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How do I get my puppy to quit using our bushes as a bed and jumping on my screens??? He's jumped through two screens in the past week and jumped ON and ripped a hole in a third. We just bought a new home, he's destroying it. He's crated when we're gone but he'll do this when I'm home and he's just hanging out in the yard. One of the screens he jumped through when I took my kids to the bus stop. I was gone less than 5 mins so I didn't crate him, just put him outside, and the windows were open. :surprise:
 

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How do I get my puppy to quit using our bushes as a bed and jumping on my screens??? He's jumped through two screens in the past week and jumped ON and ripped a hole in a third. We just bought a new home, he's destroying it. He's crated when we're gone but he'll do this when I'm home and he's just hanging out in the yard. One of the screens he jumped through when I took my kids to the bus stop. I was gone less than 5 mins so I didn't crate him, just put him outside, and the windows were open. :surprise:
How old is he?
 

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He's 9 months old and 80ish pounds. I'm losing my crap here. My husband doesn't have as much patience as I do. This dog just destroyed a fourth screen this morning. He wants to come inside obviously. He's inside most of the day but he should be able to spend SOME time outside without needing to jump through windows and destroy our property. My husband just designed a planter to put in front of one of the windows with nice plants and tall ferns to hopefully discourage him from wanting to jump through, and now he just lays on the plants and squishes them completely.

He is exercised and played with every day. And we have another dog to keep him company as well. Any tips?
 

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Maybe he’s not a ‘be alone outside’ type of dog? Mine wasn’t. I would leave the patio door for him to go outside and chill on his own but that lasted maybe five minutes before he would come in and ‘find me’. He always wanted to be where I was or at the very least be within eye shot. Perhaps yours just doesn’t feel the need to be alone for very long and wants to be where his people are?
 

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For peace of mind and sanity, you'll want to fence off your nicely planted areas while you're working on training.

You can use T-stakes from a farm supply store with soft temporary fencing (nicknamed "snow fence", sold in rolls).

https://www.amazon.com/Houseables-Fencing-Netting-Temporary-Swimming/dp/B01N4AMZ8Y/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1507651985&sr=8-2&keywords=plastic+snow+fence

Put a "door saver" protector over the screen door.

https://www.amazon.com/Slide-Co-PL-15515-Products-Screen/dp/B000BD8LPM/ref=sr_1_5?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1507652031&sr=8-5&keywords=dog+screen+door+protector

Those will help you manage your puppy, while you work on training, and will prevent further squished plants and torn screens.

You can start working on two commands right away:

"OFF" (no paws on doors, no paws on fences, no paws on gates).

and more importantly, "WAIT". My dogs can't go through a door or gate until I say "Okay". This prevents door dashing, since the dog automatically stops and waits in front of a door or gate. If the puppy is bouncing around, nosing the door or scratching, too bad, you stand there and nothing happens until the puppy yields and waits. Make the puppy "Wait" before coming inside, and also make the puppy "Wait" before going outside.

You have to be consistent, but it works. 9 months is old enough to be waiting at every door, gate, or opening.
 

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As I see it you have a few choices. (1) Don't give him the opportunity to wreck the screens - which means crate him ALWAYS when you can't be right there with him, until he grows and matures a bit more. (2) Teach him to stop doing that - which is really very similar to 1, because you cannot correct a behavior you don't witness. This would involve spending some additional time in the yard with the dog, or even setting up scenarios where he's likely to try getting in through the screen again. When you see him eyeing the screen step in with a correction. Correction has to be immediate AND severe enough to get the point across...then forgotten. He should learn fairly quickly. Or (3) Set up some kind of protective barrier so your puppy can't reach a screen.

Any of these would work, you decide which fits your situation the best...

Good Luck!
 

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As I see it you have a few choices. (1) Don't give him the opportunity to wreck the screens - which means crate him ALWAYS when you can't be right there with him, until he grows and matures a bit more. (2) Teach him to stop doing that - which is really very similar to 1, because you cannot correct a behavior you don't witness. This would involve spending some additional time in the yard with the dog, or even setting up scenarios where he's likely to try getting in through the screen again. When you see him eyeing the screen step in with a correction. Correction has to be immediate AND severe enough to get the point across...then forgotten. He should learn fairly quickly. Or (3) Set up some kind of protective barrier so your puppy can't reach a screen.

Any of these would work, you decide which fits your situation the best...

Good Luck!
Good advice. Yet I would say it has to be a combination of the 3 for now, not one or the other.
Plus I also think it's good when your dog knows he/she can't go through a door or gate until you tell him/her to. So teach that as well.
 
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