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Ok, this is just a rant but here goes. I do not put any insecticides or herbicides on my lawn because I am concerned about the safety of my family and particularly my dog who spends a lot of time with his nose in the grass. Also I am concerned about protecting the public water supply and the environment in general. I also use fertilizers very sparingly (once a year in the fall at a lower rate than recommended and only outside our fenced yard) for the some of the same reasons. I end up with a couple weeks of dandelions and then the dandelions are gone and my lawn looks just as good if not better than my neighbors'. My neighbor use a bunch of junk on their lawn, applied by a lawn company, several times a year. Their lawn is uphill of ours and drains directly onto ours. Plus when the stuff is applied I can smell it from my doorstep. My neighbor has two young kids and I simply can't understand why he would bother with all these chemicals. Plus, I am sure some are migrating to my lawn whcih really bothers me.

Do you worry about lawn chemicals and your dog?
 

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Absolutely. Nothing is sprayed or applied to my yard. I grew up pulling weeds in our lawn, so all the spraying people do seems funny to me anyway!
 

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Ok, this is just a rant but here goes. I do not put any insecticides or herbicides on my lawn because I am concerned about the safety of my family and particularly my dog who spends a lot of time with his nose in the grass. Also I am concerned about protecting the public water supply and the environment in general. I also use fertilizers very sparingly (once a year in the fall at a lower rate than recommended and only outside our fenced yard) for the some of the same reasons. I end up with a couple weeks of dandelions and then the dandelions are gone and my lawn looks just as good if not better than my neighbors'. My neighbor use a bunch of junk on their lawn, applied by a lawn company, several times a year. Their lawn is uphill of ours and drains directly onto ours. Plus when the stuff is applied I can smell it from my doorstep. My neighbor has two young kids and I simply can't understand why he would bother with all these chemicals. Plus, I am sure some are migrating to my lawn whcih really bothers me.

Do you worry about lawn chemicals and your dog?
Huge problem in the world today! Water shed is extremely important as it will definitely spread the chemicals among other undesirable things to places. I am not sure of your distance of boundary or your financial capabilities but here is what I would suggest to try and alleviate some of your concern.

1. Speak and in writing with the company representative and express your concerns. The specific directive in utilizing many chemicals by the manufacturer and the regulatory agencies in which govern them states something like this: Do not perform over application and do not, I repeat do not spray or apply during windy conditions to avoid (wind drift) Professionals are held to a much higher standard by rules and restrictions and often times can be fined/punished for their irresponsible actions. Homeowners on the other hand can be held responsible but not to such an intense degree! Speak with local officials (horticulture extension agencies) and those that actually regulate the chemical application industry in your area and explain your concerns. Ask them specifically what the rules and regulations with relation to the profession actually are. Educate yourself to the degree necessary to fully understand your rights under said regulations and the justification of your concerns.

2. With regard to water/chemical shed being transferred to your property from a neighboring property. The property boundary can and should be trenched at a minimum to redirect the flow thus minimizing the actual contamination to the interior of your property. One step further but an additional cost would be to utilize a drainage pipe (within the trench) which will assist in the redirection of water/hazardous chemical shed and further reduce the leaching onto your property.

NOTE: Underground shed is very difficult to prevent. Not sure of your drinking water source well or delivered but please use a filter in either case. I utilize a Berkey Filter for all of our drinking water and a reverse Osmosis for all other water being used by our family and dogs/animals!

Hope this helps.

P.S. - I was poisoned by Mustard and Saran gas while serving the U.S. Gov't and have an extremely intense interest in protecting not only myself but those that I love from hazardous chemicals!


These are just a few thoughts off the top of my head and if I can be of assistance, I will be happy to do so!

:wink2:
 

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It depends what it is.... if you can snap a picture of the tag (they generally put a stick tag in the lawn if it's applied by a legit professional with a pesticide applicator license), go ahead and share it for some additional insight.


I'm not in favor of broadcast spraying all kinds of potent treatments. However, some of the sprays that help with tick control have benefits and reduce real health risks. There are also organic lawn treatments that are smelly but don't pose (realistic) risk. I think PA has some of the same phosphate and watershed protection covenents in place that WI does, but I'm not certain, I only know the rules up here. Ipopro is correct - if you hold a commercial pesticide applicator license, you are held to more stringent standards of practice. Records must be kept, licenses are required. Most egregious errors are made by homeowners that grab something off the shelf at Home Depot and dump it all over, incorrectly diluted, on a windy day, when things are in bloom. Bad bad bad. In some ways, it's reassuring that your neighbors are at least using a professional to perform the applications rather than joyfully dumping all kinds of chemicals themselves. Assuming, of course, that it is a real professional - not just Chuck-In-A-Truck.
 

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We don't use chemicals on our lawn at all.I did make an exception this year to eradicate the violets in a section of perennial garden.We are surrounded by farmland and small lakes,ponds,springs,creeks.The farmers use weed killer twice a year unfortunately and I'm sure it gets in the water supply of some households.Filters are a must around here.
 

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Considering a few weeks ago my coworker just spent $2000 treating her dog for a severe reaction to the pesticide that her husband sprayed on their lawn without telling her, yeah I'd be very concerned. The husband didn't think anything of it, the dog broke out into boils and respiratory distress and was hospitalized for four days before being allowed to come home. This is a 4 year old dog with a healthy immune system

I never have and never will use chemicals around children or animals, the risk far outweighs any benefit to me.
 

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Ok, this is just a rant but here goes. I do not put any insecticides or herbicides on my lawn because I am concerned about the safety of my family and particularly my dog who spends a lot of time with his nose in the grass. Also I am concerned about protecting the public water supply and the environment in general. I also use fertilizers very sparingly (once a year in the fall at a lower rate than recommended and only outside our fenced yard) for the some of the same reasons. I end up with a couple weeks of dandelions and then the dandelions are gone and my lawn looks just as good if not better than my neighbors'. My neighbor use a bunch of junk on their lawn, applied by a lawn company, several times a year. Their lawn is uphill of ours and drains directly onto ours. Plus when the stuff is applied I can smell it from my doorstep. My neighbor has two young kids and I simply can't understand why he would bother with all these chemicals. Plus, I am sure some are migrating to my lawn whcih really bothers me.

Do you worry about lawn chemicals and your dog?

Hugeeeeeeee problem in the world in which we live today! Water/Wind shed is an extremely important factor when it comes to chemical contamination, as it will definitely spread the chemicals among other undesirables to places unintended or unwanted.
I am not sure of your place of residence, distance/length of property border/boundary or your financial capabilities.
That being said here is what I would suggest to try and alleviate some of your very ligitimate concern IMO.

1. Speak and in writing communicate with the company/representative providing the service to your neighbor and express your concerns.
The specific directive in utilizing many chemicals both from the manufacturer and the regulatory agencies in which govern these chemicals and professionals in which utilize them states something like this: Do not perform over application and do not, I repeat do not spray or apply during windy conditions, to avoid/prevent (wind drift). Professionals are held to a much higher standard by rules and restrictions and often times can be fined/punished/reeducated for their irresponsible actions. Homeowners on the other hand can be held responsible but often times not to such an intense degree! Speak with local officials (horticulture extension agencies) and those that actually regulate the chemical application industry in your area and explain your concerns with relation to the activity you have described. Ask them specifically what the rules and regulations with relation to the profession application of lawn applications actually are. Educate yourself to the degree necessary to fully understand
their responsibilities & your rights under said regulations and the personal justification of your IMO legitimate concern.

2. With regard to prevent water/chemical shed being transferred to your personal property from a neighboring property. The property boundary can and should be trenched 6-8" at a minimum to redirect the flow thus minimizing the actual contamination to the interior of your property. One step further but an additional cost one must consider would be to utilize a drainage pipe ((pretty inexpensive flexible black pipe) within the trench) which will assist in the capture and redirection of water/hazardous chemical shed due to runoff and further reduce/eliminate the leaching onto your property.

3. If you witness wind drift, water shed, or improper acts please document (photograph/writing) the activity and all pertinant information with regard to said activity for clarity and future reference.

NOTE: Underground shed is very difficult to prevent. Not sure of your drinking water source well vs. delivered (city water) but please use a filter in either case. I utilize a Berkey Filter for all of our drinking water and a reverse Osmosis for all other water being used by our family and dogs/animals!

Hope this helps as we share similar concerns.

P.S. - I was poisoned by Mustard and Saran gas while serving the U.S. Gov't and have an extremely intense interest in protecting not only myself, but those that I love from hazardous chemicals!

How this posted before I was done I am not sure but the additional info in this vs. that post is important, sorry!


These are just a few thoughts off the top of my head and if I can be of any assistance, I will be happy to do so!

:wink2:
 

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For flea and tick infestations in yards, Wondercide will usually clear them up, if reapplied on their recommended schedule (weekly for a month, then monthly). It's just cedar oil.

Lawns can be kept very healthy with the aid of a mulching mower (so the clippings just go back into the soil). If fertilizer is needed, a simple bag of organic slow-release lawn fertilizer spiked with microrrizae will do wonders. We just mow the weeds that pop up and forget about them. Perfect lawns are unnatural -- a few weeds or some clover won't spoil my day.

In Southern California, I could get loads of composted horse manure mixed with wood shavings from a guy who got it from racing barns, let it sit for "a while" then delivered a dump-truck load of the still-steaming load to my driveway for a just few bucks. Putting a thick layer of that "magic mulch" over the hard-pan, stone-like, dead soil in the flower beds every year in the fall, watering it in well, then letting the winter rain finish washing it in, resulted in soft, loamy, lush soil that was full of life. I'm pretty sure that half the earthworms in LA County used to live in my flower beds! The plants growing in it were insanely happy. We needed no other fertilizer, even for the heavy-feeding roses, because the soil was healthy. We just had to live with oats coming up randomly....from the old horse manure. The heirloom tomatoes that we planted each spring were incredible -- one climbed two stories tall....with no fertilizer.

Unfortunately, in Louisiana, all the horse manure I can find is full of Roundup, so I can't use it. It honestly sucks.
 

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That really stinks, Rangers mom. I dislike chemicals of any kind. I have a beautiful garden. My grass is green - it might be weedy grass and full of dandelions and clover, but it is natural and very hardy. The bare patches my dogs tore out in wet weather are almost covered again. My yard is a certified wildlife habitat. My native plants attract native wildlife. The birds that come to my stream ate all the tent caterpillars. The frogs who live in the pond are doing a great job taking care of slugs and mosquitoes. Nature really does take care of itself, if we just leave it alone.
 

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Considering a few weeks ago my coworker just spent $2000 treating her dog for a severe reaction to the pesticide that her husband sprayed on their lawn without telling her, yeah I'd be very concerned. The husband didn't think anything of it, the dog broke out into boils and respiratory distress and was hospitalized for four days before being allowed to come home. This is a 4 year old dog with a healthy immune system

I never have and never will use chemicals around children or animals, the risk far outweighs any benefit to me.

That's horrible. I don't suppose you know what product he used?


For what it's worth, I tested for and held multiple types of hort/applicator licenses back when I was doing internship field work. I have since let those licenses lapse, but stay current on regulations since it applies to my field of work. I don't spray anything on my lawn, not only out of concern for the dogs, but because I garden extensively and eat edible "weeds".


There are products on the shelf at big box stores (Home Depot, Walmart, Lowe's) across the country that should not be available to Joe Consumer, in my opinion. You can do serious damage to people, animals, and the environment. And bees.... especially the poor bees. A product that is "bee safe" in your yard in April is not necessarily "bee safe" in the same yard in July! So important.


Environmental pesticide application (including safe, oil based products like Wondercide, as mentioned above) can be a good option. Especially for people (like some I train with) that have concerns about the MDR1 gene (Ivermectin sensitivity) or other reasons why they do not want to apply pesticide to their dog. Goal: Control the insects in the environment, to minimize insects that end up on the animal.
 

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Anything that is safe to dogs, but would get rid of something like .. poison ivy? I'm very allergic, but living in the country, have crop ups that occur around the fence line a lot. If I get exposed accidentally, I can end up with welts all over .... nasty and painful.
 

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Anything that is safe to dogs, but would get rid of something like .. poison ivy? I'm very allergic, but living in the country, have crop ups that occur around the fence line a lot. If I get exposed accidentally, I can end up with welts all over .... nasty and painful.
Ortho makes an herbicide that is exclusively for poison ivy. I hate even using that, but I have a time or two. It works. I am very careful with it. Make sure it only goes on the poison ivy. It has caused no problems for my dogs.
 

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I found this of interest but not surprising....“What surprised us the most was the extent to which there was uptake in the animals when [their lawns] weren’t having treatments,” he says. These animals appear to get exposed during walks in the neighborhood. This can include grassy areas where others have used weed killers. Murphy and his colleagues published their findings July 1 in the journal Science of the Total Environment.

Full article at https://student.societyforscience.org/article/weed-killers-may-go-plant-pooch

Even though most lawn fertilizers sans any weedkillers are fairly benign I use Ringer Lawn Restore due to the ingredients versus most every other lawn fertilizer. Seems dog-friendly if one has any concerns.


SuperG
 

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I have two dogs and never used herbicides except natural one on my lawn, I mean I use vinegar (pickling) and mechanical means. In the spring I use corn meal gluten as both weed suppressant and natural fertilizer. I Spend a lots of time outside and so my dogs, will not use chemicals for that reason.
 

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I do use a company that has an all-organic program and they test and tailor the blend which means we don't normally need phosphorus in our soil.

And I have made peace with a certain amount of weeds. Most people in my neighborhood want fescue but where I live, Bermuda is much more resilient (fescue has a crazy need for water and fertilizer here)...but the short cut of Bermuda takes care of a lot of that.

I definitely have issue with some of the chemicals. My neighbors kind of laugh at me hand weeding my shrubbery beds but it goes quickly enough and I use a lot of pine needles so the weeds that make it through (mostly unwanted bermuda) come out easily. Plus I grow food in some of my shrub border (blueberries, figs, mulberries, and just planted paw paws)

I was out walking one day and someone saw 1 as in ONE weed and said she needed to run out and buy some roundup. I asked her "why don't you just pull it out" and she looked at me like I was from another planet.

FWIW, My dogs walk only on the asphalt in my neighborhood and go potty in my yard and one place that I know is not treated. :). OF course they are working search dogs so they do have some exposure I can't control.
 

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I have used them outside of the yard but I try not to. I read that wind can carry the chemicals pretty far, so it doesn't even have to be the next door neighbor that is an issue, it can be the neighbors down the block. I also read that companies claim it's not harmful and that isn't true either. My dad uses stuff and when I was there with my dogs over the weekend I moved it out of the way and wasn't happy that he just obviously used it. Now my dads dog has picked up some obsessive behaviors and I mentuoned to my sister that I think it's the chemicals, she did not agree. I need to find proof and symptoms to prove my point.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks to all of you for your stories and recommendations. I don't think I want to talk to my neighbor about it, not sure it would do any good. They are good neighbors otherwise. Besides it is just irritating to me that so many people in my neighborhood apply those chemicals. As I said it is more of a rant. I won't deny that those perfect lawns are beautiful but I always smile when I see one that is somewhat lacking uniformity - a little clover there, some dandelions here...
 

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Thanks to all of you for your stories and recommendations. I don't think I want to talk to my neighbor about it, not sure it would do any good. They are good neighbors otherwise. Besides it is just irritating to me that so many people in my neighborhood apply those chemicals. As I said it is more of a rant. I won't deny that those perfect lawns are beautiful but I always smile when I see one that is somewhat lacking uniformity - a little clover there, some dandelions here...
You would love my lawn:wink2:
 

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The lawn care model for our yard is:
if it's green it's good--if it flowers, even better.
our dandelions practice 'duck and cover' when the lawnmower comes by...
mow high with a mulching lawn-mower.
Our lawn is usually green when the 'all-grass golf-green lawns' are all browned out, and we never water.
It helps to live in a neighbourhood where most folks aren't too fussy about their lawns, and the province (Ontario) has a 'cosmetic use pesticide' ban.
That last would allow use of pesticides for nasty things like poison ivy, which you obviously don't want to be handling by hand.
 

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Found a pic,
our lawn care model is:
if it's green it's good, if it flowers even better.
mow high with a mulching mower,
zero pesticides, zero water (except what falls from the sky), zero fertilizer (except what falls from the sky--yep, we feed birds, so ferts do fall from the sky),
dandelions duck and cover when the lawn-mower comes by, but it's a short season, and heck, such a cheerful colour,

Sonic approved
 
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