German Shepherds Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
519 Posts
I have 2 gsds and a apbt and things are great here. The biggest issue I have is the fear that if a fight broke out I won't be able to stop it. Sweetie (the apbt, she came with the name lol) is a rescue, I adopted her when she was about 2 years old and was extremely animal aggressive, and would NOT let go of a toy if her life depended on it. It took a lot of work but she's a true sweetie now. She has an immediate response to 'aus' meaning drop it. That was my primary goal with her.
I have had a few issues of the shepherds starting tiffs with her, and she will fight back but will stop the moment I say 'aus'. They compliment each other nicely, the gsds like to do a lot of bouncing and body slamming and she takes it really well. Nothing fazes her. I feed them all together in the kitchen and there is zero issues with resource guarding. Toys are available to every one, as are bones.
I do not let her play tug o war with the other dogs, as things could escalate quickly I think. I also do not leave them alone unsupervised (which you shouldn't do with an apbt and another animal anyways). I have one crate in the livingroom and they all share it, sometimes more than one dog in the crate at a time. I have worked really hard to get to this point with my dogs. I also have a border collie x and everyone except for the youngest gsd are rescues that came with baggage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have no personal experience with those 2 particular breeds but I do have a theory. Depending on the age of the new dog I believe that it could work with the proper meet and greet and socialization. I would definitely recommend crates for the two dogs where they each have a "safe zone" to retreat to. My two dogs are not the same breeds but they are both extremely bull headed. I'm blessed that they got to know each other in a good environment. Apparently the other day (I didn't see it but hubby told me) the rat terrier grabbed hold of Gunther's side and held on as he ran through the yard. If things hadn't been done to socialize correctly this could have ended in horrible things I don't want to imagine for both dogs. The terrier is 6 years old, shows no signs of submission and yet no signs of dominance. Again I know this is no comparison in breeds but the same personalities apply. It comes down to proper socialization. Hope this rambling helps a little.
I am having 2 pitbulls and 1 lab and 1 gsd, not a problem at all.. you just need to get female Pitt if you are not sure because male pitbulls are agressive toward male dogs and female pitbulls are more agressive towards female dogs..
And your Gsd male is neutered anyways right? So no problem of crossbreeding at all..
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,849 Posts
And the rules on the board say that this (P.B.) is The Breed That Must Not Be Mentioned, due to the nasty debates that seem to crop up every time it is mentioned.
very true but it is the topic of this thread. We can let this post stand so long as they realize that the O.P. is from many years ago. If it takes a turn it will be stopped immediately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
We had a pit for almost 16 years. When he got older he couldn't keep up with his watch dog duties and it frustrated him. Seeing him struggle was difficult. We adopted a shepherd as a companion who was happy to take over those duties. He slept right next to the pit between him and the door. They got along great. Temperment wise the two breeds are very similar. Both are very intelligent and somewhat aloof. Try meeting first on neutral ground and see how it goes. Every dog has it's own personality. Both are very muscular and determined but if you can handle one, you can probably handle the other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Pits can be lovely dogs. Sad thing is so many of them are so poorly bred and treated that they end up all kinds of weird.

like GSDs, they can also be predisposed towards dog aggression. Pits can go from 0-60 in a split second with no warning, and some of their tells look more like they’re about to play than attack (their tail usually wags a ton when they’re in attack mode, for instance). They are also incredibly fast and strong.

be cautious adopting a young pit; they’re pretty famous to seemingly suddenly turn dog or people aggressive right around a year or two old during their teenage phase.

Real shame about a lot of them because I’ve met some amazing friendly and lovely pits.
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top