can speak to is that this works for us. Talk to a behaviorist who can help you figure out what works for you.

This works for Ole because we have been on a pretty intense socialization program for the last several weeks. He has become very comfortable walking around people who ignore him. His reactivity is 90% habit and 10% genuine fear at this point. He genuinely reacted with fear to a little blond lady with big sunglasses this morning :(

I think the 5-foot kneel-touch routine works for us because:
1. I only do this with Ole on a leash in a situation where I feel that I have complete control over the interaction.

2. The stranger and I have had several seconds of friendly dialog outside of Ole's 5-foot threshold. While this is happening I am watching Ole's body language to make sure that he is neutral or slightly interested. I watch the other person to make sure that they are calm and not making rapid movements or staring at Ole directly. This slows everything down so that I have time to assess everyone's body language. If something doesn't feel comfortable I abort the greeting by saying "Sorry, it looks like I need more time before he can greet you."

3. I ask them to knell down on one knee about 5 feet away. It works best if they position themselves at about a 45-degree angle to Ole and they focus their eyes on me while I am talking to them. This keeps them outside of the 5-foot threshold I have experimentally determine with this particular dog. Being on one knee means that they can't move forward by accident. The closest they can move their hand towards the dog is two feet. This gives me several more seconds to assess Ole's reaction under controlled circumstances. If something doesn't feel comfortable I abort the greeting by saying "Sorry, it looks like I need more time before he can greet you."

4. I ask the person to use the cue 'touch' to invite Ole to touch their hand. I use the word touch because I have spent hours loading it with positive associations. I use touch as a recall cue for Ole to run across the room to touch my palm for a reward or the start of a play session.

5. It works for us because the final decision to approach the stranger is Ole's. The person has offered a routine of behaviors that Ole accepts as a friendly yet unintrusive greeting from a stranger. Ole can accept the overture or walk away. I let Ole think for 2-3 seconds if he doesn't respond to the person 'touch' cue. I abort the greeting by saying "Sorry, it looks like I need more time before he can greet you." If he touches the person's palm with his nose he can quickly take a step back and receive a reward from me.

About 90% of the time after a touch, he returns to my side. About 10% of the time he goes back to the person for an ear rub.

This only works with adults for us. Small children squeak and jump around in an unpredictable manner. We are still desensitizing to them by walking around a local elementary school at recess. We started walking across the road from the school. Now we can walk on the sidewalk on the same side of the street as the school.... But there is still a fence between us and the kids for safety. Ole shows much more interest in the balls the kids are playing with than the kids themselves.

Teens are probably somewhere in the middle.

As others have warned this is not just a matter of naively putting a person in a less threatening position and hoping for the best. It is a controlled process that we have slowly built which works for us.
 

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re Meeting Others:
I want to echo others in saying that my dog (although not pure shep!) has a very shephard attitude towards strangers. He has no desire to be touched by them, or even to get to know them. He will stand aloofly by my side. He is 100% calm and silent so long as people don't mess with him, so that's what we do.

My friends know not to pet him (although he does accept them after several encounters, I still don't let them pet on the head). When kids and strangers ask, I apologetically say, "I'm sorry, but my dog is not good with strangers." That, combined with continuing to walk briskly, gets the message across. Before I learned to handle this, we had some nasty scary encounters...he growled and snapped at a client who scritched his ears, at a neighbor who wiggled fingers in front of his nose playfully, and a teenage boy who petted him on the head in passing. I learned my lesson. Although I could train and work on this issue, I am not very motivated... Clearly Rumo has no interest in being friendly with people outside of his "pack" and I'm OK with that. With us he is like a big fluffy teddy bear, rolling on his back and waving his paw for tummy rubs. I want to add that I don't think of him as dangerous...he is out and about a lot with me...going to pet store to buy chewies, lying at coffee shop, and today we are meeting a friend for a walk in the woods. I can bring him anywhere, he is well-behaved as you would want any dog to be - so long as it's "hands off" from the strangers.

re Reaction with Dogsitter:
You may just have to bite the bullet and kennel him when you are away, in the kind of place where there isn't a lot of dog/dog or people/dog interaction. So long as they keep him safe and fed, he should be ok...
I also like the idea of NILF and training and being somewhat strict with him to nip his "attitude" in the bud.

Sorry it's been such a bumpy ride with your pup!

PS I wanted to add that once the "don't pet" policy went into effect, my dog (who used to growl/bark at joggers or people who got too close) calmed down a lot. He has gone by within inches of people's legs, no problem. People become more like background scenery to them because they don't pose the threat of an uncomfortable encounter. At least that's been my experience with this dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Kathryn,
First of all, I've had and/or been around German Shepherds since I was born (that's over 40 years) and I'm still learning. I don't claim to know everything and I've sought advice on here as you know. Every dog is different and everyone has their own way of feeding, training, and dealing with issues. Not every bit of advice is helpful. That being said, first of all I would tell people you come in contact with to ignore Kias, especially kids. They should not look at him or attempt to touch him until he demonstrates that he is ready for it. A lot of people just don't read the signs. Crating him when people are over is a good idea. Second, I don't think a lot of people on here realize(d) you are a kid. A very intelligent kid, but one nonetheless. I know I didn't at first. So, at least in my opinion, that should be enough for people to forgive and forget on here and move on!
re Meeting Others:
I want to echo others in saying that my dog (although not pure shep!) has a very shephard attitude towards strangers. He has no desire to be touched by them, or even to get to know them. He will stand aloofly by my side. He is 100% calm and silent so long as people don't mess with him, so that's what we do.

My friends know not to pet him (although he does accept them after several encounters, I still don't let them pet on the head). When kids and strangers ask, I apologetically say, "I'm sorry, but my dog is not good with strangers." That, combined with continuing to walk briskly, gets the message across. Before I learned to handle this, we had some nasty scary encounters...he growled and snapped at a client who scritched his ears, at a neighbor who wiggled fingers in front of his nose playfully, and a teenage boy who petted him on the head in passing. I learned my lesson. Although I could train and work on this issue, I am not very motivated... Clearly Rumo has no interest in being friendly with people outside of his "pack" and I'm OK with that. With us he is like a big fluffy teddy bear, rolling on his back and waving his paw for tummy rubs. I want to add that I don't think of him as dangerous...he is out and about a lot with me...going to pet store to buy chewies, lying at coffee shop, and today we are meeting a friend for a walk in the woods. I can bring him anywhere, he is well-behaved as you would want any dog to be - so long as it's "hands off" from the strangers.

re Reaction with Dogsitter:
You may just have to bite the bullet and kennel him when you are away, in the kind of place where there isn't a lot of dog/dog or people/dog interaction. So long as they keep him safe and fed, he should be ok...
I also like the idea of NILF and training and being somewhat strict with him to nip his "attitude" in the bud.

Sorry it's been such a bumpy ride with your pup!

PS I wanted to add that once the "don't pet" policy went into effect, my dog (who used to growl/bark at joggers or people who got too close) calmed down a lot. He has gone by within inches of people's legs, no problem. People become more like background scenery to them because they don't pose the threat of an uncomfortable encounter. At least that's been my experience with this dog.
Thanks for the advice everybody.

@GSDchoice My parents do want him to be petted if someone asks, so I will have to talk to them about that. I never really wanted him to be loved on by strangers in the first place, but I want him to be tolerable of them at least.
What is NILF?

@buddyr93 Thanks. I will do the crate idea for sure when my cousins come over. (two toddlers and a preteen) And I will go with the no-petting as well, though that might take family convincing.
Yah, since everybody knows by now, I'm a teen. Thanks for forgiving and forgetting. That's nice to know.


When it comes to strangers, I suggest they ignore the dog and not expect to be able to pat it. Many of us don't allow strangers to touch our dogs without very good reason (vet, groomer, trainer, etc).
At 6 months old your pup is going to need clear structure. They are adolescent and will try all kinds of things to try and figure out their place in the world. A face to face trainer / mentor will be very valuable to you. Trying to solve these things with just a paragraph of text won't be that helpful.
Personally I'd say much less freedom for the dog and a good few months of Nothing In Life Is Free.
Less freedom is a good idea. I do let him be more casual on our walks usually and he's out when he's with his sitter 24/7, so that will be good for him. He hasn't shown any 6 month teenager bratty stuff yet, so I'm hoping he might not catch the teenager disease. But it's pretty inevitable.
I am actively searching for trainers as well. I'm down to 1 who I have to call, but hopefully I can work something out.


One more question for everybody: Any suggestions for introducing the muzzle? Should I do it the same way I would the gentle leader?
 

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I guess I am lucky with Lexie, she is 6 m.o as well but when she gets bratty, mainly annoying a cat I tell her that I am going to put a muzzle on her and get one of my daughter’s scranchies and she stops right away and lays down with that pathetic face.
But when I used to live in a city when using a public transport with a dog, a dog always had to have a muzzle. And I don’t remember any problems with any of my dogs back then ( Danes and G. Schnauzers) you just start easy.. a few minutes, distract him if he’ll try to take it off.
 

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Hi Kathrynil,

NILF = "nothing in life is free" training (for example, making them Sit before dinner and be released to eat. Having them wait and not just run out an open door. I used to do this but am very lax lately.)

for Muzzle - my dog had a pre-conditioned Hatred of them. it took me a long time to train him to it...I began with poking thinly cut "cheese french fries" through the front of the Muzzle and saying "Nose!" as he put his nose in to eat the cheese. Then, cheese in other hand and I hold muzzle on his face for few seconds before giving the cheese. Then, latch muzzle...leave it on for a short walk. After that, the game was won. At vet's office, I say "Nose!" and he puts his nose in, I fasten it, give him a few bits of cheese. No battle or chasing him around the room (it used be like that in the first few vet visits, with him running back and forth and then tossing his head around and growling and snapping while they tried to put the muzzle on.) There are many videos on "muzzle training" online, I watched a couple to learn how to do it!

for Petting - I understand how your parents feel. I used to have the friendliest dog in the world who would stand up by the fence and happily lick the hands and faces of passing schoolchildren. However, I have been able to adjust my mindset that this dog is very different and I shouldn't expect that of him. I think every dog should be understood and accepted for who they are (like, people :)
 

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You really need to find a trainer who can evaluate your dog in person. Advice on the internet are limited in that 1-you don't know what actually real life experience they have or don't have, 2- you may not be noticing or improperly interpreting what you are seeing.

Aggression is tricky and is not something you should be addressing via advice from the internet, the end result could be someone being badly bit. Your dog has now snapped at a child, that was a warning. Next time it may be a full on bite with the intent to do harm. You should also contact your puppy's breeder and alert them to the behaviors you are seeing, they may be able to recommend a trainer.
 
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